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Showing content with the highest reputation since 11/29/2019 in Posts

  1. All of the larger cables are susceptible to this problem. The longer the cable, like to the starter, the worse the problem because their length exacerbates the resistance issue, leading to larger voltage drops. The only real trick to checking each one with either a multimeter or Power Probe unit (Power Probes actually have a specific setting for checking voltage drops, plus the Power Probe's long leads back to the battery make the testing process easier).
    2 points
  2. Porsche "Book Time" to replace both front wheel bearings is 4.7 hours times your shops hourly rate. Porsche "Book Times" are usually a high estimate - an experienced tech can usually do the job in much less. So let the shop quote time - as long as it is under the "Book Time" you are likely good.
    2 points
  3. Looks like the part that goes inside the oil filter canister - to hold the filter in place. Just clean it and then push it back in.
    2 points
  4. Updated parts list (your's is 15 years old). 997.1 rear strut.pdf
    2 points
  5. First of all, LN Engineering's IMS Solution is a LOT more than just an oil feed line; the bearing insert is a solid bearing (no moving parts) with annular oil passages just like the almighty Mezger turbo engines used, the IMS shaft is plugged to prevent oil accumulation and the balance problems associated by running the shaft full of oil, the replacement rear IMS flange is coated with a Diamond like coating for strength and longevity, and the oil feed is sourced at the oil filter to get clean, cool oil rather than where some others have sourced it. Perhaps one of the biggest advantages of the
    2 points
  6. I would first check the one you have to make sure it is not blocked from air flow by debris.
    2 points
  7. Welcome to RennTech , and your English is fine, and much better than our Greek! It probably caused by oil pressure bleeding down from the hydraulic tensioner's in the VarioCam system, which do not cost that much, either in Euros or $.
    2 points
  8. Be aware the most dealer will not share the service records for the vehicle because they legally belong to the previous owner(s), and the dealers are uninclined to track them down and get a legal release.
    2 points
  9. A cooler on the return line from the rack to the pump will probably help.
    2 points
  10. Charge pressure sender Manifold pressure sender
    2 points
  11. A couple of days ago my head unit started cycling off and on every minute or so. I found some posts that these things are notorious for failing so I started looking for a place that would repair it. Luckily I found the Becker office in Saddle Brook NJ, called them, and they emailed me instructions how to fix it. Apparently my XM SAT provider caused the problem. It required a reboot as per below: WARNING It was brought to our attention, that the PCM 3.0 and 3.1 units have been rebooting continuously on a number of Porsche vehicles at the moment. It seems that a signal was s
    2 points
  12. OK, first of all, either twisting wires together and wrapping them with tape, or using wire nuts is totally unacceptable for automotive applications. Both are pathways to shorts and even fires. Wires should be reconnected with crimp connectors at a minimum, with soldering them and then using heat shrink tubing to cover the soldered joints the actual preferred method. Most likely, in the process of doing this swap, you disturbed something, but exactly what is hard to say, particularly as the previous owner used the twisted wire and tape wrap method of connecting things. It is ent
    2 points
  13. Hi guys, I bought my 1999 Porsche 911 C4 Tiptronic back in January and I've been doing little projects on it ever since. I used to have a 2016 Dodge Challenger R/T Scat Pack with a 6.4 liter V8 that I traded in last summer, but I was missing the sports car feeling too much so decided to buy the Porsche. One of the things that stood out to me on the test drive was just how sluggish and unresponsive the Tiptronic gearbox felt compared to the one I had in the Dodge. Since the rest of the car was in very good condition (invoices for every oil change & repair going back to 2003, IMS
    2 points
  14. You should not have to - unless you hooked up the new battery backwards. If the polarity was hooked up correctly then you need to start looking for poor grounds. Starting with the battery cable then chassis grounds.
    2 points
  15. Your stated voltage measurment is weak. You should be testing the primary cables, the large ones running from the battery to the ground and starter, these are the ones that tend to develop internal corrosion. If you are unfamiliar with this test, do a search as this has been covered several times previously. We always load test both the alternator and battery when there is a problem. While this requires a load tester, it verifies that both are capable of delivering both the correct voltage and current (amps) as required.
    2 points
  16. And here it is, already installed and working just fine: Looks awfully empty in there. I guess I have a little bit more of frunk space now 😉 The size comparison is amazing as well as the weight: 26kg the Bosch, 3.3kg the lithium. Considering that I replaced the comfort full electric seats with the 997GT2 seats, and saved about 40kg there, I managed to offset the weight of the Tip when compared with the manual 😉 Disclaimer: neither one of those mods was done to save weight, it's just a positive side-effect.
    1 point
  17. It turns out, the actual sensor itself isn't bad, one of the bushings of the ball and socket connector is completely gone.
    1 point
  18. According to all the related industry literature I've read, and what my shop's legal consul has told me personally, it is a Federally mandated safety system, meaning that if you disable it, or show someone how to disable it, and the vehicle is subsequently involved in an accident, whomever did it (or showed someone how to do it) can be held both criminally and financially liable. And in many states, the vehicle is considered "unsafe" and would not pass local inspection standards. The same thing would apply to removing seat belts or disabling or removing the air bags. Proceed at y
    1 point
  19. This is a belated reply to document the resolution of my car's low voltage problem. Replacing the cable between the alternator and the starter entirely resolved the issue. As JFP correctly noted, apparently the cable I replaced had developed internal corrosion causing an increase in resistance. It's frustrating when a Porsche dealer tells you everything is okay when you know it isn't. Now having the requisite voltage flowing throughout the vehicle is a beautiful thing.
    1 point
  20. I apologize for being late to the party. I am running PS2s in 295/30-18 on my C2 Cab, lowered on B8s and H&R springs. No clearance issues. That said, I wouldn’t do it again. The 295 on a 10” wheel is a bit too much. I noticed the extra sidewall flex almost immediately when pushing the car on corner entry (yes, mine are N spec). I’ll definitely go back to 285 on next change. If you have 11” wheels, 295s should be great. You may not notice, but this was my experience.
    1 point
  21. Front: 235/40ZR x 18 Rear: 295/30ZR x 18 These worked fine on my car (MY99 996 Coupe). My front wheels were 8" not the stock 7.5". I do not think you can go any wider on the front and very little on the rear.
    1 point
  22. I think they are referring to the flexible disc at the end of the cardan shaft.
    1 point
  23. P2198 Lambda correction downstream, bank 1 – rich/lean control limit exceeded Possible fault causes: - Leakage in exhaust system between the two oxygen sensors - Oxygen sensor upstream faulty (contaminated/aged) The most common fault cause is a leakage between the two oxygen sensors, resulting in the sensor downstream measuring more residual oxygen in the exhaust than the sensor upstream.
    1 point
  24. I may have found my solution. After looking at this PelicanParts tutorial on removing the driver's side door panel, it appears that the 16 pin female connector actually connects to a connector inside the door, and the 10 pin connector comes from a line inside the door to that mirror switch in the small panel at the top of the door. Here is a link to the Pelican tutorial: Porsche Cayenne Front Door Panel Removal | 2003-2008 | Pelican Parts DIY Maintenance Article WWW.PELICANPARTS.COM There are quite a few projects that reside behind yo
    1 point
  25. I'm pretty sure the 2" opening will be too small. Here are two pictures taken from the front, but without removing the panel, I can't verify. Let me know if you need me to do that.
    1 point
  26. PET shows that up to 06-11-2016 the LEDs weren't handed, as PET shows one part number for both sides (7PP 919 238) which is now superceded to 7PP 919 238B. £6.06 GBP incl. VAT. I suspect the Touran part I listed is the same, as it just has a different number prefix.
    1 point
  27. I have a 2011 Cayenne S, and both front door security-led’s flash when the alarm is set. Hope this helps.
    1 point
  28. Welcome to RennTech If your DME (what you refer to as an ECU) actually got wet, most of the car would have been under water, so I would not be surprised things aren't working. I assume you are referring to the box under the seat, which is the alarm/immobilizer unit. If that is the case, remove the unit and rinse it out with isopropyl alcohol , which you can get at any grocery or pharmacy. Remove the small fuse on the unit and make sure it did not blow when it got wet. Use a hair dryer to dry out the unit, reassemble and you should be good to go.
    1 point
  29. While the vehicle may contain VW parts, some of them are running Porsche software, which the VCDS cannot even see. Sometimes these modules drop offline when there is a water short, assuming it is not totally dead, the PIWIS should be able to see and communicate with the module, bringing it back online so it can be calibrated. If the PIWIS cannot communicate, you will need a new module, which will need to be coded to the vehicle, which the PIWIS can also do. Just remember, the 911 and Boxster vehicles also carry VW components, but the VCDS is useless with them.
    1 point
  30. Likely a bad pump or leaking lines.
    1 point
  31. I also have a '99 with exact same conditions described. When I start the car after a couple weeks the sounds is there. If I use the car consecutive days the sound is much less or not there at all. From all the reading I have done, the IMS chain tensioner is a possible cause and not addressing it can increase wear on the tensioner paddle. I plan to replace this tensioner soon (pn 99610518059).
    1 point
  32. These cars (specifically Cayenne) seem very sensitive to weak a battery and poor grounds. Whenever I see multiple electrical issues on a Cayenne - that is where I start.
    1 point
  33. Welcome to RennTech The MAF is located in the air intake system. Trace yours and you will find it sticking out.
    1 point
  34. My experience: dido@didotuning.pl e-mail and www.didotuning.pl for the website. They take Paypal and write decent English. My order, shipped, was 185 zloty’s or $50. Got a set from them a year ago. Takes 20 minutes to put them on and they look great.
    1 point
  35. The window on my 99 Boxster was crunching and grinding, as the regulator cable shredded itself. Took the regulator apart to see how it works, and saw that every part of the regulator was fine, except the cable. I trimmed the frayed ends and put it all back in, and it works fine, for now, but I should replace it, as the cable is at 2/3rds strength and more prone to shredding if I missed a strand here or there. Shame to spend $270-$300 for a new regulator to replace a $20 or $30 cable, and I'm reluctant to buy a used one online... Waiting to see if Woody on the 986 forum has a good used one for
    1 point
  36. 1 point
  37. Activating the ABS/PSM pump and control system while bleeding is only required if air has gotten into the control network. During a normal maintenance flush, it is not required.
    1 point
  38. The Boxster has 6 drains to check. They are black and look like little donuts or grommets. There are 2 in the front on either side of the battery and 4 in the back. Raise your clamshell and you will see one at the bottom on either side of the black plastic liner. Easily seen when you have the top part way open and there's also one on either side of the channel almost below the front tip of the clamshell by the door jam. Here is a link to Mike Focke's website with more info regarding Boxster drains. https://sites.google.com/site/mikefocke2/drainsdiagram
    1 point
  39. As for additional information on the PCM, there 'might' be a few things, it will allow for the USB connection as already know but in addition to this the display will show and allow the section of the audio files on the USB making song selection a bit more user friendly. The other thing that has been alluded to but not confirmed is the ability to laod MP3's onto the PCM's hard drive for play back when no auxilary device is attached. The reason I said 'alluded to' is that it is appearently mentioned in the later version of the PCM manual but now one that I know has confirmed this actually works
    1 point
  40. 9) Remove the xenon ballast in the bi-xenon headlights (6 bolts) then disconect the harness, now remove the 5 pins (thin black, thin brown, red, yellow and uncovered ground wire) you only need two wires to turn on the xenon (Strong black and Strong brown) 10) Cut all the wires in the connector (bi-xenon headlight) NEAR to the connector and then use the plastic trick to remove it from the headlight. Take the Halogen connector and use this diagram: PIN 1 - Parking Light Lead (+) PIN 2 - High Beam Adjuster Supply PIN 3 - High Beam Adjuster Sensor PIN 4 - High Beam Adjuster Ground PI
    1 point
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