Jump to content

The RennTech.org community is Member supported!  Please consider an ANNUAL donation to help keep this site operating.
Click here to Donate

Welcome to RennTech.org Community, Guest

There are many great features available to you once you register at RennTech.org
You are free to view posts here, but you must log in to reply to existing posts, or to start your own new topic. Like most online communities, there are costs involved to maintain a site like this - so we encourage our members to donate. All donations go to the costs operating and maintaining this site. We prefer that guests take part in our community and we offer a lot in return to those willing to join our corner of the Porsche world. This site is 99 percent member supported (less than 1 percent comes from advertising) - so please consider an annual donation to keep this site running.

Here are some of the features available - once you register at RennTech.org

  • View Classified Ads
  • DIY Tutorials
  • Porsche TSB Listings (limited)
  • VIN Decoder
  • Special Offers
  • OBD II P-Codes
  • Paint Codes
  • Registry
  • Videos System
  • View Reviews
  • and get rid of this welcome message

It takes just a few minutes to register, and it's FREE

Contributing Members also get these additional benefits:
(you become a Contributing Member by donating money to the operation of this site)

  • No ads - advertisements are removed
  • Access the Contributors Only Forum
  • Contributing Members Only Downloads
  • Send attachments with PMs
  • All image/file storage limits are substantially increased for all Contributing Members
  • Option Codes Lookup
  • VIN Option Lookups (limited)

Noob - Nervous and need some experienced help!


Recommended Posts

Good afternoon

I have just registered as a member and this is my first post, so I apologise is this is not in the correct place.

I need a little help if possible. I have had a Boxster in the past (which incidentally had a complete ims failure after 6k miles, but thankfully under warranty) and have always druelled over the 996 C4S. I am now in a position to purchase one but want to make sure I am doing the right thing.

I have read many of the posts on various forums which, in the main, seems to boil down to getting the newest model within your price range, even if it has slightly more miles on it.

I have spotted one that I like. It's a 2003 cab tip with 20k miles and 1 previous owner. It looks absolutely immaculate both inside and out.

I know, I know, tip! However, I really fancy one as I have got used to driving autos and live in a stop start lights area. I do, however, like driving manual cars but tend to be too aggressive, and can't help red lining them in every gear, constantly!

Once I have bought the right car, I plan to keep the car forever and look after it so resale doesn't really affect me (tip). I have already looked into ims and rms which is why I'm thinking do I spend more and get newer? But I absolutely love the C4S and would always be thinking 'I wish I had only'.

The car has all paperwork from new and has been garaged. I plan to go and look at it soon (5 hour drive). If bought, I then plan to get the ims solution, new rms, full service etc done (the last service was a major just under 1 year ago - fpsh). Is there anything else I should be considering during the process? Do tip cars have anything to look for over manual?

I also hear people talk about PPI prior to buying. Would it be stupid if I didn't get this done, and just got a list of things to look for / check, even though I am considering the work above, and potentially any further suggestions?

Thank you in advance for any useful info / responses.

Richard

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Rich.

Moving into an unfamiliar car and especially a 996 thats over 10 years old and 5 hours away requires due diligence. There are too many facets to evaluate via emails , pictures and phone calls with the seller. I would strongly suggest sourcing a qualified Indie Porsche shop to have a thorough PPI done. www.pcarshops.com is a good starting point. Find one in relative distance to the owners location and require the car to be dropped off. Address your concerns and wants with the techs.

Among the things that should be done beside bumper to bumper visual inspection and normal fluid checks, etc, etc, etc, you should also interrogate the DME even with a tip transmission. The shop will probably have durametric software at a minimum and perhaps even have PST2 and PIWIS.

996 is a complicated car with many electronics. Anything 10 years old will need attention, and parts do wear out naturally, so its a good idea to know what you're heading into right upfront. Having a thorough report also protect both you and the seller believe it or not.

If you discover un disclosed issues, it gives you the ability to either negotiate or walk away without problems. The PPI may cost you $200-300, but its well worth every penny before you plunk down $20G+ and drive 5 hours.

For what its worth, Ive been refurbing my MY2000 996 coupe RWD, 6MT for about 3 years now. I got the car from Matt and Gary at Oklahoma Foreign, one of the oldest PCar parts shop in the Porsche community. After an intensive discovery and settlement on a fair price, Ive spent north of $15K tearing things apart and replacing suspect items. The car now is 100%, but its been a learning experience. A fun one, but still time and costly.

good luck and welcome to the family.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Moderators

Good afternoon

I have just registered as a member and this is my first post, so I apologise is this is not in the correct place.

I need a little help if possible. I have had a Boxster in the past (which incidentally had a complete ims failure after 6k miles, but thankfully under warranty) and have always druelled over the 996 C4S. I am now in a position to purchase one but want to make sure I am doing the right thing.

I have read many of the posts on various forums which, in the main, seems to boil down to getting the newest model within your price range, even if it has slightly more miles on it.

I have spotted one that I like. It's a 2003 cab tip with 20k miles and 1 previous owner. It looks absolutely immaculate both inside and out.

I know, I know, tip! However, I really fancy one as I have got used to driving autos and live in a stop start lights area. I do, however, like driving manual cars but tend to be too aggressive, and can't help red lining them in every gear, constantly!

Once I have bought the right car, I plan to keep the car forever and look after it so resale doesn't really affect me (tip). I have already looked into ims and rms which is why I'm thinking do I spend more and get newer? But I absolutely love the C4S and would always be thinking 'I wish I had only'.

The car has all paperwork from new and has been garaged. I plan to go and look at it soon (5 hour drive). If bought, I then plan to get the ims solution, new rms, full service etc done (the last service was a major just under 1 year ago - fpsh). Is there anything else I should be considering during the process? Do tip cars have anything to look for over manual?

I also hear people talk about PPI prior to buying. Would it be stupid if I didn't get this done, and just got a list of things to look for / check, even though I am considering the work above, and potentially any further suggestions?

Thank you in advance for any useful info / responses.

Richard

A PPI is your last chance to catch something that could significantly alter your interest in the car before you part with some serious money. Quite often, a good PPI will identify some small items that need fixing, which you can use a leverage in your negotiations on price. You need to remember that once you have paid for the car, everything becomes your problem. We have seen some beautiful cars that totally took a dive during a PPI, including find 2.7L Boxster engines where a much larger engine should have been. You really do not want to be on the hook when that happens. A recent poster here told about finding a 2009 PDK equipped car that was supposed to have a small oil leak in the PDK, closer inspection found the car needed a new $17K transmission. I'd strongly suggest you don't go there.............

I'd suggest you contact the local PCA chapter where you live, they can probably give you a list of shops in your area that can do the PPI.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Once I have bought the right car, I plan to keep the car forever and look after it so resale doesn't really affect me (tip). I have already looked into ims and rms which is why I'm thinking do I spend more and get newer? But I absolutely love the C4S and would always be thinking 'I wish I had only'.

From what I read, to avoid IMS issues you would need to look at 997.2s.

I also hear people talk about PPI prior to buying. Would it be stupid if I didn't get this done, and just got a list of things to look for / check, even though I am considering the work above, and potentially any further suggestions?

I would definitely have a PPI performed. As others have said, find a well reputed local independent that specializes in Porsches. This should be a different shop to the one that the current owner uses for their maintenance. Also, not all PPIs are created equal. You should go over with the mechanic what they're going to look for and make sure that they go through the things that you've become aware of through reading the forums like plastic or metal particles in the oil filter, etc. Where at all possible, you should also verify that the work that's been done (based on the supplied service history.)

One last comment: these are mass production cars. If you have a major requirement that this particular example does not have, wait for the next one.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You have the right idea as you plan on taking care of the biggest concern right off (IMS/RMS).

Do the PPI, because if it passes you wont remember how much it costs once your driving the car. If you dont get it done and something goes south , you will know exactly how much it cost

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Thank you very much for all of your comments. I initially replied but for some reason it didn't post. I eventually went to to see the car yesterday and had a ppi done and bought it! The things that came back were;

Overall condition for age 9.5 / 10

Coffin arms slightly debonding

P0343 camshaft code stored (phase sensor 1(camshaft Hall effect sensor 1))

Rear tyres 4mm and worn on inside, front 6mm and slightly worn on inside

N/s condenser blown and o/s slightly damp

Slight stain around water pump, NSF Coolant pipe slight stain (side of tank).

He informed me that the hall sender is £210 inc vat plus 50 fitting as bank 1 and easy to get to. The online book he looked at said 'check signal wire from dme control module, pin III/20, to cmp sensor for short circuit to b+'....... Not ok, repair wiring harness'

In relation to the coolant stains, he advised new clips as 'these corrode over time and are an easy fix'.

He also quoted 400 parts and 200 fitting for both condensers.

He plugged the computer in and the only fault ever registered was the above cam shaft sensor. The car has covered a total of 35652 km and 884 operating hours....

Number of ignitions, range 1

284 579h

Number of ignition, range 2

- -

He seemed to think that the above was a good thing?

I also had a good look around the car and it looked in really good shape (I am not a mechanic but interested!). The crank casing was bone dry and there were no visual leaks anywhere. The breaks have no lips and pads 20f 25r % worn. The mufflers at back have slight corrosion but only minimal. The car has had the 'Gundo hack' done. The paintwork is immaculate with 2 tiny stone chips on bonnet and no wheel scuffs. No scratches at all. As it is a cab, he had a module fitted so that he could put the back windows up when roof down and also put roof down when moving. It also has a full porsche service history (last one major 3k miles ago in April 13) and I have every single receipt etc, even down to replacement bulbs! Both rads were also replaced at last service along with a low temp thermostat.

I think I may have paid slightly over the odds but do personally think that it will pay off in the long run. Including 4 new tyres, the total bill will probably come to around £2k but the car will hopefully be immaculate at that stage. The mechanic said that other than the things he pointed out, it would be good for another 2-3 years before anything else comes up (other than unexpected of course!).

I drove it home yesterday (nearly 5 hours) and really enjoyed the drive. The only thing I did notice is that the oil gauge fluctuated between just over 3 and 4.3 ish depending on speed and acceleration etc. is this normal? The water temp sits only a fraction below 80. Is this normal too? I just want to make sure that I am not missing a trick and continue driving it if it isn't.

All in all I am very chuffed and I am totally addicted to the sound and experience. I don't know why I didn't take the plunge sooner.

I would appreciate any thoughts on the above, and also other things to check / look at / modify to enhance the longevity of the car.

Kind regards

Richard

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Rich.

Moving into an unfamiliar car and especially a 996 thats over 10 years old and 5 hours away requires due diligence. There are too many facets to evaluate via emails , pictures and phone calls with the seller. I would strongly suggest sourcing a qualified Indie Porsche shop to have a thorough PPI done. www.pcarshops.com is a good starting point. Find one in relative distance to the owners location and require the car to be dropped off. Address your concerns and wants with the techs.

Among the things that should be done beside bumper to bumper visual inspection and normal fluid checks, etc, etc, etc, you should also interrogate the DME even with a tip transmission. The shop will probably have durametric software at a minimum and perhaps even have PST2 and PIWIS.

996 is a complicated car with many electronics. Anything 10 years old will need attention, and parts do wear out naturally, so its a good idea to know what you're heading into right upfront. Having a thorough report also protect both you and the seller believe it or not.

If you discover un disclosed issues, it gives you the ability to either negotiate or walk away without problems. The PPI may cost you $200-300, but its well worth every penny before you plunk down $20G+ and drive 5 hours.

For what its worth, Ive been refurbing my MY2000 996 coupe RWD, 6MT for about 3 years now. I got the car from Matt and Gary at Oklahoma Foreign, one of the oldest PCar parts shop in the Porsche community. After an intensive discovery and settlement on a fair price, Ive spent north of $15K tearing things apart and replacing suspect items. The car now is 100%, but its been a learning experience. A fun one, but still time and costly.

good luck and welcome to the family.

Good afternoon

I have just registered as a member and this is my first post, so I apologise is this is not in the correct place.

I need a little help if possible. I have had a Boxster in the past (which incidentally had a complete ims failure after 6k miles, but thankfully under warranty) and have always druelled over the 996 C4S. I am now in a position to purchase one but want to make sure I am doing the right thing.

I have read many of the posts on various forums which, in the main, seems to boil down to getting the newest model within your price range, even if it has slightly more miles on it.

I have spotted one that I like. It's a 2003 cab tip with 20k miles and 1 previous owner. It looks absolutely immaculate both inside and out.

I know, I know, tip! However, I really fancy one as I have got used to driving autos and live in a stop start lights area. I do, however, like driving manual cars but tend to be too aggressive, and can't help red lining them in every gear, constantly!

Once I have bought the right car, I plan to keep the car forever and look after it so resale doesn't really affect me (tip). I have already looked into ims and rms which is why I'm thinking do I spend more and get newer? But I absolutely love the C4S and would always be thinking 'I wish I had only'.

The car has all paperwork from new and has been garaged. I plan to go and look at it soon (5 hour drive). If bought, I then plan to get the ims solution, new rms, full service etc done (the last service was a major just under 1 year ago - fpsh). Is there anything else I should be considering during the process? Do tip cars have anything to look for over manual?

I also hear people talk about PPI prior to buying. Would it be stupid if I didn't get this done, and just got a list of things to look for / check, even though I am considering the work above, and potentially any further suggestions?

Thank you in advance for any useful info / responses.

Richard

A PPI is your last chance to catch something that could significantly alter your interest in the car before you part with some serious money. Quite often, a good PPI will identify some small items that need fixing, which you can use a leverage in your negotiations on price. You need to remember that once you have paid for the car, everything becomes your problem. We have seen some beautiful cars that totally took a dive during a PPI, including find 2.7L Boxster engines where a much larger engine should have been. You really do not want to be on the hook when that happens. A recent poster here told about finding a 2009 PDK equipped car that was supposed to have a small oil leak in the PDK, closer inspection found the car needed a new $17K transmission. I'd strongly suggest you don't go there.............

I'd suggest you contact the local PCA chapter where you live, they can probably give you a list of shops in your area that can do the PPI.

Once I have bought the right car, I plan to keep the car forever and look after it so resale doesn't really affect me (tip). I have already looked into ims and rms which is why I'm thinking do I spend more and get newer? But I absolutely love the C4S and would always be thinking 'I wish I had only'.

From what I read, to avoid IMS issues you would need to look at 997.2s.

I also hear people talk about PPI prior to buying. Would it be stupid if I didn't get this done, and just got a list of things to look for / check, even though I am considering the work above, and potentially any further suggestions?

I would definitely have a PPI performed. As others have said, find a well reputed local independent that specializes in Porsches. This should be a different shop to the one that the current owner uses for their maintenance. Also, not all PPIs are created equal. You should go over with the mechanic what they're going to look for and make sure that they go through the things that you've become aware of through reading the forums like plastic or metal particles in the oil filter, etc. Where at all possible, you should also verify that the work that's been done (based on the supplied service history.)

One last comment: these are mass production cars. If you have a major requirement that this particular example does not have, wait for the next one.

You have the right idea as you plan on taking care of the biggest concern right off (IMS/RMS).

Do the PPI, because if it passes you wont remember how much it costs once your driving the car. If you dont get it done and something goes south , you will know exactly how much it cost

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oil pressure fluctuation with engine speed is normal. Temp gauge @ ~ 80 is normal. It will go a little higher when in traffic and fluctuate some as the fans cycle, low - high.

Engine number is on the left side of the bottom on a slanted, machined boss. The number can be very hard to see/read as it is a series of punch marks.

post-30824-0-82754100-1393383278.jpg

Edited by fpb111
Link to comment
Share on other sites

What's the engine number?

Where do I go to find it? Excuse my ignorance as new to this.... what info would you be able to find out about it?

Cheers

You will be able to tell if the engine matches the age of the car and if it is an exchange unit.

Did you do an HPI check to find out if there is any outstanding debt on the car or if it has been classed as a write off?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What's the engine number?

Where do I go to find it? Excuse my ignorance as new to this.... what info would you be able to find out about it?

Cheers

You will be able to tell if the engine matches the age of the car and if it is an exchange unit.

Did you do an HPI check to find out if there is any outstanding debt on the car or if it has been classed as a write off?

Ah, right. No, I didn't get this done. Strangely enough, I bought it from Cardiff and drove up the night before. Stayed at the royal lodge in symonds yat!

Is it worth getting one done now? All of the paperwork matches and all of the servicing / receipts etc. upon finding the engine number, what is the process for checking if it has been swapped etc etc?

Cheers

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you both for your help with this.

I have just performed an RAC HPI check and it all came back clean (including no outstanding finance). The only weird thing was private number plates on the car where dates don't tally up. I think it must pull the plate details rather than the car. Not concerned re this though as I have all documentation including copies of the previous v5s and also porsche receipts with the reg marks on.

In relation to the engine number, needle and haystack spring to mind! I don't have ramps and have been as far under the car as I can and can't find it. Where on the picture earlier in this thread is the number?

The v5 has an engine number of 66406156 and this has been confirmed by rac too.

The porsche service book and sticker under bonnet have engine code / trans code of: M9603-664 A9635- 10

Do I just post the numbers on the thread above for info?

Cheers

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Admin

Am I right in thinking you have a car first registered in 2003 and an engine that dates from 2004? I wonder when that was fitted? Might have been a replacement under warranty.

My original engine was 663 (2003 car) and the replacement is 665 (2005 engine).

Yes, it could be a "new" replacement. Only the original paperwork or Certificate of Authenticity (COA) from Porsche can verify the original engine serial number.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The car was first registered in the uk on 28th November 2003 (c16 code so uk spec). The bonnet sticker, service book, and v5 all match this number. Could it still be a replacement given this?

I had a Boxster from new in 2004 (986) and the engine went after 6k miles. When they replaced it under warranty, they didn't change the stickers, book, or the v5. Should this have been done?

What are the benefits of a 2004 engine over a 2003? I read about a stronger ims bearing on a 2005.... Could mine potentially have this in it?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I also hear people talk about PPI prior to buying. Would it be stupid if I didn't get this done, and just got a list of things to look for / check, even though I am considering the work above, and potentially any further suggestions?

unless you're as knowledgeable as JFP in PA or Loren, definitely pay to have a pre-purchase inspection done. the worst case is what happened with my 996 - the mechanic said it was the nicest Carrera he had seen given the age and I wasn't able to talk the guy down any. that's a much better position to be in than the worst case of not having a pre-purchase inspection done, as others have already proven.

I have read many of the posts on various forums which, in the main, seems to boil down to getting the newest model within your price range, even if it has slightly more miles on it.

I disagree. if you want a daily driver, avoid ultra-low mileage examples as they likely have been sitting and issues may arise from that. but more important than the year and mileage is going to be how well maintained the car is, whether or not the car has full service records proving that required maintenance was done, etc.

another thing worth considering when buying a 996 is to put away extra money at the time of the purchase, and then just go ahead and pay to have common problems addressed - upgrade the IMS bearing, replace the rear main seal and air/oil separator, have the clutch inspected and replaced if needed, etc. by doing that, you will likely have peace of mind and save some money by combining the labor of multiple repairs.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.