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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 08/05/2020 in all areas

  1. Some after photos... Definitely took more time cleaning than building this motor....
    3 points
  2. The headlights look fine to me.... people obsessing over headlights and BS like that are what makes the 996TT still one of the best cars out there, pound-for-pound, dollar-for-dollar
    3 points
  3. You can get a set of small "ez out" hex bits, one of which should fit tightly into the bolt head while rotating counter clockwise, which will loosen the stripped fastener. Amazon and others sell them (Amazon screw/bolt extractor set)
    3 points
  4. The factory default for the valves is the loud position, so if they are not hooked up, that is what you get. The valves only move to the "quiet" position when activated. The original reason for the valves was the incredibly restrictive Swiss noise laws for residential neighborhoods, so when the vehicle was operating a low speeds, it was quiet.
    2 points
  5. If you are even considering that, that's because you don't really like the car and should sell it. To me. For cheap.
    2 points
  6. Sometimes when there is a voltage spike to the system (like connecting a new battery) the programming can get "mixed up". When this happens the best thing to do is have a tech/shop with a PIWIS re-program the affected control module(s). I think it very rare to replace a DME if most everything but one or two items are not working.
    2 points
  7. As someone that spent a significant part of his career in the battery business, your use of "assuming the proportions are the same" is more than seriously flawed. The CCA test used by the BCI (Battery Council International, the international technical consortium that sets standards for battery ratings and testing procedures used by battery manufacturers world wide) is very similar to the one used by the SAE (Society of Automotive Engineers); which requires storing the finished and fully charged battery a 0F (-17.8 C) for a period of 24 hours, then load testing it to determine its CCA rating. There is no known "proportioning" formula for determining this value, only hard testing data. Lightweight battery manufacturers have been "inventing" unique rating values and "equivalencies" without a basis in technical facts, and that are really totally meaningless, simply because they know what the outcome of publishing the more widely accepted testing data would be: Their batteries would appear weak compared to conventional SLI (starting, lighting, ignition) batteries.
    2 points
  8. All of the larger cables are susceptible to this problem. The longer the cable, like to the starter, the worse the problem because their length exacerbates the resistance issue, leading to larger voltage drops. The only real trick to checking each one with either a multimeter or Power Probe unit (Power Probes actually have a specific setting for checking voltage drops, plus the Power Probe's long leads back to the battery make the testing process easier).
    2 points
  9. Porsche "Book Time" to replace both front wheel bearings is 4.7 hours times your shops hourly rate. Porsche "Book Times" are usually a high estimate - an experienced tech can usually do the job in much less. So let the shop quote time - as long as it is under the "Book Time" you are likely good.
    2 points
  10. Looks like the part that goes inside the oil filter canister - to hold the filter in place. Just clean it and then push it back in.
    2 points
  11. Updated parts list (your's is 15 years old). 997.1 rear strut.pdf
    2 points
  12. First of all, LN Engineering's IMS Solution is a LOT more than just an oil feed line; the bearing insert is a solid bearing (no moving parts) with annular oil passages just like the almighty Mezger turbo engines used, the IMS shaft is plugged to prevent oil accumulation and the balance problems associated by running the shaft full of oil, the replacement rear IMS flange is coated with a Diamond like coating for strength and longevity, and the oil feed is sourced at the oil filter to get clean, cool oil rather than where some others have sourced it. Perhaps one of the biggest advantages of the Solution is that it never has to be replaced like other IMS retrofits, it is the ONLY permanent fix for IMS related headaches. We have never has any problems with the LN IMS Solution; it simply works, period
    2 points
  13. I would first check the one you have to make sure it is not blocked from air flow by debris.
    2 points
  14. Welcome to RennTech , and your English is fine, and much better than our Greek! It probably caused by oil pressure bleeding down from the hydraulic tensioner's in the VarioCam system, which do not cost that much, either in Euros or $.
    2 points
  15. Be aware the most dealer will not share the service records for the vehicle because they legally belong to the previous owner(s), and the dealers are uninclined to track them down and get a legal release.
    2 points
  16. I agree with millerchris85. After all the work and money poured into my CTT it’s eh now and I’d have been better served tuning up my 996TT. If you really must have a sporty drive in a Cayenne then I suggest looking after a 958 GTS, Turbo or Turbo S and having someone tuned them to your liking. Be forewarned though you will wear through ancillaries (brakes, axles, tensioners, etc...) much faster depending on how much and how hard you drive
    2 points
  17. Your stated voltage measurment is weak. You should be testing the primary cables, the large ones running from the battery to the ground and starter, these are the ones that tend to develop internal corrosion. If you are unfamiliar with this test, do a search as this has been covered several times previously. We always load test both the alternator and battery when there is a problem. While this requires a load tester, it verifies that both are capable of delivering both the correct voltage and current (amps) as required.
    2 points
  18. Eureka! I suppose during the time you guys were typing, I was arriving at the same conclusion. I pulled the latch mechanism out and examined it up-close. The tension spring was out of a pocket on the latch and not providing any push when the latch was released. Hence, the hood could be pulled up out of 'battery' but would not pop up on its own. I disassembled the mechanism, lubed it, and re-inserted the spring into the latch. Put it back together and now all is well. Very simple to do. This is how I did it and you may find it useful. Do so at your own risk, yada yada yada. 1st, open the hood and peel back the carpet cover just inside of the latch. Next, using a flat-head screwdriver, remove the four plastic 'screws' holding the trim plate between the bumper and the hood flange. They merely turn 90 degrees (so that they are perpendicular to the car's direction of travel) and pop out. Then remove the trim piece and place to the side. Next, using a ten millimeter socket, remove the two bolts securing the latch to the car. They are located just inside the trunk under the carpet you just peeled back. Once they are removed, the latch is now only held in place by two metal cables and the alarm pin switch wires. Carefully unplug the alarm wires. Push in on a small 'latch' on the lower half of the plug and pull out the lower half. Then carefully rotate the upper half about 45 degrees (it should be fairly easy to move, don't force it) and the plug will pop out of the metal holder. Then use a small screwdriver to gently push a release clip on the plastic mounting point. This will allow the small plastic mount to separate from the wiring plug. Now you need to gently remove the cables from their sockets. Take the tension off of the upper cable and gently pull the cable up out of its socket. Then remove the lower cable in the same way. The only thing holding the latch in the car now is the alarm wiring harness. Push the rubber grommet through the body toward the bumper. You can then pull the wiring through and the entire latch will come out of the car. Be sure to set the stainless steel shroud to the side. It was not attached on my car but may be on yours. Now that you have the latch out of the car, you can see the large diameter steel spring that is wound around the large post to the passenger side of the latch. That is the culprit. The small plastic shroud over it pulled straight out and off of my latch. This is the microswitch that tells the alarm that the trunk is open or closed. Set it to the side. You should now see the latch mechanism and the hole that the spring needs to be in to function properly. I used two screwdrivers to push the other end of the spring (the end on the release / catch mechanism ) over the catch. This allowed me to push the end into the latch more easily. I then popped the spring back over the catch. Now there should be tension on both the latch and the catch. Lubricate with white lithium grease, or some other semi-solid lubricant and work the mechanism to ensure that it is functioning properly. Once you have confirmed proper function, reassemble in reverse order (i.e. put the alarm switch back on - it should snap right back in place ), pop the cable back on, thread the wiring through and secure the grommet in place, place the stainless shroud on, insert the bolts and loosely tighten things. Once the bolts are in, line up the hood and the latch mechanism and tighten down the latch. Replace the plastic bumper/body trim piece but don't insert the 'screws' until you've tested the hood a couple times. Once it is clear that the hood is functioning properly, secure the trim, replace the carpet and smile at a job well done, for free. If I can figure out how to transfer my pictures out of my camera phone I'll add some illustration to this. Hope this helps. I was frustrated as *)*^*( until y'all help me realize what the problem was. Pictures ...
    2 points
  19. Ok here is the deal with removing these things..... 1. First you must remove Both AC Vents, and the Upper Center Console... The strips are held in from screws behind the dash, but reaching them is a waist of time! 2. The 2 small strips will pop out with some force, just take a flat head screwdriver and tap it in behind the strip. The screws will pop out from the back of the dash... The dash is a hard plastic material and the screw heads are small so they will come right through the dash.. 3. The long piece across the passanger side was fun... Tape the dash will several pieces of tape to protect the dash in case you slip. These pieces have 2 layers to them.. take a flat head screwdriver and open the top part of the stip.. It will look like this once you peel off the top layer..you can see the top of the scew holes after you peel off the top layer Now my stereo installer had the next idea.. he took a small soldering gun like this... and heated up the head of the screw that is seen from the top side.. this made the area around the screw soft, and then I took the screwdriver behind the remaining strip and pried it right off.. it broke off to every screw head.. we just did this right along and 10 minutes later it was all out.. Be sure to not get the solder gun to close the the leather.. just keep it on for about 30 seconds.. it really is helpful if one guy holds the solder gun while the other removes the strip. The top piece is the stripped piece.. the bottom is the whole piece that was pulled out from the middle. Installing the new pieces was simple, a little silicone behind them helped the stay in place but its not needed..
    2 points
  20. Note: Part numbers sometimes change without notice. Always double check with your supplier that you have the latest part numbers. (Special thanks to Chuck Jones for being the guinea pig and for taking the photos.) Parts you will need: 997.624.113.00 Actuator Tools you will need: Very short Torx T20 driver and right angle ratchet or tool to use the short T20 in a very confined space Regular screwdriver, phillips screw driver, and 10 mm wrench to remove th wheel well liner 1. Jack the car so that right front wheel is off the ground and secure it with a jack stand. Remove the right front wheel. 2. Remove the wheel well liner by removing the the plastics rivets (pry them out with a regular screwdriver). As well remove the 10 mm nuts on each side of the axle. Now remove the phillips screws that fasten the wheel well liner under the front bumper and remove the wheel well liner (and set aside). 3. Locate the EVAP canister and remove the electrical connection at the top of the canister. Now remove the 10 mm nut that holds the canister in place. Remove gas the vapor lines - one at the top and one at the bottom (again by squeezing the connectors). Remove the EVAP canister by pulling gently back and forth until it releases from the rubber gromments 4. Look back up under the fender (now that the canister is out of the way) and locate the broken actuator. Now using the stubby Torx T-20 loose (but do not remove) the two T-20 screws. The actuator itself is a bit tough to get to and you will need a really short T-20 Torx head to loosen the two screws. I say loosen because that is all you need to do to remove the part - it sits in two "U" shaped slots. Remove the electrical connector (by squeezing the tab). Here is a pic of the new part - as you see the Torx screws are already in place so that is all you have to do to replace it. 5. Put the new part in place making sure you feed the emergency pull line through the fender to its location in the door jam. There is room to slide it through the side so you don't need to try and thread it through the hole. Fasten the two Torx screws and reconnect the electrical connector. Chuck's car had the guide rose guide piece missing (so he needed to order one) Here is a pic of his car (without guide rose) and my car (with guide rose). Ref. P/N 997.624.505.00 We also noticed that on his car the plastic catch for the lock was missing (so he needed to order that too). Here is a pic of his car (without cap) and my car (with cap). Ref. P/N 996.201.243.00 6. Reinstall the EVAP canister by pushing it into place on the rubber gromments. Then reattach the vapor lines (they should snap back into place) and the electrical connection. Finally put the 10 mm nut back in place and tighten down. 7. Reinstall the wheel well liner (reverse of removal). 8. Mount the tire, lower the car and re-torque the wheel bolts. Done.
    2 points
  21. He's not misinforming people. His statements are corroborated by industry and academic research. If you are interested Lake Speed, Charles Navarro, and Jake Raby have done a lot of publishing on this topic. Not all oils are equal just because they are on an approved list and in fact if you look at virgin oil analysis they vary widely in their composition. Oil companies have to pay to be listed and the process isn't as objective, or "formal" as you put it, as you might think. Viscosity is just one of many variables. I started studying this about a year ago when I discovered my timing chain was severely "stretched" and I can tell you that I have come to the same conclusion independently. Anyway, for all the people with knowledge about cars on the internet John has probably exhibited the least self promotion of anyone I have ever seen (he owned a shop but I couldn't even tell you what the name was because he never mentioned it to drum up any business). So that comment is not valid if not laughable. If you've been around long enough what's special about JPF is he's not just another mechanic that thinks he knows better. He only did the mechanic thing as a late act in his career; he was a suit and tie organic chemist who happened to be good at working on Porsches. If you've been around here long enough you have probably seen that every person that tried to take him deep on something came up dry.....every time. His reasoning is always sound and adds up no matter how far you drill and tribology is no different. If you keep reading and have a scientific mind (ie. you're not the type of person that enters a conversation with their mind already made up) I'm confident you will change your view. If you ever saw what goes on at the top of every Fortune 500 company I can promise you they are driven by bean counting and marketing. To think otherwise is either naïve or maybe you have never worked for one of these companies. Happy Memorial Day weekend
    1 point
  22. Just go to your name at the top right then choose Account Settings - then Signature.
    1 point
  23. P1133 Lambda control adaptation FRAU (lower load range) - below limit value or above limit value Possible fault causes - Incorrect main filling signal from hot-film mass air flow meter - Fuel pressure too high - Injection valve faulty (dripping) - Tank vent faulty (does not close completely) or Possible fault causes - Intake system leaking (secondary air) - Incorrect main filling signal from hot-film mass air flow meter - Leak in exhaust system - Fuel pressure too low - Fuel injector faulty (stuck) - Fuel pump delivery too low P1126 Lambda control adaptation FRAU (lower load range) - below limit value or above limit value Same as above (P1133) P2177, P2187, P2179 Same as above
    1 point
  24. First of all, these transmissions are very sensitive to the lubricant used; over the years, we have had numerous cars come into the shop with everything from noise complaints to poor shifting issues (particularly in the cold), and for the most part everyone was cured by thoroughly draining the lube out of the gearbox and then refilling with the factory fluid. Most people do not realize that Porsche factory lube, which is a full synthetic, is produced to Porsche specs, and does not conform to aftermarket product specs. At one time, we inquired of several major lube companies if they had an exact match product, and were uniformly told that, “No, Porsche uses a unique specification lubricant, and the brand market is too small for us to produce a similar product.” That said, even the factory fill cannot correct existing wear issues, or mechanical issues. Second gear pop out is a well known problem which can often be corrected by installing an updated detent part like the Gbox fix.
    1 point
  25. Then using the basic rule to always go back to the last thing you worked on, the intake plenum.
    1 point
  26. That car is utterly gorgeous, congratulations! I owned one in the same colour for two years in London. Get the bolts that connect all of the exhaust system checked for rust. It's very expensive to fix later on and always happens. I would change them all every 3 or 4 years, consider better non OEM ones if you're not worried about maintaining the Porsche warranty. Also replacing the seals between the front and back side windows made mine feel like a new car as the glass didn't wobble. A cheap but satisfying fix. Made the car feel like new again. Enjoy! Sent from my SM-N976B using Tapatalk
    1 point
  27. Update! So I decided to start by check the driver's side, and boy am I glad I did (since the pressured line on the passenger side is such a mess to remove)-- it seems that when getting the filter seated last night, I somehow managed to have one of the electrical connectors going to the filter (the black and red cables) came unplugged!! 🙄🙄 She's alive!! 🙂
    1 point
  28. First off, cool post. Holy cow though, 600 Euros? I didn't realize the Bosch AGM was that much too, that's super expensive. I also just replaced my battery recently -- the original Varta AGM in my 2014 vehicle -- with an Optima Yellow-Top, which costs $250 USD and I was thinking that was pricey. You can get a DieHard Platinum AGM (apparently all the AGM's here are Johnson Controls anyway) here for about $175. The AGM batteries do last longer than conventional lead acid (with other cool benefits like no spill, vibration resistance, etc) and my 7 year old Varta probably could have made it longer, I've seen people with 10 years or more on them, but like you I also value not getting stranded. I got stranded many years ago in a blizzard in the middle of nowhere as the battery in my first BMW after college died as I was going up a hill. When I think about that experience I'm also happy to pay up a little for a battery as insurance (especially with my wife and kids in the car). To that end I've been really happy with the Yellow Top. My car starts very strong even as it has started to get colder here some days...and it's never a problem when my kids are in the car with the ignition off playing with the sunroof and all the other electronics. So far I would definitely buy an Optima again. Keep this thread updated later. Thanks for a fun post, this was a nice read.
    1 point
  29. And here it is, already installed and working just fine: Looks awfully empty in there. I guess I have a little bit more of frunk space now 😉 The size comparison is amazing as well as the weight: 26kg the Bosch, 3.3kg the lithium. Considering that I replaced the comfort full electric seats with the 997GT2 seats, and saved about 40kg there, I managed to offset the weight of the Tip when compared with the manual 😉 Disclaimer: neither one of those mods was done to save weight, it's just a positive side-effect. I bought the Bosch about 5 years ago and it served me very well but it was no longer holding a charge and I had to have it on the tender overnight, going to sleep with 12.6 and waking up with 12.2 if off it. After a couple of days not running and off-tender, it was down to 12V. It was still starting ok but I guess it was a matter of time and as I hate being left stranded, decided to replace it. After having a look at all possibilities, Yuasa YBX9xxx, same-model Bosch (which is an AGM 95Ah 850A now) and top of the range Bosch S6, I ended up with lithium, after my excellent experience with my bike's lithium battery. With a nice Black Friday deal, I got this for about 600€, which is 3 times as much as a S5A13 and in the same price range as a S6 AGM. With the manufacturer states a duration of 3 to 5 times a lead acid. I hope so but don't really count on it: 15 to 25 years out of a starter battery? But let's see, battery duration is always a question mark, with the Porsche Moll ones never having lasted me more than 3 years and costing about half of this lithium.
    1 point
  30. Just take the bulb out.
    1 point
  31. Hi everyone, I have a 1973 Porsche 911 T with Targa top issues. The safety latch on the driver's side got stuck and I stripped or broke off the receptor for the release handle. I am unable to remove the top now (haven't tried the wire release trick yet). I am looking for someone in the Chicago area who can do repair and restoration on the Targa top.
    1 point
  32. What you should be doing is running a voltage drop across the primary cables; anything more than 0.5 V means the cables need to be replaced.
    1 point
  33. Undo fastening screws 1. To reduce the unclipping forces and thereby the risk of damage during removal, the removal steps must be carried out at the accessible connection points using a suitable tool. Unclip trim panel for spring strut mount 2 first upwards Arrows A and then pull out slightly in direction of Arrow B. Check fastening nuts 1 and clamps 2, 3, and replace if necessary.
    1 point
  34. Car is up running 100% and enjoyed 5x more. When I have some time I will do a write up with pics and DIY info too.
    1 point
  35. 991 S (both C2S and C4S) Front new: 34 mm minimum (after machining): 32.6 mm wear limit: 32.0 mm Rear new: 28 mm minimum (after machining): 26.6 mm wear limit: 26.0 mm
    1 point
  36. News to me... the only big confusing issue that I know of is the bad engine ground (splice) that caused all sorts of erroneous faults. But there was a TSB with instructions of how to fix that. Any combination of faults for the sensors listed may indicate this ground splice is broken or faulty. Mass air flow implausible (P0068) Intake Manifold pressure sensor (P0069, P0106, P0107, P0108, P1183, P1184) Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor faults (P0116_P0119, P050C, P3081, P3082) Radiator exit Coolant Temperature Sensor faults (P2183_P2186) System too Lean or too Rich (Bank 1 & Bank 2) (P0171_P0175) Oil pressure sensor faults (P0521_P0524) Oil Level sensor faults (P250C, P250D) Oil Temperature sensor faults (P0195, P0197, P0198, P0298) Boost pressure sensor (P1189, P1190, P1637, P1638, P1639) Camshaft position sensor 1 & 2 (P0341_P0349) Crankshaft position sensor (P0335, P0336, P0370_P0373) Engine Compartment temperature sensor (P1154_P1158)
    1 point
  37. For what it's worth. I had similar symptoms with no codes. Disconnected both MAFS (it did then throw two codes) and the car ran fine. Cleaned both MAFS, reconnected and all was well. Cheers!
    1 point
  38. I got a PM where someone asked the dimensions of my tool, here it is. Print the image and give it to a person who can drill the tool out of nylon or something similar (strong but softer than metal). First check my image and then when fabricating the tool, make sure that the - first dimension is <105mm - second dimension is >85mm - third dimension is >43mm - first depth is 13mm - second depth is at least 13mm + 6mm You also have to drill a hole for the pin, paint pin and then try to fit the tool and you'll see which place to drill. How much over or under you wish to go depends on how good drill you have, but I'd use 0.2mm difference to ensure it fits reasonably easy and that the extraction is also easy. When using such tool, I'd advise using clean gloves and clean crankcase surfaces with isopropyl alcohol. Do not apply anything else, e.g. grease or such, latest RMS itself has PTFE coating and you should not touch it with bare hands. Correct installation depth is 13mm from the face of the crankshaft where the flywheel mates to the crank when using latest model of RMS (in my case I used 997-101-212-01-M17) as of the date when this message was written. Before you start tapping RMS in with this custom tool, try to set it as level as possible to the crank with your both hands (use gloves) and push it as deep as it goes with ease. Then tap it in from the center. I'd suggest you check how it goes in by using caliper every now and then. At least I had to tap a bit to non center position to get it in level to 13mm depth. (edited wording on correct installation depth, thanks JFP) Best of luck!
    1 point
  39. This has been covered before, but it can be done using a 4" diameter plastic pipe coupler (has a ridge half way down the inside that the old flywheel bolt heads can rest on, then tighten slowly in a crosswise pattern to pull it in evenly.) The trick to getting the new design PTFE seal to work where the older design did not is being absolutely scrupulously clean, not even finger prints on any parts, and no sealant of any kind. You also have to install it at an unusual depth, 13MM from the flywheel mating surface of the crank, not 14MM.
    1 point
  40. You could use -47, or -53, or -55, or -61. All will still require Durametric or Porsche PST2 or PIWIS tester for specialized bleeding of the new (or used) unit.
    1 point
  41. I would add the following to help others attempting this ... please read the above and the below completely BEFORE starting your work. You'll thank yourself ! Getting the tank out I'd remove the air pump instead of tying it to the side as above. Its very simply and takes 30-40 seconds. It gives you room you REALLY need. Plus you won't break the air hose by bending it too much. NOTE: There are two screws that hold the air pump in place - at the bottom. In my case I found out that the nut thse screws go into had fallen off during removal. The nuts are 'suspended' in a rubber tube and age/temperature had made the rubber brittle and the nut had just fallen when I took the screw out. I simply got new speed nuts (2x : part number: 999.500.078.00 : $2) and used them to fit the air pump back again. Its worth taking the air pump off even if you now need to buy $2 more of nuts when ordering your tank - it gives you a lot of room you need ! To remove the coolant reservoir easily out of its harness, slide it towards the engine (i.e. move right) by around 1/2 to 1 inch. Then move it DOWN and out of its rail/holder. There is no need to slide it COMPLETELY (3-4") towards the engine completely as it first appears. The railings have tabs and gaps to facilitate such removal/installation. You probably won't even have that much room to slide it out completely ! When draining the coolant from below the car, you'll need a bucket to keep most of the coolant and may need to empty the tray below into the bucket. Use 2 trays so you can empty one when the other is below the car. The coolant drains fast, so you can't use just one without making a mess. Also, there is a lot of coolant, almost a bucketfull. Coolant is a corrosive liquid - keep it off the paint. If you drop some on the paint, don't panic, just wipe it off with water and a cloth. Use gloves if possible. The drain plug for the coolant is close to the rear bumper, don't search too deep inside near the transmission etc ! There is a coolant level sensor at the bottom of the coolant tank. Its deep and tough to see and you may break it manupulating the tank of get it out of the engine compartment. I'd recommend you reach down and remove it as follows. - when reachable, turn the sensor by 1/4 turn from towards you to towards the engine. - pull the sensor out from the bottom (it needs 2" to fall out, its 2.5" tall). - keep it somewhere ! If you do break it (likely), its around 10-18 bucks, so don't panic ! Lastly, be patient in getting the tank out. Its not difficult but simply time consuming. Be careful not to bend/break other hoses while you try getting the coolant tank out. Putting the new tank back in place When installing the new tank, I found it easy to first install the sensor at the bottom and then twist-lock it (1/4 turn). The electrical connection should point towards the right taillight. First try to get the entire tank in the volume reserved for it in the engine compartment. Don't try to directly fit it in. Make sure you don't leave any tubes/connectors behind the tank during installation. The last think after installation is to realise you need to get it out to rescue a forgotten tube. Now you want to get the tank back in its harness. The harness' as well as the tank's railings have gaps to ease removal/installation. What worked good for me was rotate the tank anti-clockwise by 10-20 degrees when inside the cavity/volume of engine compartment position the right most tab of the tank sticking out of the harness while keeping the other two tabs (on the tank's top) positioned to fall in the gaps between the harness' tabs. Try feeling the gaps with your finger to know where the tank's tabs should land. Slide a 1.5" diameter metal tube at the bottom (running front -> back) slightly to the left (or right?) so that the level sensor wouldn't be obstructed upon rotation. It should gently slide out of its holder. Now level the tank (i.e. rotate it clockwise by 10-20 degrees). The tank's tabs should have fallen where the harness' gaps are and the tank will be one tab sticking out (out = towards the engine) Finally move the tank gently away from the engine, in its final installed position [*] Slide the metal pipe back into its clamp [*] Connect everything else just the reverse as removal. After everything is installed Once you have the new tank in place, you will need to refill it with coolant and 'bleed' the coolant system. Fill the coolant tank with existing/new (porsche recommended) coolant to the max level and close the coolant tank lid. I simply filtered my existing coolant with a old (but clean) cotton t-shirt and poured it in using a funnel. Then, to quote Loren, "Lift the bleed valve." "Start the engine and allow it to get to full operating temperature (I also ran the air conditioning to force circulation). The coolant warning light will likely start to flash. Shut the engine off and WAIT until the engine and coolant has cooled enough to remove the coolant tank cap. Then add coolant to the tank and repeat the process. You made need to do this 2-3 times. When the coolant level fails to fall then the system is bled and you can close the bleeder valve." About bleeding the coolant system. Close the bleeder value after about 40 minutes (total) of good driving. You shouldn't ride with it open for more than this (my Porsche tech told me this). You MUST wait for the coolant to cool between your 2-3 tries, else you won't be filling the tank completely (coolant contracts as it cools). I've had to wait for over 3 hours to cool. If you try before this then the coolant will spill off when you open the cap. You may get a coolant light even with the bleeder valve closed after a few days. This is ok and doesn't mean you cracked your tank or something again. Basically there was some air trapped and the car "burped" it into the coolant reservoir, triggering off the coolant light. Wait for 4 hours for the car to cool and then top off with coolant+water (replacing a lot) or just water (replacing just a little). If even after 3-4 top offs/"burps" you need to keep adding coolant, have it checked for other leaks in the coolant system. In the end, once you've done it, please pat yourself on the back !! Great job :thumbup: !! Even my service tech. at the local dealership said its not a simple job. Its worth doing it on your own if you suspect you're losing coolant. :cheers: Sid
    1 point
  42. The Tiptronic transmission has a special tool for fluid. First you have to purchase the tool (expensive) or make one (inexpensive). The tool is the V.A.G.1924, runs about $300. You need the following tools and parts to start: 1. ATF fill tool 2. 7 (US) Quarts of Pennzoil Multi-Vehicle ATF 3. Torque wrench for 60 ft lbs 4. Torque wrench for 7.5 ft lbs (90 in lbs) 5. 17 mm allen bit 6. 8 mm allen bit 7. Torx 27 bit 8. Temperature meter with probe. I used an Oregon Scientific with a probe that has a 10 ft cord. 9. Porsche part 986 397 016 00 Paper gasket (Call Sunset Porsche, great guys) 10. Porsche part 986 307 403 00 ATF filter 11. Porsche part 986 397 016 00 rubber ring for fill plug 12. Kitty liter, you will spill 13. Socket set 14. Plenty of rags 15. Oil catch pan 16. Safety goggles First we assemble the filling tool out of parts you can find in Lowes or Home Depot type of homestores: 1. Hudson 1 gallon tank ($9.95) 2. Barbed fittings and 8 ft of tygon 3/8 clear hose. 3. 1/4 inch shut off valve - brass 4. 12 inch of flexible copper tube, 1/4" 5. Assemble as shown below and bend the tube per the picture. The steps are easy to follow: 1. Lift car off the ground and on jack stands. I need 16 inches on the stands to be comfortable. 2. Slide oil catch pan under fluid pan and remove drain plug with 8 mm allen bit 3. Remove the cross arm that traverses the fluid pan. Loosen only one bolt, remove the other. It will be easier for the next step and you can prop the arm to help catch the pan when the bolts are removed. 4. When the fluid has drained, secure drain plug back in and torque to 30 ft lbs. 5. Using the Torx 27 bit, remove all the screws crosswise. Move the cross arm out of the way as needed, but put back in a place where the pan will not fall. THE PAN STILL HAS FLUID in it, be careful 6. Remove pan carefully. The green gasket should still be attached to it. 7. Remove the two screws that hold the filter in place. Make sure the oil catch pan is underneath, the filter will have fluid as well. Remove filter. 8. Thinly coat some petroleum jelly on the suction collar of the ATF filter and install filter 9. Install new filter and screw the two screws to a torque of 4.5 ft lbs. 10. Empty the filter pan into the oil catch pan with all the waste oil. Place the filter pan on a flat surface and remove the gasket. 11. Set the plastic guard cap so the two windows are facing sideways. The holes will be used later for the fill tube and for the temperature probe. Notice how large they are. 12. Use the rags to clean the pan and the magnets in the pan. Set the magnets back to their original location. Here is a nice clean pan and magnets. 13. Place the new gasket on the pan. I used petroleum jelly thin coat on a few places to hold it in place. 14. Fit ATF pan back into transmission, tighten the screws crosswise to 7.5 ft lbs. It may be convenient to use the cross arm as a resting place while you re-attach the pan. 15. Remove the fill plug with the 17 mm allen key. Replace the ring gasket with the new one. 16. Fill the pressure tank with ATF fluid, make sure the valve is closed. Pump the tank to provide the pressure to move the fluid. The clear hose will show the red fluid filling it, and also you will see it running later. 17. Insert the "hook" end of the copper tube into the fill hole, and hook it into one of the holes mentioned before. Insert the temperature probe into the other hole, make sure it is secured. 18. Open the valve and let the ATF fluid begin to flow. You will have to add more fluid to the tank and keep it pumped. When the fluid begins to escape through the hole. It will drip, so close the valve. 19. Start the car. Open the valve to let more fluid into the ATF pan. Keep it pumped. Look at the temperature display on your probe. The temperature should not exceed 45 C. It begins at room temperature, so you got a few minutes. 20. Move the selector to position "P" and let idle for a a few seconds. When the fluid begins to emerge again from the filler tube, close the filling valve. 21. The engine should still be idling, keep an eye on the temp probe. With the brake pedal on, change the transmission through each position, holding the position for 10 seconds. 22. Open fill valve again until ATF fluid escapes from the hole. Make sure the temperature is higher than 30 C, and should be around 40C by now. Remove temperature probe and filler tube. 23. Replace the filler plug and torque to 59 ft lbs. 24. Turn engine off, and take car out for a test. :drive: 25. You are done, check for leaks, clean the spills (cat litter), and enjoy some smooth shifting.
    1 point
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