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Showing content with the highest reputation since 10/22/2020 in Posts

  1. Some after photos... Definitely took more time cleaning than building this motor....
    3 points
  2. The headlights look fine to me.... people obsessing over headlights and BS like that are what makes the 996TT still one of the best cars out there, pound-for-pound, dollar-for-dollar
    3 points
  3. You can get a set of small "ez out" hex bits, one of which should fit tightly into the bolt head while rotating counter clockwise, which will loosen the stripped fastener. Amazon and others sell them (Amazon screw/bolt extractor set)
    3 points
  4. I created a video on how to remove and disassemble the front door. This includes removing the bottom trim strip, door lock, door handle, inner door panel, window/frame and door shell.
    2 points
  5. The factory default for the valves is the loud position, so if they are not hooked up, that is what you get. The valves only move to the "quiet" position when activated. The original reason for the valves was the incredibly restrictive Swiss noise laws for residential neighborhoods, so when the vehicle was operating a low speeds, it was quiet.
    2 points
  6. If you are even considering that, that's because you don't really like the car and should sell it. To me. For cheap.
    2 points
  7. Sometimes when there is a voltage spike to the system (like connecting a new battery) the programming can get "mixed up". When this happens the best thing to do is have a tech/shop with a PIWIS re-program the affected control module(s). I think it very rare to replace a DME if most everything but one or two items are not working.
    2 points
  8. As someone that spent a significant part of his career in the battery business, your use of "assuming the proportions are the same" is more than seriously flawed. The CCA test used by the BCI (Battery Council International, the international technical consortium that sets standards for battery ratings and testing procedures used by battery manufacturers world wide) is very similar to the one used by the SAE (Society of Automotive Engineers); which requires storing the finished and fully charged battery a 0F (-17.8 C) for a period of 24 hours, then load testing it to determine its CCA rating. There is no known "proportioning" formula for determining this value, only hard testing data. Lightweight battery manufacturers have been "inventing" unique rating values and "equivalencies" without a basis in technical facts, and that are really totally meaningless, simply because they know what the outcome of publishing the more widely accepted testing data would be: Their batteries would appear weak compared to conventional SLI (starting, lighting, ignition) batteries.
    2 points
  9. People tend to think that all Porsche's are laid out the same way, which could not be further from the facts if you tried. Glad you found it. And you do not need a special connection for the Ctek unit; these cars were designed so that the cigarette lighter socket stays hot all the time so you can plug the Ctek into that, run the wire out the driver's door thru a recess in the lower seal on the bottom of the dour almost directly below the door mirror, close and lock the car with the alarm on, and still have the maintainer keeping the system charged. Every Boxster made is this way 😉
    1 point
  10. I think your problem may rest with the central locking computer under the driver’s seat, which prevents the car from starting by shutting off the fuel and ignition. These cars are infamous for letting water accumulate in the area where the control unit is located, causing corrosion and shorts that lead to problems with the windows, starting, locking the car, and an entire host of other nightmares. Suggest disconnecting your battery, removing your driver seat, pulling the control unit and opening it up; if it shows any signs of corrosion or water, that needs to be fixed first. There have been an endless list of posts here and elsewhere about this issue with photos of what a damaged control unit looks like. Good luck, and this is not an inexpensive repair.
    1 point
  11. If the coils show any signs of cracking, regardless of what they do when water is sprayed on them, I would can them and install new units. Once they start cracking, it is only a matter of time before they fail...............................😉
    1 point
  12. No problem, that is what we are here for...................😉
    1 point
  13. Welcome to RennTech The problem happened because I don't see any mention of locking the cams, a critical step, to keep them from turning while releasing the hydraulic chain tensioners when doing the IMS, which will cause this exact problem. If the cams are not held in a locked position, valve spring pressure will cause them to try and rotate, and with the chain tensioners release, it usually caused the engine to jump time and pull the IMS shaft to one side. Once this happens, you are not going to get it back to center without a lot of effort. Most likely, you are in for a complete retiming of the valve train system. In its current state, you cannot rotate the engine as some of the valves can hit the pistons once the timing goes off, and even hand rotation can result in damage. And, in any case, you cannot rotate the engine backwards because even fully assembled you can get into bending valves, much less if it is already jumped time. If this were in my shop, I would stop right where you are, obtain the cam holding tools required to remove the cam covers (again, a critical step as the holding tools prevents the remaining spring pressure from breaking the cams when the cover is removed), pull the cam covers, remove the cams, finish the IMS and chain pad replacement, and them start the cam allocation procedure to get it all back together and ready to pop back into the car. Good luck.
    1 point
  14. He's not misinforming people. His statements are corroborated by industry and academic research. If you are interested Lake Speed, Charles Navarro, and Jake Raby have done a lot of publishing on this topic. Not all oils are equal just because they are on an approved list and in fact if you look at virgin oil analysis they vary widely in their composition. Oil companies have to pay to be listed and the process isn't as objective, or "formal" as you put it, as you might think. Viscosity is just one of many variables. I started studying this about a year ago when I discovered my timing chain was severely "stretched" and I can tell you that I have come to the same conclusion independently. Anyway, for all the people with knowledge about cars on the internet John has probably exhibited the least self promotion of anyone I have ever seen (he owned a shop but I couldn't even tell you what the name was because he never mentioned it to drum up any business). So that comment is not valid if not laughable. If you've been around long enough what's special about JPF is he's not just another mechanic that thinks he knows better. He only did the mechanic thing as a late act in his career; he was a suit and tie organic chemist who happened to be good at working on Porsches. If you've been around here long enough you have probably seen that every person that tried to take him deep on something came up dry.....every time. His reasoning is always sound and adds up no matter how far you drill and tribology is no different. If you keep reading and have a scientific mind (ie. you're not the type of person that enters a conversation with their mind already made up) I'm confident you will change your view. If you ever saw what goes on at the top of every Fortune 500 company I can promise you they are driven by bean counting and marketing. To think otherwise is either naïve or maybe you have never worked for one of these companies. Happy Memorial Day weekend
    1 point
  15. To answer my own post - a while after posting, I found a local transmission shop that had the smarts to figure out the problem. The guts of my transfer case was made by Borg Warner according to the transmission shop. I found replacement seals and belt at NP 235 Transfer Case Kits | Cobra Transmission COBRATRANSMISSION.COM Are you looking for the best NP 235 Transfer Case Kits for sale? Shop all NP 235 Transfer Case parts today at Cobra Transmission. The noise I was hearing was due to the belt stretching out over the years, and hitting the inside of the transfer case housing under load. Here are a couple of pictures of the inside. In the almost 2 years since I had the transfer case rebuilt it's been problem free
    1 point
  16. Hi all, Hoping to provide some clarity on replacing the crankshaft position sensor on a 986 WITH Tiptronic transmission as I have not seen (or was unable to find) any good/clear pictures of the process to find the sensor. As I found out, it is hiding well behind the plug/receptacle for the Oxygen sensor on the right side of the vehicle. I read all kinds of guides pointing me to the correct general location, but they all pretty much said it was obvious and I knew exactly what I was looking for. I spent well over an hour searching because I could not see it, and found out that on a Tiptronic, you have no direct line of sight to the sensor unless you move the oxygen sensor plug/receptacle. Hopefully these pictures will help anyone else trying to replace the CPS no a tip. In order to see the CPS you must unplug the oxygen sensor, remove the receptacle mounting bolt and push both cables and mount/receptacle out of your way. The view shown here is from underneath the car looking up towards the wheel well and CV joint. A wider view of the area you need to look into remove the oxygen sensor, receptacle, and bracket. You can follow the cable from the oxygen sensor to the bracket in order to find it more easily. This is your entry point and trajectory. Just beside the right rear brake caliper, under the brake fluid line, past the coolant reservoir drain hose. The extension is probably all of 18 inches to get you deep into where you need to be to unscrew the bolt holding the CPS in place. I used the light you see plus a large work light on the floor to finally visualize the sensor. The only way I was finally able to find the sensor was to identify the cable from the sensor and follow it by hand and light. That is when I realized I could not see it due to the oxygen sensor plug being in the way. This is just a wider shot of the entry using the light as a reference and the brake caliper is in the foreground. Here is a view of the CPS still in place, but the bolt has been removed. The oxygen sensor plug and receptacle have also been removed and pushed out of the way. Once you see the CPS, it is obvious that is what you've been looking for. What I think are coolant hoses are very close to the trajectory you need to access the bolt. My extensions were pushed up right next to these hoses and I had to push on them with the tool in order to get access to the bolt. Just a couple of other tips and tricks. The bolt of the CPS is held on by thread locker. Make sure you have good engagement with your male hex into the screw head during removal, otherwise it could strip. I recommend ordering a new screw for the CPS while you're at it, the newer ones are torx and less likely to strip. Once you locate the CPS you will find that you can actually reach in there with your fingers through a path in order to push it out of and into the hole. When you go to put in your new CPS, place it in first without the bolt. You can wiggle it into the hole reasonably easy with your fingers through the aforementioned path. When you go to place the bolt, either use a magnetic tool or tape the bolt to your male hex so that it doesn't fall off. Yours truly lost the original bolt and still have yet to find it. Luckily it is a pretty standard M6x16 available at your local hardware store. But I have no clue where that bolt ended up. I searched by every means possible including a powerful magnet around the area of loss and still could not find it. Hope this helps save you the hour or so of searching in your 986 Tiptronic for the CPS. Remove that O2 sensor harness first and you'll save a bunch of time and frustration!
    1 point
  17. Welcome to RennTech Replacing that module will require coding the module with a PIWIS unit. I would suggest getting the system scanned with a Porsche specific diagnostic tool, looking at the alarm system codes to point you to what is faulting before doing anything.
    1 point
  18. That plastic connector piece is crap. Get the upgraded metal one and be done with that problem forever.
    1 point
  19. Just go to your name at the top right then choose Account Settings - then Signature.
    1 point
  20. I bought the Porsche factory manuals (all 17 volumes in 3-ring binders) in 2000 for about $600. I then spend about $100/year each for the next 6 years to get updates. My factory manuals ended up about costing $1200. Porsche stopped printing manuals a few years ago and the set was well over $1200 at that time. That does not really cover everything - you also need the OBD II manuals for DME 5.2.2. DME 7.2, and DME 7.8 depending on your model year. When I bought my OBD II manuals (again in 2000) they were about $200 each. So to cover all models it cost me about $600. Porsche also stopped printing these manuals a few years ago and at the time each was over $800. So all totaled I likely spent over $2000 for the factory service and OBD II manuals for the 996. For $138 (on Amazon) you get the Bentley Porsche 911 Carrera Service Manual (996) hardbound manual with photos that the factory manuals don't have - and from I can see so far 99% of the information that is in the factory manuals. BOTH service manuals and OBD II manuals. The manual layout is excellent logically each section from General Information and Maintenance to Wiring Diagrams and OBD II. Roughly 11 sections with great detail and photos the factory manuals never had. 1024 pages (and over 7.6 pounds) the manual is well composed and covers even some of the more tricky tasks. The photos are certainly worth a thousand words many times over. Clear, concise, detailed and from what I can see complete - this IS the service manual to have if you own or work on the 996 series cars. I highly recommend it. Updates and Videos can be found here Here are a few photos I took of the book..
    1 point
  21. Well, I suffered 'while you're in there' syndrome... I discovered that all of my cooling system hoses, couplings, and tubes were rusted so I removed them but in doing so I decided to remove practically everything except the steering unit. This is the price you pay for enjoying drifting in the snow! It was worth it! I then discovered Dry Ice Blasting so all of the re-usable components were blasted clean. Next, I painted everything with a under body paint. (masked off all of the mating surfaces). The bearing pressed in easily as I heated the wheel housing to 100C and froze the bearing over night. So now I'm off to put things back together! The only challenge was figuring out how to align the cross-over tubes which have to be inserted after the cross member/steering gear are in place... My rear struts (the reason for all of this) are still on back order... I also discovered that I need B8's to match the lower spring height of the i030 suspension setup... I discovered this when the spring was loose during a test fit. Anyway, B6 vs. B8: B6 is for normal suspension, normal spring height, B8 is for lower spring height, Damping is the same, B8's have the proper spring pre-tension. Oh well... B6's are on ebay.
    1 point
  22. The code is pretty specific, it is seeing a difference between where the MAF is and where the throttle body is located; the leak has to be in between those two elements, but does not preclude that there may be other leaks that have not thrown codes.
    1 point
  23. You can use a smoke test to find intake systems leak.
    1 point
  24. Have had my 2009 911s for 9 years now and the PDK has been flawless. As with anything proper maintenance is key. Follow the services guidance and you will be fine. These transmissions are a lot better than they are made out to be ! Enjoy !!!
    1 point
  25. Regulation of Fuel Quantity As a result of the on-demand regulation of fuel flow capacity, fuel heating in the tank is reduced. This is achieved by the DME control module switching on fuel pump 2 only as required, while fuel pump 1 is always activated. With the following switching criteria, fuel pump 2 is additionally switched on to increase flow capacity. At engine start and then 2 seconds run-on (with a hot start 5 seconds run-on). With a calculated fuel consumption of > 50 liters/hour the pump is switched on, and at < 45 liters/hour switched off again. With a fill level of < 10 liters in the tank, it is switched on and with > 15 liters it is switched off again. Fuel Pressure Regulator The pressure regulator is also built into the fuel tank below the right-side tank flange. Fuel pressure, which is present right up to the fuel injectors, is about 4.0 bar from idle to wide-open throttle. The quantity injected is thus dependent on intake manifold pressure, which is measured by the DME control module when calculating injection duration.
    1 point
  26. That car is utterly gorgeous, congratulations! I owned one in the same colour for two years in London. Get the bolts that connect all of the exhaust system checked for rust. It's very expensive to fix later on and always happens. I would change them all every 3 or 4 years, consider better non OEM ones if you're not worried about maintaining the Porsche warranty. Also replacing the seals between the front and back side windows made mine feel like a new car as the glass didn't wobble. A cheap but satisfying fix. Made the car feel like new again. Enjoy! Sent from my SM-N976B using Tapatalk
    1 point
  27. The inner temperature sensor is located on the right in the plenum panel (at the air inlet housing for air conditioning). 1. Unscrew fastening screws 1 and remove air inlet housing cover 2. 2. Turn inner temperature sensor clockwise arrow and remove it to the rear. 3. Disconnect connector 1 from the inner temperature sensor 2. Installation is performed in reverse order.
    1 point
  28. You are likely looking at fuel or brake lines.
    1 point
  29. According to all the related industry literature I've read, and what my shop's legal consul has told me personally, it is a Federally mandated safety system, meaning that if you disable it, or show someone how to disable it, and the vehicle is subsequently involved in an accident, whomever did it (or showed someone how to do it) can be held both criminally and financially liable. And in many states, the vehicle is considered "unsafe" and would not pass local inspection standards. The same thing would apply to removing seat belts or disabling or removing the air bags. Proceed at your own risk..............................................
    1 point
  30. Another one for Dido Tuning off the auction site 😁 Complements the other (original) alu bits nicely.
    1 point
  31. Sorry for the delay, but the Virus has made things upside down everywhere around New York. Hope it's not too bad in Cleveland.:) I think I found some initial pics that can help you get started in solving the problem with your top... Here is a series of photos on my '97 Boxster when it still had the original "A Version", all metal housing transmissions. I think that if you put your clamshell manually to this exact position, and then duplicate the position of the V-levers and other parts, you will have an excellent starting point. Forgot to mention what the red arrow and the yellow arrow are pointing to in the last photo posted(367.38 kB)..Red is pointing to the "fat washer" under the 10mm bolt which in turn holds down the small flat bushing/sleeve (Yellow arrow pointing to joint) that keeps the overall length of the pushrod in its set position. Of course that has a major effect on the position/attitude that the leading edge of the convertible top will have when it is in its pre-latching (or immediately post-latching) position. A relatively tiny difference in overall length will also have a relatively drastic effect on whether that "final" position ends up correctly aligned or whether the leading edge of the top goes past its forwardmost position and then starts to retract...then making it impossible to latch the top securely. To achieve a finer adjustment, don't loosen the 10mm with fat washer, use each 360 degree turn or rotation of the plastic ball cup on the forward end of the pushrod to change the overall length of the pushrod. Let me know if that works, otherwise I can look for some more. Regards, Maurice.
    1 point
  32. 111,000 miles so far. I’ve put 6,000 on so far this year. Discovered the AOS needs to be replaced day before yesterday. Looking forward to the tinkering opportunity!
    1 point
  33. I also have a '99 with exact same conditions described. When I start the car after a couple weeks the sounds is there. If I use the car consecutive days the sound is much less or not there at all. From all the reading I have done, the IMS chain tensioner is a possible cause and not addressing it can increase wear on the tensioner paddle. I plan to replace this tensioner soon (pn 99610518059).
    1 point
  34. I was able to retrofit a spare wheel with jack and took kit from an older Boxster (986) into my 2007 Cayman (987.1). Clears front lid without touching. Takes up some of the space but I prefer spare and regular tires as opposed to run flat tires.
    1 point
  35. I was lucky enough to get a hold of 2 944's for $300. 1985 turbo which is my project. And a 1987 which is my parts car. Sent from my SM-N920T using Tapatalk
    1 point
  36. I bought these off eBay about a month or two ago. I was impressed by the quality, fit, and price. FOR PORSCHE 911 996 SPEEDO GAUGE RINGS SURROUNDS SET OF 5 Brushed Matt Aluminium ROVER.EBAY.COM PORSCHE 911 996 SERIES (1998-2005) only - all models with the dashboard like shown on the photos only. Box contains: 5x ALUMINIUM DIAL GAUGE RINGS / SURROUNDS Sample Fitting Instructions. Material finish: Brushed Aluminium. Good luck!
    1 point
  37. Ok guys, now that this seems sorted out. In my case the problem was a faulty air change-over valve. Since I was at it I also changed the electric change-over valve. I thought I'd post an entire post-mortem on the whole incident. This way future reader can get all the info in one spot. In short, no horror stories but a lot learnt. A Huge thanks to Loren, 1999Porsche911 and tholyoak for helping me thru this. Guys, I'm going to be quoting you in the writeup below, hope you guys don't mind. If people want to read the original message and the whole thread, its below. Background ============= I got the P0410 ("Secondary Air Injection Malfunction") and P1411 ("Manufacturer Control Auxillary Emission Control") along with a Check Engine Light (CEL). What is means =============== During a cold start the catalytic convertors don't work very efficiently because they are cold. To compensate for this there is an air pump which adds air to the exhaust gases so the cat's behaviour can be somewhat compensated for. If you get this error that additional air isin't being mixed with the exhaust gases. No vehicular damage (CEL shouldn't be blinking!) but your emissions care higher during every cold start. What to do next (if you plan on fixing it yourself) ================================ 1) Observe the connection below 1 - Secondary air injection pump 2 - Air change-over valve 3 - Electric change-over valve 4 - Non-return valve 5 - To the cylinder heads 6 - Vacuum reservoir 7 - To the intake air system Basically 1 pumps the air thru 2->4->5 and reaches the exhaust gases. The computer controls when to start the blower and also when to connect the air link by controlling #3. When #3 is "ON", the vacuum line is connected to #2 which turns #2 "ON". Then #2 will connect the air blowing from one pipe thru to the other pipe. You should check every component in that chain starting from the easiest to check to the most difficult. 1. Check Air injection pump (#1, ~$430) ============================ - Do a cold start, the secondary air pump should run at least 30 sec (or more). - Sounds like a small vacuum cleaner/touch it to feelt it hum/pull off the larger hose to feel it blow air - If the pump "fails", here are the reasons : A.) "Check the electrical connections and fuse (40A fuse on the relay board next to the DME), and the relay (position 10 on the same board)." - Loren. B.) If the fuse seems ok its possible the pump is dead (you did test this with the car cold - cold start , right ?). TIP: Before buying a new pump ($$$) you could take it to a porsche dealership and have him quickly/freely verify this for you. If your air pump works, then you need to check #2 and #3. Both of these are deep inside the engine bay. You MUST remove the alternator before proceeding. Please read that thread on alternator removal - you will save several hours of frustration and sore fingers if you read before you work ! Once you remove the alternator (aka generator) you should see this ... its basically the same system shown in the black/white diagram above but this is how it looks in real life. NOTE-1 : Please note the existing connections on the tubes before you rip everything out. A camera/camera phone comes handy. NOTE-2: For the steps below, make sure you DON'T let the tubes/pipes slide away into the inaccessible areas of the engine bay - they are a HUGE pain to bring back if they slip away (unlikely-but you're warned!) NOTE-3: Finally, if you've opened the whole thing till here, I'd suggest you test both #2 and #3 to be sure you catch every failed part in that system. I simply replaced both with new parts even thought only #2 was bad in my case - #3 was just another $20 ! 2. Air change-over valve (~$80) ====================== - Note existing connections - Use nose pliers and slide the ring-clamps away from the valve onto the respective rubber hoses. - Take the little pipe off - Remove the valve piece out of the engine bay -> clean it with some alcohol wipe (don't drench it in any weird clearer/liquid - you're just sanitizing this for the next step). - Wash and clean your hands (Yes!) - Suck air out of the little pipe and quickly put your finger on it (to maintain its low pressure). If this is tough, ask your significant other (chances are they'll go "eeeeks"). - If you find you cannot maintain a low pressure on the little pipe (i.e. it feels 'open' when you suck out the air) then your valve is bad. - This low pressure should open the valve and you should be able to blow from one pipe (coming from the air blower) thru to the other. - If you cannot blow thru and are sure the low pressure is maintained, you again have a bad valve. 3. Check the Electric change-over valve (~$20) ================================= These are triggered off a 12 V supply. The valve has (+) and (-) markings for polarity of the electric connector. I quickly rigged up a 12 V supply by cascading a 9V battery with 2x 1.5 v batteries, some duct tape and some wiretags/wires. If your physics is rusty, this is the connection figure. (-A)---(-)[9 volts](+)--(-)[1.5volts](+)--(-)[1.5volts](+)--(B+) Between (-A) and (B+) you have 12 volts ! - make a note of existing connections - remove the valve from the engine bay - Connect the wires coming out from A and B to the electric change over valve's connection - If you've got a working valve, you will hear a click sound when the valve triggers. - Now, also blow from one pipe (after wiping it with an alcohol wipe!). - you will be able to blow thru/NOT blow thru as the valve opens/closes as you connect/disconnect the 12v supply wires. TIP: Check #2 also and if ONLY your electric valve(#3) is faulty, you could test the "FALSE HIT - valve from another system" valve similarly. If this "FALSE HIT..." valve works, you could swap it with #3, reassemble the car and drive ! The benefit ? The "FALSE HIT..." valve is accessible without _ANY_ disassembly and you can replace it some other day under 5 minutes when your replacement valve arrives. Also, no harm if the car is driven for the time being with that valve being faulty. Hope this helps ! Cheers! Sid -----<original post below> -------------------- Well, I got a CEL last night. So I stopped by Autozone and borrowed their OBD2 and got the following ... 1) P0410 : "Secondary Air Injection Malfunction" 2) P1411 : "Manufacturer Control. Auxillary Emission Control" My car = MY99 996 C2, North America. I saw some other posts on P0410 and today morning checked the air pump on the left side/driver side of the engine compartment near the tail lights. It seems to be working in that I could hear it buzz like a mini-vac. Not sure exactly part was making that sound, I also touched it to feel it vibrate (just like an electric motor should). I quickly glanced to see if the rubber hose on the pumps lower-back-right end was still connected and visually it looked ok. I'll have another closer look later (was behind schedule this morning!). Do you guys have any good pointers on what next I should do ? FYI, I have modified my stock exhausts with a regular bypass pipe, fabricated along the lines of the PSE version2. It sounds great and there hasn't been a change in the exhaust note since then till now/CEL coming on. I don't think its related but I thought I'd mention anything exhaust in this post. Thanks in advance guys ! Sid PS: I just got my customised plate .... SIDS 911 :D ... (actually SID5 911)
    1 point
  38. 991 S (both C2S and C4S) Front new: 34 mm minimum (after machining): 32.6 mm wear limit: 32.0 mm Rear new: 28 mm minimum (after machining): 26.6 mm wear limit: 26.0 mm
    1 point
  39. I'm thinking of removing the back seats in my '06 997. More of a GT3 look. Loren suggested I reach out to you to see how you car came out. I want to remove all including seat belts and bottoms. I look forward to hearing back from you! Thanks, Don Hi it is really easy once you've done it. Keep that in mind as you walk through these instructions. On each side you see little black plastic bolt covers, snap them out/off, and you'll see a bolt holding an adjustable bracket for the seat back. Now remove the bolt and do the same on the other side. In between the backs you'll see a little triangular shaped plastic cover(#8 in the diagram). You'll need to raise the front lip of it away from the carpeting and at the same time pry it towards the front of the car. it is shaped a lot like a dog's head biting the bar that the seat backs are on bear that in mind when prying. If you put a screwdriver in the back of the dogs mouth and pry it off of your seat bar. You'll see the final piece of the puzzle once it is off. HTH
    1 point
  40. Palo Alto Speedometer did the mileage change. They charged $150.00 and did a great, two day turn around. And, paspeedo.com was very responsive to my e-mails. I have seen some of the recycling yards asking up to $400.00! Unfortunately, the shipping was almost as expensive as the service: $60.00 each way. I insured the instrument cluster for full replacement value and the carrriers, UPS out, FedEx back, required second day delivery......I suppose to limit the exposure to the twenty foot drop test some boxes get. Here is a look at the cost of the project: :eek: 1. Carrera instrument cluster: $350.00 2. Carrera oil pressure sensor: $ 43.17 3. VW Wire Pin: $ 3.56 4. Mileage reset: $150.00 5. Shipping: $120.00 6. Radio Shack purchases: $ 7.00 7. Porsche dealer assistance: $122.00 Cheers, Bill
    1 point
  41. Try re-training the windows. Hold the button down until the window goes down all the way - then hold it for about 10 seconds. Do the same for the up motion. If that doesn't do it then like PorscheFan said you may need a new window regulator.
    1 point
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