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PorscheServiceThen529Plan

How to Protect Rusting Parts Under The Car

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Got some jack stands and went exploring under the front of my 2001 C4 Cab and was pleased not to find any really bad stuff, but there is one part that is headed for rust trouble. It appears cosmetic but actually was somewhat grainy rust that would mostly dissolve off with a petroleum solvent called Corrosion Block that is good on boat parts. It is a pretty volatile/thin solvent so while it makes a big difference, I cant imagine it will do much beyond a few days, especially in boston winters as a daily driver. The rusty part in the pic below is a bell housing looking part coming right off the front differential. I might be anal but am feeling the need to stop the decay. Is a Brass brush followed by rustoleum an OK approach? Any thoughts on this appreciated, is there some better solution? Guessing that aint a cheap part to replace. Many thanks in advance.

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I find one of the worst trouble spots is the back and bottom of the front wheel arch just where the wing opening meets the sill. There is no protection here from grit thrown up from the wheels and the paint is just blasted off the metal.

My car is silver in colour and a very close match for silver Smooth Hammerite paint which can be applied to bare metal. I have taken to painting a small patch here, not allowing the Hammerite paint to come so far out that it is an obvious touch up.

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...

Is a Brass brush followed by rustoleum an OK approach? Any thoughts on this appreciated, is there some better solution? Guessing that aint a cheap part to replace. Many thanks in advance.

IMO, you can never be too anal about rust because, as some of us know too well....rust never sleeps.

Forget the Rustoleum because it's relatively worthless. If you want to stop rust in its tracks, you can't go wrong with a product/paint called POR-15. Over the past four decades of dealing with rust on early (pre-galvanized) cars, it's the only product that I have found will actually stop rust completely. The original, gloss black formulation is the best. If the surface is going to remain exposed to the sun/ozone, you have to topcoat it (with any paint). If you don't topcoat it and it's exposed, it will still be effective against the rust but its finish will dull. IIRC, POR-15 cures by absorbing moisture, not by means of evaporation of solvent. Don't get it on your hands (or any other part of your body) because once it cures it can't be removed by solvents, only by mechanical means (sandpaper or grinding wheel).

Regards, Maurice.

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I find one of the worst trouble spots is the back and bottom of the front wheel arch just where the wing opening meets the sill. There is no protection here from grit thrown up from the wheels and the paint is just blasted off the metal.

My car is silver in colour and a very close match for silver Smooth Hammerite paint which can be applied to bare metal. I have taken to painting a small patch here, not allowing the Hammerite paint to come so far out that it is an obvious touch up.

This is a classic Porsche problem. The main issue is protecting the galvanized layer on the metal at the bottom rear of the front wheel arch to prevent any rust from forming. You can do it the Hilux way but I think I may have a better solution. Since my first Porsche, a 1986 944 Turbo I have always protected that spot with paint protection film (Scotchguard). Porsche actually gave me the idea as the 944 came stock with paint protection film higher on the front fender and as you know all our cars have the rear flanks protected this way. It has worked great for me. I have never had to touch up my paint down there and I live in New England and drive the cars all year long. It is a little fussy at first. You have to shape the film right and place relief cuts in the film to get it to shape itself around the complex curve in this location. Use craft paper to experiment. Once you have the shape close transfer it to the film and try installing it. It may not fit right the first time. You may have to modify the shape a bit several times until you get it right. Once you get it right transfer the shape to 1/4" plywood and you have a permanent template which will work for both sides of the car. Replacing the film when it gets crappy is now a breeze. You can get the film on line in any quantity along with install instructions. Once you get good at it you can do your hood or repair the film anywhere on the car.

In response to 529plan. You have to protect the body at all cost but bolt on parts?? If they are rusting it is either because Porsche wants you to replace them at intervals (like exhaust hardware) or it does not matter. Either way don't get yourself all worked up over it. Relax and enjoy your car!

Edited by Mijostyn

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For nuts/bolts/fastners I have found motorcycle chain lube to be very effective. It goes on thin to penetrate and thickens up to leave a film. It will attract dirt initially but it gives any exposed threads a good layer of protection from the elements. Since I've been using it I've yet to encounter any I cant get loose. It take just a quick spirt to cover the bolts. 1 can will last years

http://www.amazon.com/PJ1-Blue-Label-Chain-18oz/dp/B000WJX8XU

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"Cosmoline...keeps my rifle clean."

:)

The stock Porsche application of cosmoline seems to be very effective. I would suggest having it reapplied. I've stripped cosmo off of 13 years old parts and they are still as fresh and new as they were when they were installed.

Edited by logray

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You can also use cheap and readily available "rattle can" underbody coatings or bed liner materials, which a flexible plastic spray on material that can later be stripped off.

MMM8882.jpg

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Many thanks for the potential solutions. I think I will be able to have an OCD-fest under my car with a few of these things once things dry out a bit in the east.

529plan, Speaking from just north of Haverhill.. It does not appear that things are going to dry out for a while. Worse, the city truck just dumped a pile of salt on my road :-( Nothing like life in the rust belt.

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