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Showing content with the highest reputation since 03/01/2020 in all areas

  1. The factory default for the valves is the loud position, so if they are not hooked up, that is what you get. The valves only move to the "quiet" position when activated. The original reason for the valves was the incredibly restrictive Swiss noise laws for residential neighborhoods, so when the vehicle was operating a low speeds, it was quiet.
    2 points
  2. Sometimes when there is a voltage spike to the system (like connecting a new battery) the programming can get "mixed up". When this happens the best thing to do is have a tech/shop with a PIWIS re-program the affected control module(s). I think it very rare to replace a DME if most everything but one or two items are not working.
    2 points
  3. All of the larger cables are susceptible to this problem. The longer the cable, like to the starter, the worse the problem because their length exacerbates the resistance issue, leading to larger voltage drops. The only real trick to checking each one with either a multimeter or Power Probe unit (Power Probes actually have a specific setting for checking voltage drops, plus the Power Probe's long leads back to the battery make the testing process easier).
    2 points
  4. Porsche "Book Time" to replace both front wheel bearings is 4.7 hours times your shops hourly rate. Porsche "Book Times" are usually a high estimate - an experienced tech can usually do the job in much less. So let the shop quote time - as long as it is under the "Book Time" you are likely good.
    2 points
  5. Looks like the part that goes inside the oil filter canister - to hold the filter in place. Just clean it and then push it back in.
    2 points
  6. Updated parts list (your's is 15 years old). 997.1 rear strut.pdf
    2 points
  7. First of all, LN Engineering's IMS Solution is a LOT more than just an oil feed line; the bearing insert is a solid bearing (no moving parts) with annular oil passages just like the almighty Mezger turbo engines used, the IMS shaft is plugged to prevent oil accumulation and the balance problems associated by running the shaft full of oil, the replacement rear IMS flange is coated with a Diamond like coating for strength and longevity, and the oil feed is sourced at the oil filter to get clean, cool oil rather than where some others have sourced it. Perhaps one of the biggest advantages of the
    2 points
  8. I would first check the one you have to make sure it is not blocked from air flow by debris.
    2 points
  9. Welcome to RennTech , and your English is fine, and much better than our Greek! It probably caused by oil pressure bleeding down from the hydraulic tensioner's in the VarioCam system, which do not cost that much, either in Euros or $.
    2 points
  10. Be aware the most dealer will not share the service records for the vehicle because they legally belong to the previous owner(s), and the dealers are uninclined to track them down and get a legal release.
    2 points
  11. I agree with millerchris85. After all the work and money poured into my CTT it’s eh now and I’d have been better served tuning up my 996TT. If you really must have a sporty drive in a Cayenne then I suggest looking after a 958 GTS, Turbo or Turbo S and having someone tuned them to your liking. Be forewarned though you will wear through ancillaries (brakes, axles, tensioners, etc...) much faster depending on how much and how hard you drive
    2 points
  12. A cooler on the return line from the rack to the pump will probably help.
    2 points
  13. Charge pressure sender Manifold pressure sender
    2 points
  14. A couple of days ago my head unit started cycling off and on every minute or so. I found some posts that these things are notorious for failing so I started looking for a place that would repair it. Luckily I found the Becker office in Saddle Brook NJ, called them, and they emailed me instructions how to fix it. Apparently my XM SAT provider caused the problem. It required a reboot as per below: WARNING It was brought to our attention, that the PCM 3.0 and 3.1 units have been rebooting continuously on a number of Porsche vehicles at the moment. It seems that a signal was s
    2 points
  15. OK, first of all, either twisting wires together and wrapping them with tape, or using wire nuts is totally unacceptable for automotive applications. Both are pathways to shorts and even fires. Wires should be reconnected with crimp connectors at a minimum, with soldering them and then using heat shrink tubing to cover the soldered joints the actual preferred method. Most likely, in the process of doing this swap, you disturbed something, but exactly what is hard to say, particularly as the previous owner used the twisted wire and tape wrap method of connecting things. It is ent
    2 points
  16. Sorry for the delay, but the Virus has made things upside down everywhere around New York. Hope it's not too bad in Cleveland.:) I think I found some initial pics that can help you get started in solving the problem with your top... Here is a series of photos on my '97 Boxster when it still had the original "A Version", all metal housing transmissions. I think that if you put your clamshell manually to this exact position, and then duplicate the position of the V-levers and other parts, you will have an excellent starting point. Forgot to me
    2 points
  17. Hi guys, I bought my 1999 Porsche 911 C4 Tiptronic back in January and I've been doing little projects on it ever since. I used to have a 2016 Dodge Challenger R/T Scat Pack with a 6.4 liter V8 that I traded in last summer, but I was missing the sports car feeling too much so decided to buy the Porsche. One of the things that stood out to me on the test drive was just how sluggish and unresponsive the Tiptronic gearbox felt compared to the one I had in the Dodge. Since the rest of the car was in very good condition (invoices for every oil change & repair going back to 2003, IMS
    2 points
  18. You should not have to - unless you hooked up the new battery backwards. If the polarity was hooked up correctly then you need to start looking for poor grounds. Starting with the battery cable then chassis grounds.
    2 points
  19. Your stated voltage measurment is weak. You should be testing the primary cables, the large ones running from the battery to the ground and starter, these are the ones that tend to develop internal corrosion. If you are unfamiliar with this test, do a search as this has been covered several times previously. We always load test both the alternator and battery when there is a problem. While this requires a load tester, it verifies that both are capable of delivering both the correct voltage and current (amps) as required.
    2 points
  20. DIY tutorial to remove center console and replace stock shifter with a Numeric shifter. I completed this modification on my 2010 C4S. Center Console Removal and Shifter Replacement.pdf
    2 points
  21. Eureka! I suppose during the time you guys were typing, I was arriving at the same conclusion. I pulled the latch mechanism out and examined it up-close. The tension spring was out of a pocket on the latch and not providing any push when the latch was released. Hence, the hood could be pulled up out of 'battery' but would not pop up on its own. I disassembled the mechanism, lubed it, and re-inserted the spring into the latch. Put it back together and now all is well. Very simple to do. This is how I did it and you may find it useful. Do so at your own risk, yada yada yada. 1st, open
    2 points
  22. This was crazy, apparently two different things happened. Fortunately, nothing major. First, the battery ended up having a dead cell. Replaced it and good as new. I was hearing that with the 2021 polar vortex seems that a lot of people had the car batteries go bad, not sure how wide spread though. Second, the sound was coming from passenger seat. The adjustment switch on the passenger front was stuck, but not enough to actually move the seat but just enough for the motor to be engaged...lol Still need to figure out the burning smell! Still take that in consi
    1 point
  23. The Valvetronic System, when closed, will sound very similar to stock. When the valves are open it will dramatically increase the tone of your Boxster. Our valved systems utilize Helical Vales, Same as what's used in the OEM Porsche, Ferrari, Lamborghini systems. In terms of sound and performance, you cannot do any better than that system! Fabspeed will even transfer the Lifetime Warranty to your name!
    1 point
  24. Just received a breakout box with some leads to complete my set of 996 vintage tool 😉 I've been using a PST2 since 2008 with a lot of success. Especially for friends that are looking to buy a use 996 turbo or simple troubleshooting and keys reprogramming.... But I never used a breakout box before and it is difficult to found information about how to use this tool especially on Porsche. Would like to test the internal voltmeter/ohmeter (URI) of the Bosch KTS500....OBDII pinout, 16 ports on the breakout box ? 6 leads, + ground (black) red and blue wires etc....Is there, somewhere, printed info t
    1 point
  25. You need to have a diagnostic scan run with a Porsche specific tester like PIWIS or Durametric. It will report back fault codes - get those and post them here.
    1 point
  26. At 90,000 miles Porsche recommend to replace the front differential oil. But the all wheel drive on 996 turbo got no controller as such. It is a viscous coupling. Viscous clutch on the parts catalog item#6. This viscous coupling is sealed and no maintenance is required....
    1 point
  27. Auto's en lichte commerciële voertuigen AFTERMARKET.ZF.COM Personenauto's This is the catalog of the transmission manufacturer, country and language can be changed if necessary.
    1 point
  28. If the sensors are going to be changed out, a good penetrating oil should not be an issue. If they are going to be reused, I would heat the sensor bung with a torch before pulling on the wrench. In either case, a very small amount of anti seize on the threads of the sensor before installation is a wise move to avoid future maintenance issues.
    1 point
  29. Welcome to RennTech Common problem, usually the sending unit going goofy. Easy DIY.
    1 point
  30. I believe that you will find that list is for the IMS Solution only, there is a sperate list for their ceramic hybrid retrofits.
    1 point
  31. Normally, if the light cannot be soldered or otherwise repaired, it is time for a new light.
    1 point
  32. 2003 Cayenne S So my wife's pepper had a fishbowl in the passenger rear taillight for awhile now. I guess long enough that it shorted something out as the running lights no longer have power. I have 12V going to every pin in the connector except the common orange wire for the dual bulbs in the bottom of the tail light. Brake lights, turn signal, back up light work just fine. The fuse on the passenger side panel is in proper working order. I believe there is a controller box for the taillight somewhere in the rear cargo area (not the tow controller, the actual taillight controller). I am
    1 point
  33. 968 Sent from my SM-G955U1 using Tapatalk
    1 point
  34. What you should be doing is running a voltage drop across the primary cables; anything more than 0.5 V means the cables need to be replaced.
    1 point
  35. Porsche stopped publishing their service manuals around 2004 and switched to an online subscription service for those without a PIWIS unit (it is included with the PIWIS), so there are no reliable sources for legitimate PDF files. Part numbers you can get online from sources like board sponsors Sunset Porsche’s parts website. The Durametric system is hands down the best aftermarket diagnostic tool for Porsche.
    1 point
  36. View this tutorial 955/957 rear seat latch replacement I believe it's a fairly common issue, but granted that I've only been around these Cayennes for a short while. Failure modes: 1-Unable to release latch to tilt seat-back forward, failure to unlatch. 2-Seat latch fails to secure seat-back in the upright position, failure to latch For me, I was running into failure mode #2. When pushing the seat-back up it would not latch no matter how hard I tried. I sourced a new-used replacement from ebay. The parts be
    1 point
  37. It connects to a vacuum line that goes to the switching solenoid.
    1 point
  38. Ok guys, now that this seems sorted out. In my case the problem was a faulty air change-over valve. Since I was at it I also changed the electric change-over valve. I thought I'd post an entire post-mortem on the whole incident. This way future reader can get all the info in one spot. In short, no horror stories but a lot learnt. A Huge thanks to Loren, 1999Porsche911 and tholyoak for helping me thru this. Guys, I'm going to be quoting you in the writeup below, hope you guys don't mind. If people want to read the original message and the whole thread, its below. Background =========
    1 point
  39. I have the complete factory instructions in pdf format for this from PIWIS. PM me & I'll send them. I retrofitted the entire system no worries from these instructions including factory wiring/switch/dealer coding. The wiring (not the switch replacement) & getting to the boxster engine/installing the vacuum lines is the hardest part. Exhaust bolt in is simple. I wanted the whole factory deal.
    1 point
  40. This has been covered before, but it can be done using a 4" diameter plastic pipe coupler (has a ridge half way down the inside that the old flywheel bolt heads can rest on, then tighten slowly in a crosswise pattern to pull it in evenly.) The trick to getting the new design PTFE seal to work where the older design did not is being absolutely scrupulously clean, not even finger prints on any parts, and no sealant of any kind. You also have to install it at an unusual depth, 13MM from the flywheel mating surface of the crank, not 14MM.
    1 point
  41. I've attached 2 plumbing schematics for the air suspension system. The first is for the Touareg, the second for the Cayenne. I'm assuming the aftermarket compressor you have may be like the one for the Touareg which did not have the tyre filling feature. If that is the case then you can see the tyre filling plumbing is not available on that compressor, and is also fitted with some extra check valves which could be causing your issue. The tyre filling connection is shown as number 8 on the Cayenne diagram, and is missing from the Touareg version.
    1 point
  42. I second the comments that Maurice has been a great help. I was able to diagnose my problem to a broken tip on one of the cables that caused the red ball joint to break thus warning me there was a serious problem before I completely ruined the clamshell. As it is, I think I may be able to repair it and at worst case I have found a replacement at a salvage yard. I may still need some help on where to position the V levers since I had to take those off to release the torque. Thanks Gary
    1 point
  43. Hello all just thought I would close out this thread by reporting the resolution to my problem. Turns out there were multiple underlying causes to the symptoms I reported at the start: * a bad airlock; * cracked coil on cylinder two; and * an O2 sensor that was reporting incorrect readings (as reported by the Durametric package). The car solved number one itself with a massive burp of coolant after a particularly hard drive, giving me a scare in the process (initially thought the cylinder liner had gone - engine cut out, the engine compartment was soaked and a big cloud of water vapo
    1 point
  44. Here are the pictures and instructions. This TSB is easy to do, and the range in my key remote went from 4 ft to 30 ft. 1999 996 Cabrio. Here are the tools you will need. The following steps: 1. Remove the sun visor. It simply pulls out 2. Use the small flat screw driver to pry of plastic cover on visor base. When removed, you will see the Hex bolt heads 3. Use the 4 mm Hex wrench key to remove both bolts. Hold on to the part, it has washers on the other side and can get fall off if not careful. 4. Now pull off the A-pillar cover to reveal the cables underneath. 5 Pull out th
    1 point
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