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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 06/25/2020 in Posts

  1. Some after photos... Definitely took more time cleaning than building this motor....
    3 points
  2. The headlights look fine to me.... people obsessing over headlights and BS like that are what makes the 996TT still one of the best cars out there, pound-for-pound, dollar-for-dollar
    3 points
  3. You can get a set of small "ez out" hex bits, one of which should fit tightly into the bolt head while rotating counter clockwise, which will loosen the stripped fastener. Amazon and others sell them (Amazon screw/bolt extractor set)
    3 points
  4. The factory default for the valves is the loud position, so if they are not hooked up, that is what you get. The valves only move to the "quiet" position when activated. The original reason for the valves was the incredibly restrictive Swiss noise laws for residential neighborhoods, so when the vehicle was operating a low speeds, it was quiet.
    2 points
  5. If you are even considering that, that's because you don't really like the car and should sell it. To me. For cheap.
    2 points
  6. Sometimes when there is a voltage spike to the system (like connecting a new battery) the programming can get "mixed up". When this happens the best thing to do is have a tech/shop with a PIWIS re-program the affected control module(s). I think it very rare to replace a DME if most everything but one or two items are not working.
    2 points
  7. As someone that spent a significant part of his career in the battery business, your use of "assuming the proportions are the same" is more than seriously flawed. The CCA test used by the BCI (Battery Council International, the international technical consortium that sets standards for battery ratings and testing procedures used by battery manufacturers world wide) is very similar to the one used by the SAE (Society of Automotive Engineers); which requires storing the finished and fully charged battery a 0F (-17.8 C) for a period of 24 hours, then load testing it to determine its CCA rating. There is no known "proportioning" formula for determining this value, only hard testing data. Lightweight battery manufacturers have been "inventing" unique rating values and "equivalencies" without a basis in technical facts, and that are really totally meaningless, simply because they know what the outcome of publishing the more widely accepted testing data would be: Their batteries would appear weak compared to conventional SLI (starting, lighting, ignition) batteries.
    2 points
  8. All of the larger cables are susceptible to this problem. The longer the cable, like to the starter, the worse the problem because their length exacerbates the resistance issue, leading to larger voltage drops. The only real trick to checking each one with either a multimeter or Power Probe unit (Power Probes actually have a specific setting for checking voltage drops, plus the Power Probe's long leads back to the battery make the testing process easier).
    2 points
  9. Porsche "Book Time" to replace both front wheel bearings is 4.7 hours times your shops hourly rate. Porsche "Book Times" are usually a high estimate - an experienced tech can usually do the job in much less. So let the shop quote time - as long as it is under the "Book Time" you are likely good.
    2 points
  10. Looks like the part that goes inside the oil filter canister - to hold the filter in place. Just clean it and then push it back in.
    2 points
  11. Updated parts list (your's is 15 years old). 997.1 rear strut.pdf
    2 points
  12. First of all, LN Engineering's IMS Solution is a LOT more than just an oil feed line; the bearing insert is a solid bearing (no moving parts) with annular oil passages just like the almighty Mezger turbo engines used, the IMS shaft is plugged to prevent oil accumulation and the balance problems associated by running the shaft full of oil, the replacement rear IMS flange is coated with a Diamond like coating for strength and longevity, and the oil feed is sourced at the oil filter to get clean, cool oil rather than where some others have sourced it. Perhaps one of the biggest advantages of the Solution is that it never has to be replaced like other IMS retrofits, it is the ONLY permanent fix for IMS related headaches. We have never has any problems with the LN IMS Solution; it simply works, period
    2 points
  13. I would first check the one you have to make sure it is not blocked from air flow by debris.
    2 points
  14. Welcome to RennTech , and your English is fine, and much better than our Greek! It probably caused by oil pressure bleeding down from the hydraulic tensioner's in the VarioCam system, which do not cost that much, either in Euros or $.
    2 points
  15. Be aware the most dealer will not share the service records for the vehicle because they legally belong to the previous owner(s), and the dealers are uninclined to track them down and get a legal release.
    2 points
  16. I agree with millerchris85. After all the work and money poured into my CTT it’s eh now and I’d have been better served tuning up my 996TT. If you really must have a sporty drive in a Cayenne then I suggest looking after a 958 GTS, Turbo or Turbo S and having someone tuned them to your liking. Be forewarned though you will wear through ancillaries (brakes, axles, tensioners, etc...) much faster depending on how much and how hard you drive
    2 points
  17. A cooler on the return line from the rack to the pump will probably help.
    2 points
  18. Charge pressure sender Manifold pressure sender
    2 points
  19. You should not have to - unless you hooked up the new battery backwards. If the polarity was hooked up correctly then you need to start looking for poor grounds. Starting with the battery cable then chassis grounds.
    2 points
  20. Your stated voltage measurment is weak. You should be testing the primary cables, the large ones running from the battery to the ground and starter, these are the ones that tend to develop internal corrosion. If you are unfamiliar with this test, do a search as this has been covered several times previously. We always load test both the alternator and battery when there is a problem. While this requires a load tester, it verifies that both are capable of delivering both the correct voltage and current (amps) as required.
    2 points
  21. The antenna amplifier is located behind the right A-pillar trim. The single white wire in the left A-pillar is the remote control antenna and is connected on the other end of the wire, this antenna wire must also have a specific lenght in relation to the transmission frequency. Hope it helps.
    1 point
  22. Perhaps but SD slot is in back so it's awkward to switch it out. I think better possibility may be similar to audi or Lamborghini maps. I think first thing is to see if it can be copied so one can have archive
    1 point
  23. Welcome to RennTech P2177 Oxygen Sensing Adaptation, Lower Load Range, Bank 1 (FRAU1) – Above Limit Possible fault cause - Intake air system leaking - Leaking exhaust system (draws fresh air) - Incorrect main charge signal from MAF sensor - Fuel pressure too low - Fuel injector(s) mechanically faulty (sticks) - Volume supply of fuel pump too low P2179 Oxygen Sensing Adaptation, Lower Load Range, Bank 2 (FRAU2) - Above Limit Possible fault cause - Intake air system leaking - Leaking exhaust system (draws fresh air) - Incorrect main charge signal from MAF sensor - Fuel pressure too low - Fuel injector(s) mechanically faulty (sticks) - Volume supply of fuel pump too low Since this affects both banks - it looks like you likely have an air leak.
    1 point
  24. That plastic connector piece is crap. Get the upgraded metal one and be done with that problem forever.
    1 point
  25. First of all, these transmissions are very sensitive to the lubricant used; over the years, we have had numerous cars come into the shop with everything from noise complaints to poor shifting issues (particularly in the cold), and for the most part everyone was cured by thoroughly draining the lube out of the gearbox and then refilling with the factory fluid. Most people do not realize that Porsche factory lube, which is a full synthetic, is produced to Porsche specs, and does not conform to aftermarket product specs. At one time, we inquired of several major lube companies if they had an exact match product, and were uniformly told that, “No, Porsche uses a unique specification lubricant, and the brand market is too small for us to produce a similar product.” That said, even the factory fill cannot correct existing wear issues, or mechanical issues. Second gear pop out is a well known problem which can often be corrected by installing an updated detent part like the Gbox fix.
    1 point
  26. I would check to make sure you reconnected the coil packs, both completely plugging them in, and not having crossed any.
    1 point
  27. The inner temperature sensor is located on the right in the plenum panel (at the air inlet housing for air conditioning). 1. Unscrew fastening screws 1 and remove air inlet housing cover 2. 2. Turn inner temperature sensor clockwise arrow and remove it to the rear. 3. Disconnect connector 1 from the inner temperature sensor 2. Installation is performed in reverse order.
    1 point
  28. Just take the bulb out.
    1 point
  29. I got mine from Dido as well. Look great and no issues so far after 2 years.
    1 point
  30. By far, the larger issue with the power steering systems on these cars is heat, not debris. More power steering pumps fail from overheating than anything else. There are a couple of aftermarket companies producing add on coolers because of this issue.
    1 point
  31. Driving wind can also make such a noise, tape the seems from the front trunk to the other body parts with duck tape, the seals around the front windshield, the seams from the convertible top to the windshield(s) etc., do test drives to locate the noise. Of course, it would be easier to use an ultrasonic device if possible.
    1 point
  32. Yes. I think most on forum would agree. Right, Jeff? Like replacing the old sealed hydraulic chain tensioners with oil pressure tensioners. (That’s for those of us who might have had an air-cooled 911.). I think LE calls it “the solution.”
    1 point
  33. I think they are referring to the flexible disc at the end of the cardan shaft.
    1 point
  34. If the key fits in the lock cylinder and you can turn both left and right, but it feels loose, without any resistance than the circled part in the pic. is probably broken or badly replaced after a previous intervention.
    1 point
  35. Porsche has gone rather stiff necked about adding options post delivery. If memory serves, you have to have the clock, and pay Porsche to recode the car as having both. Most dealers seem to charge the exact amount you would have laid out to have it as a factory option. Not a pretty situation, but then you are dealing with Porsche...…...
    1 point
  36. I can't help with photos, but these diagrams show where the wire is connected at the steering column, and where it runs to on the DME (via a plug/socket).
    1 point
  37. News to me... the only big confusing issue that I know of is the bad engine ground (splice) that caused all sorts of erroneous faults. But there was a TSB with instructions of how to fix that. Any combination of faults for the sensors listed may indicate this ground splice is broken or faulty. Mass air flow implausible (P0068) Intake Manifold pressure sensor (P0069, P0106, P0107, P0108, P1183, P1184) Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor faults (P0116_P0119, P050C, P3081, P3082) Radiator exit Coolant Temperature Sensor faults (P2183_P2186) System too Lean or too Rich (Bank 1 & Bank 2) (P0171_P0175) Oil pressure sensor faults (P0521_P0524) Oil Level sensor faults (P250C, P250D) Oil Temperature sensor faults (P0195, P0197, P0198, P0298) Boost pressure sensor (P1189, P1190, P1637, P1638, P1639) Camshaft position sensor 1 & 2 (P0341_P0349) Crankshaft position sensor (P0335, P0336, P0370_P0373) Engine Compartment temperature sensor (P1154_P1158)
    1 point
  38. mjk: The following are from a late model 986, for reference. The set up should be the same, but you might double check: In this one, I drew in the orientation of the string over the plastic ear. . . Here's the real thing . . . . A view of how it is routed over the tubular part of the frame . . Overall view. . . Make sure that there is still some elasticity in the center elastic band so that it can maintain the proper tension to guide the tension cable into the guide channels. If it has lost all of its elasticity, you can replace it or patch in a short elastic band on each side (to which the looped strings attach). Regards, Maurice.
    1 point
  39. A few points to add from a '99 Cabrio owner in Central Florida. I ran into a couple snags, and wanted to pass my info along in the hopes it'll help someone else out there, and you can plan your weekend morning accordingly. 1. Finding the Right Fluid -- Wasn't as easy as I'd hoped. I went to the two major car part store chains in my area (AutoZone and Discount/Advance Auto Parts) and didn't have any luck finding either John Deere or Pentosin fluid. Ended up going to Bennett Auto Parts (on my way to Tractor Supply, which I assumed had the John Deere) and it turned out Bennett had it and carried the Pentosin CHF 11S for $24 per liter. The Bennett dude told me that NAPA most likely carried it also, but I had no reason to check at that point. 2. Finding Something to Squirt the Fluid into a Tiny Hole -- I actually ended up using one of those poultry-basting syringes that you use to inject marinade into a chicken. I had an extra one lying around. I do recommend you remove the barbeque sauce first, though. 3. Taking Apart Your Car -- The DIY Tutoral was a huge help and I was able to make it through all the steps and make it through all the parts. Well done tutoral, so a kudos to the developer. It all worked well until my next point: 4. What to do if the Previous Owner Was a Bonehead -- After pulling the top back, removing the felt cover, and identifying the reservoir tank and filler hole, something just didn't look right. This job had apparantly been done before, because I'd noticed a few minutes before that a couple plastic trim holders were non-existant, and so too was the copper gasket/washer around the fill plug. Okay, no problem, I'd figured. Until I tried to lefty-loosey the plug with my allen wrench. It had way too much resistance and as I tried to persuade it, I could feel the metal in the allen hole start to give way. Crap. Hit it with some WD-40, let it soak in, and try again. Nope. It stripped the plug. And the fluid was low and causing problems with the pump, so I had to do something. How to refill this little bugger without the plug? Drill through the plug? Nope, not enough room and metal shavings would get in the resivoir. Take the tank off, refill it, and replace it? Couldn't figure out how to get in there without deconstructing the whole back of my daily driver, which I'd need the next morning for work. Take it to the dealer? Sure, if you're not up for a challenge and are made of money. I'm neither. I decided that making a small hole at the top of the resivoir, near the fill line, would do the job. I figured that drilling a hole with a Dremel would end up forcing plastic shavings into the resivoir, which the pump may not like. I decided on heating up a nail and melting a hole in the plastic resivoir. Filled her up, and sealed it up with a hot glue gun. (Tape's not gonna hold with the fluid, and I didn't want to go with a hard epoxy in case I need to refill. I figure a light coating of craft store hot glue, just to seal it, might do the trick. So, to add a few parts to this DIY, you may need: - poultry flavor injector - finishing nail - butane grill lighter - hot glue gun I'm amazed there wasn't any duct tape involved, but you should probably have some on hand, just in case.
    1 point
  40. Sunset Imports is NOT a Rennlist sponsor -- they ARE a RennTech.org sponsor ;)
    1 point
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