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996 replacement engine


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I have a MY2004 996 cab.

Was just wondering if any has had a new replacement engine from Porsche, and destroyed that also...??

Or has they fix the common problems with IMS and RMS?

I got a replacement engine in april 2011, and so far so good;-)

Just wondering...

Sorry my english, I'm from denmark;-)

Regards

Stefan

Edited by boxster-s-dk
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A factory replacement engine will have all of the updates as of its date of manufacture, but while Porsche did find a fix for the RMS leaks (new design seal), the IMS issue persisted until they came out with the 9A1 engine which does not use the intermediate shaft. Because your engine was replaced in 2011, it will be carrying the last design IMS bearing, which is still the subject of reported failures, and cannot be easily replaced with the stronger aftermarket bearings because it is too large in diameter to fit through the opening in the rear of the engine cases.

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A factory replacement engine will have all of the updates as of its date of manufacture, but while Porsche did find a fix for the RMS leaks (new design seal), the IMS issue persisted until they came out with the 9A1 engine which does not use the intermediate shaft. Because your engine was replaced in 2011, it will be carrying the last design IMS bearing, which is still the subject of reported failures, and cannot be easily replaced with the stronger aftermarket bearings because it is too large in diameter to fit through the opening in the rear of the engine cases.

Well I hope if it's to big in diameter, it must be bigger and hopefully stronger,than the stock from the beginning?RegardsStefan
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A factory replacement engine will have all of the updates as of its date of manufacture, but while Porsche did find a fix for the RMS leaks (new design seal), the IMS issue persisted until they came out with the 9A1 engine which does not use the intermediate shaft. Because your engine was replaced in 2011, it will be carrying the last design IMS bearing, which is still the subject of reported failures, and cannot be easily replaced with the stronger aftermarket bearings because it is too large in diameter to fit through the opening in the rear of the engine cases.

Well I hope if it's to big in diameter, it must be bigger and hopefully stronger,than the stock from the beginning?RegardsStefan
One would hope, but they still fail, plus they limit the options open to the owners.
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I have read that the older double row bearing was stronger then the 2002 - 2004 single row bearing. And that the "updated" larger (non removable unless split case) is as strong as the older dual row. That said some larger bearings have failed as JFP has stated. Change your oil at 7k miles or sooner to help keep your bearing healthy. Use a class 5 oil if you can get it there.

Motul 8100xcess 5-40 is one.

Porsche approved oils

http://www.pedrosgarage.com/Site_3/Porsche-Approved_Oils.html

Not all synthetic oils are equal. Some give better protection and last longer than others, depending on whether they're formulated with Ester or PolyAlphaOlefin (PAO) stock. Synthetic oils made from the ester class are much more expensive, but are more durable and hold up under hotter temperatures.

Synthetic oils have different base stocks, which comprise some 90% of the oil. The base stock is the actual lubricant The other 10% or so is the additive package. The relative ability of oils to lubricate is determined by the components of the base stock. There are two principal classes of base stocks used in real synthetic oils: synthesized hydrocarbons (PAOs) and organic esters.PAOsThe base stock materials used today many popular synthetic oils are made of carbon and hydrogen molecules. Theseare synthesized from ethylene gas molecules into PolyAlphaOleflns (PAO). Almost all the synthetic oils sold in the stores are made with PAO base stocks. PAOs provide better viscosity characteristics, are more resistant to oxidation and have much better low operating properties than petroleum oils. PAOs are cheaper synthetic oil base stocks, and aren't as durable as the ester class of synthetic oils. Some of the popular brands of PAO oils include Amsoil and Mobil-1.These are known as a Group IV oil.

ESTERS (Polyolesters)Organic esters are made by reacting certain acids with alcohols, forming acid esters. There are alcohol diesters andPolyol esters. This process uses expensive materials and results in lubricants that cost many times more than PAOs.Only esters are durable enough to withstand the rigors of jet engine operation and they are used in racing and high performance cars. These oils can cost $8 dollars or more a quart. Redline is an example of an ester synthetic oil.These are known as a Group V oil.

http://www.waynesgarage.com/docs/synthetic_oils.htm

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I have read that the older double row bearing was stronger then the 2002 - 2004 single row bearing. And that the "updated" larger (non removable unless split case) is as strong as the older dual row. That said some larger bearings have failed as JFP has stated. Change your oil at 7k miles or sooner to help keep your bearing healthy. Use a class 5 oil if you can get it there. Motul 8100xcess 5-40 is one. Porsche approved oilshttp://www.pedrosgarage.com/Site_3/Porsche-Approved_Oils.html Not all synthetic oils are equal. Some give better protection and last longer than others, depending on whether they're formulated with Ester or PolyAlphaOlefin (PAO) stock. Synthetic oils made from the ester class are much more expensive, but are more durable and hold up under hotter temperatures.Synthetic oils have different base stocks, which comprise some 90% of the oil. The base stock is the actual lubricant The other 10% or so is the additive package. The relative ability of oils to lubricate is determined by the components of the base stock. There are two principal classes of base stocks used in real synthetic oils: synthesized hydrocarbons (PAOs) and organic esters.PAOsThe base stock materials used today many popular synthetic oils are made of carbon and hydrogen molecules. Theseare synthesized from ethylene gas molecules into PolyAlphaOleflns (PAO). Almost all the synthetic oils sold in the stores are made with PAO base stocks. PAOs provide better viscosity characteristics, are more resistant to oxidation and have much better low operating properties than petroleum oils. PAOs are cheaper synthetic oil base stocks, and aren't as durable as the ester class of synthetic oils. Some of the popular brands of PAO oils include Amsoil and Mobil-1.These are known as a Group IV oil.ESTERS (Polyolesters)Organic esters are made by reacting certain acids with alcohols, forming acid esters. There are alcohol diesters andPolyol esters. This process uses expensive materials and results in lubricants that cost many times more than PAOs.Only esters are durable enough to withstand the rigors of jet engine operation and they are used in racing and high performance cars. These oils can cost $8 dollars or more a quart. Redline is an example of an ester synthetic oil.These are known as a Group V oil.http://www.waynesgarage.com/docs/synthetic_oils.htm

As with most things Porsche, the change over from dual row to single was not a clean one; cars in the 2000-2001 need to be checked to see which one is actually in the car; although most (if not all) 2001's are single row.While the base polymer type is important to several factors in synthetic oils, and even more critical one is ZDDP levels. These engines absolutely hate the newer "low SAPS" oils (read reformulation away from ZDDP to titanium salts to protect the cats longer), leading to premature wear on several critical components such as the cam followers. So while looking for Group IV-V base stocks, also be critical of the ZDDP levels. To give you some idea of how this has changed, try researching the actual starting ZDDP levels in an oil, many manufacturers no longer even publish this data. Usually, you need to be looking at "boutique" oils like Joe Gibbs Racing or Motul for products with levels above 1000 PPM.
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I have found this, but I dont know what to look for...http://www.millersoils.co.uk/automotive/tds-automotive.asp?prodsegmentID=929&sector=MotorsportRegardsStefan

Those are just basic physical properties; usually they list things like ZDDP levels is a separate data sheet, but as I mentioned, they are getting very elusive on ZDDP. I like that it has ACEA A3/B4.
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I would say it looks "OK"; we prefer oils with A3, B3, B4 ACEA ratings, and published ZDDP levels above 1000PPM, and preferably above 1200PPM. While this oil holds two of the three ACEA ratings, which is good, I found published data on what levels of ZDDP are involved in their "race" and "street" oils:

"The Nanodrive race oils contain approximately 1100ppm of ZDDP. This compares to as little as 600ppm for street oils." (http://performanceracingoils.com/faqs-ezp-2.html)

So, if your product selection is their "race" oil, the ZDDP level is very good.

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  • 4 weeks later...

All this talk about oil quality is intriguing but how in the world does that relate to a sealed IMS bearing. I read this over and over to change your oil every 5K and use the absolute best oil money can buy for IMSB health. Porsche always thought Mobil 1 was good enough and any oil you use has no effect on the IMSB!Alan in Boston

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All this talk about oil quality is intriguing but how in the world does that relate to a sealed IMS bearing. I read this over and over to change your oil every 5K and use the absolute best oil money can buy for IMSB health. Porsche always thought Mobil 1 was good enough and any oil you use has no effect on the IMSB!Alan in Boston

Really?? How many removed bearings have you seen with the original grease still in them? I have only seen/touched 4 (with 24k to 53 k miles on the engines) none of which had any sign of the original grease. All were full of engine oil.

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All this talk about oil quality is intriguing but how in the world does that relate to a sealed IMS bearing. I read this over and over to change your oil every 5K and use the absolute best oil money can buy for IMSB health. Porsche always thought Mobil 1 was good enough and any oil you use has no effect on the IMSB!Alan in Boston

We have seen more than our share of OEM IMS bearings, none of them had any signs of grease left in them, only oil, even though the seals often looked intact. And quite often, the oil was in pretty bad shape.

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  • 4 weeks later...

Question regarding the Carrera 911 996 engine. My car is 2004 911 with about 18,500 miles. The check engine light came on and I've been hearing some light "rattling" on the rear driver's side.

I went to an authorized mechanic (not a dealership). He indicated that the guide for the left drive train had been completely worn away, that the left tensioner was shot and when he replaced it and the cam plugs that the chain had actually jumped the timing. He said there was a significant amount of wear on the chain itself and the place where the guide used to be.

I purchase the car 5 years ago from a dealership who certified it used. The mechanic said the engine looks like its been driven very hard on a track. I've never tracked it and only redlined it once (very briefly).

The mechanic is telling me that my options are (1) he can do a patch job for about $7,000 - basically replace fix the timing, replace the guides and tensioner, (2) take the engine out, take the engine apart to identify the real problem (determine why the chain jumped and the timing is off), or (3) order a replacement engine. He said option (2) will be the most expensive (likely north of $30,000) and that option (3) - replacing the engine, is my best and safest option. Apparently replacement 996 engines cost around $22,000 or so.

So my question is: does any of this sound right to anyone?

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Question regarding the Carrera 911 996 engine. My car is 2004 911 with about 18,500 miles. The check engine light came on and I've been hearing some light "rattling" on the rear driver's side.

I went to an authorized mechanic (not a dealership). He indicated that the guide for the left drive train had been completely worn away, that the left tensioner was shot and when he replaced it and the cam plugs that the chain had actually jumped the timing. He said there was a significant amount of wear on the chain itself and the place where the guide used to be.

I purchase the car 5 years ago from a dealership who certified it used. The mechanic said the engine looks like its been driven very hard on a track. I've never tracked it and only redlined it once (very briefly).

The mechanic is telling me that my options are (1) he can do a patch job for about $7,000 - basically replace fix the timing, replace the guides and tensioner, (2) take the engine out, take the engine apart to identify the real problem (determine why the chain jumped and the timing is off), or (3) order a replacement engine. He said option (2) will be the most expensive (likely north of $30,000) and that option (3) - replacing the engine, is my best and safest option. Apparently replacement 996 engines cost around $22,000 or so.

So my question is: does any of this sound right to anyone?

For something this major I think it would make sense to get a second opinion. Even if you have to have it towed somewhere else for inspection.

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