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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 09/22/2019 in all areas

  1. This DIY tutorial covers how to remove the intake manifold on the 3.6L V6 Cayenne. Removing the intake manifold gives you access to several parts of the engine that you may need to service. Disclaimer: Perform at your own risk. This is for reference only, I am not responsible for any damage/injuries that may occur from this procedure. Please do not attempt if you are not comfortable with doing work on your car or working around the fuel system. Work in a well ventilated area as you will be releasing a small amount of gas and fumes. Difficulty: 5/10 Estimated Time:
    3 points
  2. First off - thanks to everyone who has been down this road before me for providing tips and suggestions and troubleshooting regarding this common problem. I have been dealing with a key that would stay all the way to the right upon starting meaning that the A/C, heated seats and some other items would not function. My solution had been to simply start the car and then just move the key back one notch to the left and everything worked fine. So if others have that issue, my original solution will work but obviously the problem remains and at some point you may end up stranded if the ignitio
    3 points
  3. I would first check the one you have to make sure it is not blocked from air flow by debris.
    2 points
  4. Welcome to RennTech , and your English is fine, and much better than our Greek! It probably caused by oil pressure bleeding down from the hydraulic tensioner's in the VarioCam system, which do not cost that much, either in Euros or $.
    2 points
  5. Be aware the most dealer will not share the service records for the vehicle because they legally belong to the previous owner(s), and the dealers are uninclined to track them down and get a legal release.
    2 points
  6. A cooler on the return line from the rack to the pump will probably help.
    2 points
  7. Charge pressure sender Manifold pressure sender
    2 points
  8. A couple of days ago my head unit started cycling off and on every minute or so. I found some posts that these things are notorious for failing so I started looking for a place that would repair it. Luckily I found the Becker office in Saddle Brook NJ, called them, and they emailed me instructions how to fix it. Apparently my XM SAT provider caused the problem. It required a reboot as per below: WARNING It was brought to our attention, that the PCM 3.0 and 3.1 units have been rebooting continuously on a number of Porsche vehicles at the moment. It seems that a signal was s
    2 points
  9. OK, first of all, either twisting wires together and wrapping them with tape, or using wire nuts is totally unacceptable for automotive applications. Both are pathways to shorts and even fires. Wires should be reconnected with crimp connectors at a minimum, with soldering them and then using heat shrink tubing to cover the soldered joints the actual preferred method. Most likely, in the process of doing this swap, you disturbed something, but exactly what is hard to say, particularly as the previous owner used the twisted wire and tape wrap method of connecting things. It is ent
    2 points
  10. Hi guys, I bought my 1999 Porsche 911 C4 Tiptronic back in January and I've been doing little projects on it ever since. I used to have a 2016 Dodge Challenger R/T Scat Pack with a 6.4 liter V8 that I traded in last summer, but I was missing the sports car feeling too much so decided to buy the Porsche. One of the things that stood out to me on the test drive was just how sluggish and unresponsive the Tiptronic gearbox felt compared to the one I had in the Dodge. Since the rest of the car was in very good condition (invoices for every oil change & repair going back to 2003, IMS
    2 points
  11. You should not have to - unless you hooked up the new battery backwards. If the polarity was hooked up correctly then you need to start looking for poor grounds. Starting with the battery cable then chassis grounds.
    2 points
  12. The Tiptronic transmission has a special tool for fluid. First you have to purchase the tool (expensive) or make one (inexpensive). The tool is the V.A.G.1924, runs about $300. You need the following tools and parts to start: 1. ATF fill tool 2. 7 (US) Quarts of Pennzoil Multi-Vehicle ATF 3. Torque wrench for 60 ft lbs 4. Torque wrench for 7.5 ft lbs (90 in lbs) 5. 17 mm allen bit 6. 8 mm allen bit 7. Torx 27 bit 8. Temperature meter with probe. I used an Oregon Scientific with a probe that has a 10 ft cord. 9. Porsche part 986 397
    2 points
  13. Sorry, but the 2002-2004 Boxster S engine was a 3.2L, not a 3.6L. later models got a 3.4L engine, but there were no 3.6L M96/97 Boxsters from the factory, although there was a 3.8L 9A1 engine in 2015-2016 "Spyder" model. You can interchange 3.2 and 3.4 cylinder heads within certain bounds and caveats: Both engines need to have the same cam drive systems (chain styles and number of chains varied over model years). 986 1997–1999 2.5 L (2,480 cc) 204 PS (150 kW; 201 bhp) 245 N⋅m (181 lbf⋅ft) water-cooled DOHC 24-valve Boxer flat-six "M96.20" 2000–2002 2.7 L (2,68
    1 point
  14. Engine number is on the drivers side next to the oil sump pan...like this. You are correct. 2000 was a transition year for the IMSB from the dual row bearing to the smaller single row bearing. As far as I know, on a 2000, there is no way to know whether it has a dual row or single row bearing by using the engine number. If it were me, I would just plan on having the LN IMS Solution installed as soon as possible. No sense in pulling the bearing and replacing with another bearing that will need to replaced again in 36-40K miles.
    1 point
  15. My key stopped working over 10 years ago. Does not work to lock/unlock car. New battery in key fob did nothing, however the key fob red light does blink. It just doesn't communicate with the car. I figure the key circuit board is broken based on what I have read. Been using the manual key in the door lock ever since. No problem.
    1 point
  16. FWIW if you are looking for a sportier drive, you probably have the wrong car. I did put secondary cat deletes on mine and am very happy with the results, but it is just a bit more noise and response. But it drives and handles like the 5000lb+ SUV that it is, albeit with plenty of grunt. It remains quiet and comfortable which is great for passengers and road trips. Plus I want to keep the rear diff and trans intact as long as possible. Lastly, beware getting a cheap tune; you really want to go with someone that will double check your fueling and
    1 point
  17. Check your battery health and your grounds.
    1 point
  18. I have a 2011 Cayenne S, and both front door security-led’s flash when the alarm is set. Hope this helps.
    1 point
  19. Thanks, I will have a go during lock-down, gives me something to do!
    1 point
  20. Signs of a dying crank position sensor, they get heat soaked and quit, come back to life when cooled off.
    1 point
  21. Anyone wanting to rebuild this engine would first need to have the cases re-sleeved, which is going to set you back a ton of $, and then you would need to drop another $10-12K to just do a stock style rebuild. Something like this would not be for the faint of heart or wallet.......................
    1 point
  22. If the sensors are going to be changed out, a good penetrating oil should not be an issue. If they are going to be reused, I would heat the sensor bung with a torch before pulling on the wrench. In either case, a very small amount of anti seize on the threads of the sensor before installation is a wise move to avoid future maintenance issues.
    1 point
  23. Okay so for anyone following this thread problem solved! Smoked the engine and found big leaks between the MAFs and the intercoolers and again at the plenum before the throttle body. New seals replaced leaky pipes and hoses and voila! No more codes no boost leaks power drops and hesitation and smoother shifting too
    1 point
  24. I replaced them with LEDs no worries....but the thing I need to fix is the strip of LEDs across the top of the tail light...any idea how to?
    1 point
  25. Excess fuel, Mass air flow sensor dirty, engine temperature sensor faulty, dirty air filters, oxygen sensor faulty. Then go on to check fuel pressure and related items. All engines have blow by and it would be expected the blow by gas will be rich in UN-burnt fuel and oil mist in your case. The AOS will have oil around it including the hose, so when the crankcase has a little pressure then the valve will work sending the oil rich gas to the intake to be burnt ( causing carbon build up on intake valve stems, but that's another story). Look at how the engine knows the cor
    1 point
  26. Hi Fixxxer, Save your files as PNGs. Images need not be larger than 1280x720 at 72dpi. Photoshop will allow you to save "small" PNGs. If you don't have Photoshop, there are a ton of free small stand-alone 3rd party applications that will truncate PNGs. Looking forward to seeing your tutorial!
    1 point
  27. You will need to find a salvage yard for internal light parts as Porsche only sells the whole assembly.
    1 point
  28. Lol, and to think I was expecting a picture of a BMW. Still in the family!
    1 point
  29. It is normal to hear more air flow noises with aftermarket filters. You could always test by putting the OEM filters back in.
    1 point
  30. Probably either a loose connection or the leveling servo is out. You should be able to activate the system with the Durametric or PIWIS and see what is going on.
    1 point
  31. Guys, enough with the weird work around Magiver repairs; if you cannot drill the bolt and remove it, you need to drill out the insert and install a new one, but this time put some antiseize on the fasteners and this will never happen again.
    1 point
  32. I was lucky enough to get a hold of 2 944's for $300. 1985 turbo which is my project. And a 1987 which is my parts car. Sent from my SM-N920T using Tapatalk
    1 point
  33. Cs can be done without engine removed
    1 point
  34. I installed matching speed yellow seat belts today, and very happy with the result. (As usual, my stealer wants $300+ just for labor, but it turned out to be less than 20 mins job including taking pictures) It was easy enough, 3 bolts each side. 0. Here is my Christmas gift, colored seat belts. 1. Disconnect the battery! 2. remove side-lining panel 2-1. remove a small screw outside 2-2 & 2-3 there are two plastic bolt & hook, shake it a little to find them and pop them out. (a little different from 986) 3. There are 3 hex
    1 point
  35. These rubber "accordians" can crack over time. Fortunately the rubber piece is only around $60, and can be replaced easily. You'll need to set aside about an hour and a half if you haven't done this before. Tools needed: Flat-bladed screwdriver 4mm allen wrench Ratchet with short extension and 10mm socket Parts needed: The bellows Two plastic expanding fasteners (might come with the bellows) First, deploy your spoiler manually, and shut off the ingnition. No need to disconnect the battery. You will see, along the rear edge, four caps, as seen below.
    1 point
  36. Hi I ordered a PIWIS 2 kit a couple of weeks ago. I finally got round today to connecting it to car and having a play around for the first time and familiarising myself with the menus and functions. Ran through all the headings 1. Fault Memory 2. Actual Values input signals 3. Drive Links checks 4. Coding Adaptations 5. Maintenance repairs and 6. Programming. And then I made a mistake, I was about to finish and out of curiosity I on the programming menu I selected Auto programming and ran it. It starting running but then the installation aborted. The cars modules seemed to have
    1 point
  37. Strange, we still get them with the coating, but then we buy them in bulk. In any case, the rule of thumb is simple: Anything that rotates, vibrates, is time consuming to get at, or can come flying out if the bolts come loose will benefit from Loctite. As I noted earlier, we Loctite flywheel and pressure plate bolts on every make of car, you really do not want these to come loose. The axle flange bolts are an excellent example, we find loose ones all the time. Loctite is cheap, repairing a car that has had a pressure plate or flywheel come loose is not.
    1 point
  38. I had heard this urban legend that you can repair door dings and dents by rubbing dry ice over the dent and then heating it with a hair dryer or heat gun. It seemed simple enough, so I decided to try it on the wife's urban assault vehicle which has its fair share of door dings. I went over to our neighborhood grocery store and got 2 pounds of dry ice for $3. Here is the what the test door looked like before the test. Essentially the process is to take some dry ice (while wearing gloves, as it is very, very cold), and simply run the dry ice back and forth over the dent until the metal has c
    1 point
  39. For me, to work around the compressor lines and engine temp sensor, a wobble or flex socket adapter does the trick. Coupled with the right size socket (can't be too deep or too fat). What has worked well on that rear bolt is a small 1/4" drive 13mm socket (not too fat or too deep, but fits snugly onto the bolt and pretty much butts up right against the A/C lines), plugged into a 1/4" flex socket, plugged into a 3/8" adapter, plugged into a 3/8" extension and finnally into the wrench poking out just above the intake.
    1 point
  40. A real check for a mechanical diff is to lift the rear, and rotate a wheel. If the other wheel rotates too, but in the opposite direction, then it has a mechanical locking diff. I added a Guards 60/40 LSD to my 986S racecar. There are certain turns at certain tracks with poor rear grip (Homestead Miami Speedway for example) where the LSD kicks in a lot. The Boxster race cars in the Grand Am Sports Car Challenge ST Class are also using this same diff. If anyone else is thinking of adding a diff for track use, the Grand Am guys tested both the 80/20 and the 60/40. The 80/20 caused excess
    1 point
  41. 2003 Boxster - Purchased new in December '02 with mileage from the Port to my dealer here in So Cal (17 miles). I just changed my oil at 135,000 miles yesterday. I've only performed standard maintenance and do most of it myself: Oil and Filter (Amsoil 5W-40/Mahle Filter) every 15K Front Brakes - 60K Drive Belt - 60K Front and Rear Brakes - 120K Drive Belt - 120K Clutch as not been replaced on the vehicle. I have had to have my key reprogrammed on a couple of occasions over the years. I also had to purchase the shroud that must be removed to fill the transaxle twice due to roa
    1 point
  42. Hello all just thought I would close out this thread by reporting the resolution to my problem. Turns out there were multiple underlying causes to the symptoms I reported at the start: * a bad airlock; * cracked coil on cylinder two; and * an O2 sensor that was reporting incorrect readings (as reported by the Durametric package). The car solved number one itself with a massive burp of coolant after a particularly hard drive, giving me a scare in the process (initially thought the cylinder liner had gone - engine cut out, the engine compartment was soaked and a big cloud of water vapo
    1 point
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