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rsfeller

Fixed my lack of heat problem (here is the procedure)

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Fixed my lack of heat problem (here is the procedure)


you may be surprised where it's REALLY coming from. My lack of heat problem had me finally pull the heater core and there was the surprise... EDIT: Gang I've had to make some changes to my webserver that has affected the link above. Since this has been one of the more active topics on my site I have attached a PDF of the page. The photos were poor to begin with so being so small on the PDF is not as big as a disadvantage as you may think. Regardless of the photos my uber super write up is al

 

Edited by rsfeller
  • Upvote 1

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you may be surprised where it's REALLY coming from.

My lack of heat problem had me finally pull the heater core and there was the surprise...

See my procedure here:

http://carboncow.net/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=16&Itemid=97

Loren you may want to reference this over on the 996 too if the systems are the same.

BRAVO!!!

This dissertation is seminal with respect to what specialty web sites such as Loren's is all about!-Mark

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Thank You....

I just did the repair, this solved the problem of no heat and not very cold a/c, instead of using elec tape and window/door foam, i used "pipe wrap insulation tape", it has an adhesive back, 1/8" thick foam, and foil exterior.

the insulation tape is made by "frost king" and is 2" wide, available at home depot.

Ked

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Any guess how long it takes for the foam to disintegrate? Did Porsche update the door material in later models? My car is approaching 5 years old and wonder if or when this will happen. It has about 11k miles on it now; is not driven in winter.

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Any guess how long it takes for the foam to disintegrate? Did Porsche update the door material in later models? My car is approaching 5 years old and wonder if or when this will happen. It has about 11k miles on it now; is not driven in winter.

Mine is 10 years old and 100% gone when I took it apart.

Someone could correct me here but since there appears to be no TSB on this I'm quite sure nothing has been updated. I'm sure time, temp and humidty are the factors that contribute the most. My car spent it's life in Miami before coming to me in Ohio. This is now my third used car from Florida and the temp sure doesn't a differnt wear on cars from there then the salt here in Ohio. Hose, foam and glue are rather beat-up after 5-10 years down there.

I have owned several Saabs that have a similar "foam breakdown" problem. My 1987 had this issue and the same model 10 years latter had the same issue. usually failure trends that take 5+ years to show up don't get updated by the manufacture IMHO.

then again one could argue it could have been a quality control issue with glue or foam but I would guess they were just not up to the job. Many on here write about shooting foam, but I believe I am the only one on the board to really ge to the origin of the offending foam.

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I see what you are referencing now. Not even sure why it changed but I'll update the link.

Edited by rsfeller

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I am pulling the flap this weekend. Do I only go from the top or do I need to to do the top and the bottom. The top access is from the area under the wipers correct. I know I can do this with no problems, just a little confused on where to start taking apart, the pictures are not the greatest. Thanks

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I am pulling the flap this weekend. Do I only go from the top or do I need to to do the top and the bottom. The top access is from the area under the wipers correct. I know I can do this with no problems, just a little confused on where to start taking apart, the pictures are not the greatest. Thanks

Note: My old link has a couple PDFs missing, the updated location is hosted at:

http://www.carboncow.net/index.php?option=...6&Itemid=51

I reviewed my write-up to check on why it's not clear.

I believe you are asking how the flap comes out. All the hard work you are doing up top with the wipers and heater core is to remove the flap from the top. But as stated in the direcctions you do have to take the SERVERO ARM off under the dash. Everything is accurate in the write-up and when you start working it will all make sense.

* Removing cowl to access heater core access area.

* Removing windshield wipers, wiper arms and motor assembly.

* Removing braces and brackets blocking heater core.

* Removing heater core hoses and pulling unit straight up.

* Taking servo arm off and removing bottom plug.

* Dremel crown of door axis off for access to top plug

* Removing door/flap and all left over foam

* Sealing holes in door

* Reinstall was opposite of removal.

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Thanks for the quick reply....

I am pulling the flap this weekend. Do I only go from the top or do I need to to do the top and the bottom. The top access is from the area under the wipers correct. I know I can do this with no problems, just a little confused on where to start taking apart, the pictures are not the greatest. Thanks

Note: My old link has a couple PDFs missing, the updated location is hosted at:

http://www.carboncow.net/index.php?option=...6&Itemid=51

I reviewed my write-up to check on why it's not clear.

I believe you are asking how the flap comes out. All the hard work you are doing up top with the wipers and heater core is to remove the flap from the top. But as stated in the direcctions you do have to take the SERVERO ARM off under the dash. Everything is accurate in the write-up and when you start working it will all make sense.

* Removing cowl to access heater core access area.

* Removing windshield wipers, wiper arms and motor assembly.

* Removing braces and brackets blocking heater core.

* Removing heater core hoses and pulling unit straight up.

* Taking servo arm off and removing bottom plug.

* Dremel crown of door axis off for access to top plug

* Removing door/flap and all left over foam

* Sealing holes in door

* Reinstall was opposite of removal.

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I just did mine today. Use pipe tape fron home depot and wrapped with duct tape....wrked great. I only drimeled off the very top of the cap and really didn't need to seal it because the cap slid into the sleeve and sealed itself. One thing...took 5 hours, if had to do it again, 3 tops. I really don't lan on doing it again...it was hot in Fla and no fun....but it's done....99% of the foam was gone.....next week, spark plugs...can't wait for the fun on that one also

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The latest link is now broken. Can you please post an updated link?

Thank you,

ian

ian, try that 2nd link again. I've been moving servers around here at work and my personal projects got caught w/o a home! Things should be running again...

If you need any assistance, comments or comments on this topic please email me (carboncow@me.com)

Shawn

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I just did mine today. Use pipe tape fron home depot and wrapped with duct tape....wrked great. I only drimeled off the very top of the cap and really didn't need to seal it because the cap slid into the sleeve and sealed itself. One thing...took 5 hours, if had to do it again, 3 tops. I really don't lan on doing it again...it was hot in Fla and no fun....but it's done....99% of the foam was gone

Did you use the standard grey duct tape? That stuff will dry out quickly and get brittle and fall apart.

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Hello rsfeller

Thank you for the writeup. Great job on that. I did the repair about a year ago and it worked fine. As of late, however, I have foam pieces coming out of the vents again. I'm thinking it is coming from the two other flaps directing the air to window/dash/footwell. Have you, or anyone, come up with a way to do a similar fix for those flaps?

Thanks in advance.

Edited by CBN

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This is the support topic for the DIY Tutorial Fixed my lack of heat problem (here is the procedure). Please post here if you have any questions or feedback.

EDIT: I have broken my web server and the link for my write up is not available. I have attached a PDF of the write up as an alternative as I get lots of requests for assistance. The photos were poor to begin with so the small images on the PDF are really not that much worse! (but the write up is solid).

Send me a message if you have any needs.

Did anyone in a warm weather climate also experience any water leakage? My AC efficiency seems very bad (though the heat seems to work but it's hard to tell because it's about 90-100F daily here right now) and I've lost a ton of foam through the vents, but the worst problem is that it is raining water from the floor vents on both the drivers and passenger's sides. There is so much water that if I arm the motion detector, water condensing on the windshield at sunrise then dripping off is setting off my alarm 30-60 minutes after sunrise. Just curious whether or not this might apply to my car. Most importantly I need to stop the water so I can start driving with shoes on again. One more detail - the water is usually very cold and the AC is usually on, but occasionally during or after rapid acceleration, the water comes out warm or occasionally even hot, so hot I almost had to pull over the other day because it was hurting my foot.

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Hi guys,

First, thanks for a great writeup! I followed it step by step, but screwed up....

When pulling the bushing on top, I dropped it! I did not see it fall down, and then I spent one hour trying to find it. It is nowhere to be found, I looked everywhere, poked with a screw driver, vacuumed, tapped with a hammer. I would guess I had a 99 % chance it wold just fall on the floor inside the car, but no.

So, does anyone have a good idea how to resolve this unfortunate situation?

Thanks,

Johan

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For what it is worth.

I recently purchased a 97 Boxster. I am new to Porsche's, but not to cars in general.

I too found that the foam had degenerated on the flap closes to the heater core.

I found that with the heater core removed, I could access that flap from the top with out removing it from the box assembly.

Metalized tape that is utilized on heating ducts in homes and offices has a very sticky back, and enabled me to apply a covering on the front and back of the flap.

My wife has small hands and she was able to access it better than me.

The tape should hold up longer than replacment foam, and since it is allowed to adhere to itself thru the holes in the flap, it should be there for a long time.

I promise to report any failure.

In addition: I cannot find a electrical schematic for the heater/air blower. Mine is intermident...sorta...It has worked twice and seems to have a mind of it's own. Any help with a schem. or other ideas would be

received well here. Thanks in advance.... and thanks big time Shawn for starting this topic.

Howard

Edited by Howard Goodwin

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Just wanted to thank the author(s) of this fix. I did this procedure over the weekend and it went really smooth, along with the help of the manual for details of disassembly procedures. I ended up going with the best aluminum high/low temp duct joint taping I could find and over lapped it a few times. All of my remaining foam was laying at the bottom of the door compartment! Anyway, it all works like a champ and I had real HEAT this morning on the way to work!! Yay! Thanks again. Mark

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Note for those who keep finding this...I'm not hosting the write up any more but if you go back and look at my first post you'll see the attached PDF that covers all you need to know although the photo quality is very limited. 

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On 7/22/2008 at 10:37 AM, rsfeller said:

Note: My old link has a couple PDFs missing, the updated location is hosted at:

http://www.carboncow.net/index.php?option=...6&Itemid=51

I reviewed my write-up to check on why it's not clear.

I believe you are asking how the flap comes out. All the hard work you are doing up top with the wipers and heater core is to remove the flap from the top. But as stated in the direcctions you do have to take the SERVERO ARM off under the dash. Everything is accurate in the write-up and when you start working it will all make sense.

* Removing cowl to access heater core access area.

* Removing windshield wipers, wiper arms and motor assembly.

* Removing braces and brackets blocking heater core.

* Removing heater core hoses and pulling unit straight up.

* Taking servo arm off and removing bottom plug.

* Dremel crown of door axis off for access to top plug

* Removing door/flap and all left over foam

* Sealing holes in door

* Reinstall was opposite of removal.

 

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Does this mean you have to remove the heater core and break into the radiator system?  Or are we just lifting the heater core out of position?  If the factory used an open cell foam then why would you go back with a solid covering over the holes?  If the factory wanted a solid material why didn't they just install a solid door?  I'm thinking I would go back with a Polyurethane Open-Cell Foam Sheet.  

 

Can anyone tell me the approximate size of the door?  That way I can have the foam on hand when I take the car apart.  Any other comments on this...  Other than how stupid is this, I guess if Porsche can't get the IMS bearing right, why would they do any better with some cheesy foam?  Sorry, just had to vent...

 

Thanks,

 

Mitch

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6 minutes ago, creekman said:

Does this mean you have to remove the heater core and break into the radiator system?  Or are we just lifting the heater core out of position?  If the factory used an open cell foam then why would you go back with a solid covering over the holes?  If the factory wanted a solid material why didn't they just install a solid door?  I'm thinking I would go back with a Polyurethane Open-Cell Foam Sheet.  

 

Can anyone tell me the approximate size of the door?  That way I can have the foam on hand when I take the car apart.  Any other comments on this...  Other than how stupid is this, I guess if Porsche can't get the IMS bearing right, why would they do any better with some cheesy foam?  Sorry, just had to vent...

 

Thanks,

 

Mitch

You are simply access the doors that divert the air from hot to cold. 

 

At first I figured the large holes were a weight savings philosophy that Porsche would utilize on any model but once i saw the same design on a 1997 Passat Tdi I had to help remove a heater core (the kind you have to remove the whole dash to access) I saw the same design. My other theory is the foam covering large holes allows for minimal amounts of air to flow which may help with movement or slamming of the doors..who knows. Could be a overly connected German think for all I know. 

 

Also...all makes and model seem to have one systemic issue that prevents it from being almost a perfect car... IMS is the Porsches for the Boxster (and other models). I buy ONLY used vehicles and pretty much two new (used) cars every 2-3 years. So over the last 20+ I have my share. In the last 10-15 years I've only bought makes and models I can research on the internet or (hopefully) have a good support group. You find out quality that nobody can get it 100% right and it's going to get crazier with more fly-by-wire stuff in the most modern cars. I've had Porsche (2), BMW (4), Saab (4), Volvo (5), Chevy (1), Vw (6), Audi (1) and I can tell you 83.4% of them get one major thing wrong! 

 

So far for me Volvo from late 90s' thru late 2007 have been hard to beat. By far my roll of the dice has them with the best engines, turbos and transmissions but I've noted other models I didn't buy into have issues...so some good models and always a back eye or two for the manufacture. The Boxster was almost perfect and really was for me other then this heater core as the IMS issue hasn't really surfaced much when I had mine. I'd love to get a 2nd generation in my budget range but I'll need the extra $2-3K for preventive maintenance. I love my VAG and Vw but man...Vw is way to much a gamble. My 2008 T2 Touareg V6 has been flawless but I've been waiting for major failure for almost 3 years, not a good feeling. Now the reality of that perfect T2 is I KNOW it's got major carbon build up in the intake from the FSI engine. I haven't seen it but I see the codes on my VAG COM about air flow issues. But I digress...

 

Just take it apart and you'll have enough tape, foam or cardboard laying around your garage to fix it. It may be a hard for some Porsche snobs to fix it this way...but it's just a car and it's on the inside!

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Thanks, Shawn...   My DD is an '07' Escalade with 144,000 miles bought used.  Never have removed the spark plugs.  I've put 10' pieces of lumber inside, gently resting on the dash board. it's an all purpose vehicle.  However slightly thirsty, but as long as we have $2.00 gas who cares.  The downside is new ones are 90K, so even used ones are beyond my pocket book these days.

 

So you don't think the foam serves any purpose and blocking the door holes is just fine?  Oh, since it's just a car, you won't mind that I installed a LS3 V8 495 HP in my wide body Speed Yellow flyer.   I've got a good friend in Groveport, OH who is a world renown restorer of fiberglass  Porsches.

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