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Showing content with the highest reputation since 10/25/2020 in all areas

  1. Some after photos... Definitely took more time cleaning than building this motor....
    3 points
  2. The headlights look fine to me.... people obsessing over headlights and BS like that are what makes the 996TT still one of the best cars out there, pound-for-pound, dollar-for-dollar
    3 points
  3. You can get a set of small "ez out" hex bits, one of which should fit tightly into the bolt head while rotating counter clockwise, which will loosen the stripped fastener. Amazon and others sell them (Amazon screw/bolt extractor set)
    3 points
  4. I created a video on how to remove and disassemble the front door. This includes removing the bottom trim strip, door lock, door handle, inner door panel, window/frame and door shell.
    2 points
  5. The factory default for the valves is the loud position, so if they are not hooked up, that is what you get. The valves only move to the "quiet" position when activated. The original reason for the valves was the incredibly restrictive Swiss noise laws for residential neighborhoods, so when the vehicle was operating a low speeds, it was quiet.
    2 points
  6. If you are even considering that, that's because you don't really like the car and should sell it. To me. For cheap.
    2 points
  7. Sometimes when there is a voltage spike to the system (like connecting a new battery) the programming can get "mixed up". When this happens the best thing to do is have a tech/shop with a PIWIS re-program the affected control module(s). I think it very rare to replace a DME if most everything but one or two items are not working.
    2 points
  8. As someone that spent a significant part of his career in the battery business, your use of "assuming the proportions are the same" is more than seriously flawed. The CCA test used by the BCI (Battery Council International, the international technical consortium that sets standards for battery ratings and testing procedures used by battery manufacturers world wide) is very similar to the one used by the SAE (Society of Automotive Engineers); which requires storing the finished and fully charged battery a 0F (-17.8 C) for a period of 24 hours, then load testing it to determine its CCA rating. There is no known "proportioning" formula for determining this value, only hard testing data. Lightweight battery manufacturers have been "inventing" unique rating values and "equivalencies" without a basis in technical facts, and that are really totally meaningless, simply because they know what the outcome of publishing the more widely accepted testing data would be: Their batteries would appear weak compared to conventional SLI (starting, lighting, ignition) batteries.
    2 points
  9. Eureka! I suppose during the time you guys were typing, I was arriving at the same conclusion. I pulled the latch mechanism out and examined it up-close. The tension spring was out of a pocket on the latch and not providing any push when the latch was released. Hence, the hood could be pulled up out of 'battery' but would not pop up on its own. I disassembled the mechanism, lubed it, and re-inserted the spring into the latch. Put it back together and now all is well. Very simple to do. This is how I did it and you may find it useful. Do so at your own risk, yada yada yada. 1st, open the hood and peel back the carpet cover just inside of the latch. Next, using a flat-head screwdriver, remove the four plastic 'screws' holding the trim plate between the bumper and the hood flange. They merely turn 90 degrees (so that they are perpendicular to the car's direction of travel) and pop out. Then remove the trim piece and place to the side. Next, using a ten millimeter socket, remove the two bolts securing the latch to the car. They are located just inside the trunk under the carpet you just peeled back. Once they are removed, the latch is now only held in place by two metal cables and the alarm pin switch wires. Carefully unplug the alarm wires. Push in on a small 'latch' on the lower half of the plug and pull out the lower half. Then carefully rotate the upper half about 45 degrees (it should be fairly easy to move, don't force it) and the plug will pop out of the metal holder. Then use a small screwdriver to gently push a release clip on the plastic mounting point. This will allow the small plastic mount to separate from the wiring plug. Now you need to gently remove the cables from their sockets. Take the tension off of the upper cable and gently pull the cable up out of its socket. Then remove the lower cable in the same way. The only thing holding the latch in the car now is the alarm wiring harness. Push the rubber grommet through the body toward the bumper. You can then pull the wiring through and the entire latch will come out of the car. Be sure to set the stainless steel shroud to the side. It was not attached on my car but may be on yours. Now that you have the latch out of the car, you can see the large diameter steel spring that is wound around the large post to the passenger side of the latch. That is the culprit. The small plastic shroud over it pulled straight out and off of my latch. This is the microswitch that tells the alarm that the trunk is open or closed. Set it to the side. You should now see the latch mechanism and the hole that the spring needs to be in to function properly. I used two screwdrivers to push the other end of the spring (the end on the release / catch mechanism ) over the catch. This allowed me to push the end into the latch more easily. I then popped the spring back over the catch. Now there should be tension on both the latch and the catch. Lubricate with white lithium grease, or some other semi-solid lubricant and work the mechanism to ensure that it is functioning properly. Once you have confirmed proper function, reassemble in reverse order (i.e. put the alarm switch back on - it should snap right back in place ), pop the cable back on, thread the wiring through and secure the grommet in place, place the stainless shroud on, insert the bolts and loosely tighten things. Once the bolts are in, line up the hood and the latch mechanism and tighten down the latch. Replace the plastic bumper/body trim piece but don't insert the 'screws' until you've tested the hood a couple times. Once it is clear that the hood is functioning properly, secure the trim, replace the carpet and smile at a job well done, for free. If I can figure out how to transfer my pictures out of my camera phone I'll add some illustration to this. Hope this helps. I was frustrated as *)*^*( until y'all help me realize what the problem was. Pictures ...
    2 points
  10. Ok here is the deal with removing these things..... 1. First you must remove Both AC Vents, and the Upper Center Console... The strips are held in from screws behind the dash, but reaching them is a waist of time! 2. The 2 small strips will pop out with some force, just take a flat head screwdriver and tap it in behind the strip. The screws will pop out from the back of the dash... The dash is a hard plastic material and the screw heads are small so they will come right through the dash.. 3. The long piece across the passanger side was fun... Tape the dash will several pieces of tape to protect the dash in case you slip. These pieces have 2 layers to them.. take a flat head screwdriver and open the top part of the stip.. It will look like this once you peel off the top layer..you can see the top of the scew holes after you peel off the top layer Now my stereo installer had the next idea.. he took a small soldering gun like this... and heated up the head of the screw that is seen from the top side.. this made the area around the screw soft, and then I took the screwdriver behind the remaining strip and pried it right off.. it broke off to every screw head.. we just did this right along and 10 minutes later it was all out.. Be sure to not get the solder gun to close the the leather.. just keep it on for about 30 seconds.. it really is helpful if one guy holds the solder gun while the other removes the strip. The top piece is the stripped piece.. the bottom is the whole piece that was pulled out from the middle. Installing the new pieces was simple, a little silicone behind them helped the stay in place but its not needed..
    2 points
  11. Note: Part numbers sometimes change without notice. Always double check with your supplier that you have the latest part numbers. (Special thanks to Chuck Jones for being the guinea pig and for taking the photos.) Parts you will need: 997.624.113.00 Actuator Tools you will need: Very short Torx T20 driver and right angle ratchet or tool to use the short T20 in a very confined space Regular screwdriver, phillips screw driver, and 10 mm wrench to remove th wheel well liner 1. Jack the car so that right front wheel is off the ground and secure it with a jack stand. Remove the right front wheel. 2. Remove the wheel well liner by removing the the plastics rivets (pry them out with a regular screwdriver). As well remove the 10 mm nuts on each side of the axle. Now remove the phillips screws that fasten the wheel well liner under the front bumper and remove the wheel well liner (and set aside). 3. Locate the EVAP canister and remove the electrical connection at the top of the canister. Now remove the 10 mm nut that holds the canister in place. Remove gas the vapor lines - one at the top and one at the bottom (again by squeezing the connectors). Remove the EVAP canister by pulling gently back and forth until it releases from the rubber gromments 4. Look back up under the fender (now that the canister is out of the way) and locate the broken actuator. Now using the stubby Torx T-20 loose (but do not remove) the two T-20 screws. The actuator itself is a bit tough to get to and you will need a really short T-20 Torx head to loosen the two screws. I say loosen because that is all you need to do to remove the part - it sits in two "U" shaped slots. Remove the electrical connector (by squeezing the tab). Here is a pic of the new part - as you see the Torx screws are already in place so that is all you have to do to replace it. 5. Put the new part in place making sure you feed the emergency pull line through the fender to its location in the door jam. There is room to slide it through the side so you don't need to try and thread it through the hole. Fasten the two Torx screws and reconnect the electrical connector. Chuck's car had the guide rose guide piece missing (so he needed to order one) Here is a pic of his car (without guide rose) and my car (with guide rose). Ref. P/N 997.624.505.00 We also noticed that on his car the plastic catch for the lock was missing (so he needed to order that too). Here is a pic of his car (without cap) and my car (with cap). Ref. P/N 996.201.243.00 6. Reinstall the EVAP canister by pushing it into place on the rubber gromments. Then reattach the vapor lines (they should snap back into place) and the electrical connection. Finally put the 10 mm nut back in place and tighten down. 7. Reinstall the wheel well liner (reverse of removal). 8. Mount the tire, lower the car and re-torque the wheel bolts. Done.
    2 points
  12. The radio antenna is located in the A pillar on the right side in driving direction, what you found in the left A pillar is the remote control antenna.
    1 point
  13. +1 Sunset Porsche is an excellent site p.s. I see you're in Brooklyn. I used to live in Clinton Hill.
    1 point
  14. Shops tend to function like the distillation process; very few cars come in to tell us everything is fine, and the owners have absolutely no problems 😉 Roseann Rosannadanna was correct, "...'if it's not one thing, it's another"...it's always somethin'."
    1 point
  15. Hi all, Hoping to provide some clarity on replacing the crankshaft position sensor on a 986 WITH Tiptronic transmission as I have not seen (or was unable to find) any good/clear pictures of the process to find the sensor. As I found out, it is hiding well behind the plug/receptacle for the Oxygen sensor on the right side of the vehicle. I read all kinds of guides pointing me to the correct general location, but they all pretty much said it was obvious and I knew exactly what I was looking for. I spent well over an hour searching because I could not see it, and found out that on a Tiptronic, you have no direct line of sight to the sensor unless you move the oxygen sensor plug/receptacle. Hopefully these pictures will help anyone else trying to replace the CPS no a tip. In order to see the CPS you must unplug the oxygen sensor, remove the receptacle mounting bolt and push both cables and mount/receptacle out of your way. The view shown here is from underneath the car looking up towards the wheel well and CV joint. A wider view of the area you need to look into remove the oxygen sensor, receptacle, and bracket. You can follow the cable from the oxygen sensor to the bracket in order to find it more easily. This is your entry point and trajectory. Just beside the right rear brake caliper, under the brake fluid line, past the coolant reservoir drain hose. The extension is probably all of 18 inches to get you deep into where you need to be to unscrew the bolt holding the CPS in place. I used the light you see plus a large work light on the floor to finally visualize the sensor. The only way I was finally able to find the sensor was to identify the cable from the sensor and follow it by hand and light. That is when I realized I could not see it due to the oxygen sensor plug being in the way. This is just a wider shot of the entry using the light as a reference and the brake caliper is in the foreground. Here is a view of the CPS still in place, but the bolt has been removed. The oxygen sensor plug and receptacle have also been removed and pushed out of the way. Once you see the CPS, it is obvious that is what you've been looking for. What I think are coolant hoses are very close to the trajectory you need to access the bolt. My extensions were pushed up right next to these hoses and I had to push on them with the tool in order to get access to the bolt. Just a couple of other tips and tricks. The bolt of the CPS is held on by thread locker. Make sure you have good engagement with your male hex into the screw head during removal, otherwise it could strip. I recommend ordering a new screw for the CPS while you're at it, the newer ones are torx and less likely to strip. Once you locate the CPS you will find that you can actually reach in there with your fingers through a path in order to push it out of and into the hole. When you go to put in your new CPS, place it in first without the bolt. You can wiggle it into the hole reasonably easy with your fingers through the aforementioned path. When you go to place the bolt, either use a magnetic tool or tape the bolt to your male hex so that it doesn't fall off. Yours truly lost the original bolt and still have yet to find it. Luckily it is a pretty standard M6x16 available at your local hardware store. But I have no clue where that bolt ended up. I searched by every means possible including a powerful magnet around the area of loss and still could not find it. Hope this helps save you the hour or so of searching in your 986 Tiptronic for the CPS. Remove that O2 sensor harness first and you'll save a bunch of time and frustration!
    1 point
  16. Could be a sign that the DME has a RoW tune in it rather than the North American code.
    1 point
  17. If you have a qualified repair shop there is no reason not to buy the Bell Housing. Porsche, like many other manufacturers, sell only complete units.
    1 point
  18. I think you just identified it, those motors are designed to be momentary, not constantly run 😒
    1 point
  19. The code is pretty specific, it is seeing a difference between where the MAF is and where the throttle body is located; the leak has to be in between those two elements, but does not preclude that there may be other leaks that have not thrown codes.
    1 point
  20. First of all, these transmissions are very sensitive to the lubricant used; over the years, we have had numerous cars come into the shop with everything from noise complaints to poor shifting issues (particularly in the cold), and for the most part everyone was cured by thoroughly draining the lube out of the gearbox and then refilling with the factory fluid. Most people do not realize that Porsche factory lube, which is a full synthetic, is produced to Porsche specs, and does not conform to aftermarket product specs. At one time, we inquired of several major lube companies if they had an exact match product, and were uniformly told that, “No, Porsche uses a unique specification lubricant, and the brand market is too small for us to produce a similar product.” That said, even the factory fill cannot correct existing wear issues, or mechanical issues. Second gear pop out is a well known problem which can often be corrected by installing an updated detent part like the Gbox fix.
    1 point
  21. That car is utterly gorgeous, congratulations! I owned one in the same colour for two years in London. Get the bolts that connect all of the exhaust system checked for rust. It's very expensive to fix later on and always happens. I would change them all every 3 or 4 years, consider better non OEM ones if you're not worried about maintaining the Porsche warranty. Also replacing the seals between the front and back side windows made mine feel like a new car as the glass didn't wobble. A cheap but satisfying fix. Made the car feel like new again. Enjoy! Sent from my SM-N976B using Tapatalk
    1 point
  22. Update! So I decided to start by check the driver's side, and boy am I glad I did (since the pressured line on the passenger side is such a mess to remove)-- it seems that when getting the filter seated last night, I somehow managed to have one of the electrical connectors going to the filter (the black and red cables) came unplugged!! 🙄🙄 She's alive!! 🙂
    1 point
  23. Did you use the procedure in the Lost Radio Code FAQ to get the correct serial number (in the display)? If not, please do so and re-submit the correct serial number.
    1 point
  24. Most likely the control boxes have returned to factory settings after the work which has been carried out. Run the "Vehicle handover" program using a PIWIS tool and you should be fine.
    1 point
  25. The correct test for the primary cables is voltage drop rather than resistance. No primary cable should show a drop of 0.5 V, if they do, they should be replaced regardless of what resistance testing shows.
    1 point
  26. It turns out, the actual sensor itself isn't bad, one of the bushings of the ball and socket connector is completely gone.
    1 point
  27. I am a "professional" that has run his own shop for many years, and my lawyer was advising me as a business owner, based upon multiple legal actions brought against similar businesses, and it two cases, individuals who did it for former buddies that later sued them for damages, and won big $. The potential consequences simply are not worth the risk. And no one here is offering legal advice, only our experience.........
    1 point
  28. I added a switch to the top of my relay so if I ever wanted it to go back to normal. I've never touched the switch. Sent from my GM1917 using Tapatalk
    1 point
  29. Should be a case of unbolting and then disconnecting the wire harness connectors.
    1 point
  30. Porsche has updated that bulb carrier assembly and the updated part would depend on your original part number (for each side). They are about $60 US each.
    1 point
  31. Normally, if the light cannot be soldered or otherwise repaired, it is time for a new light.
    1 point
  32. Start with the fuse -- D3 should 30A. Remove it and test the fuse with an ohm meter. D3 is in the fuse box by the drivers left leg. D3 is 4th row down and 3rd fuse from the left.
    1 point
  33. I was able to retrofit a spare wheel with jack and took kit from an older Boxster (986) into my 2007 Cayman (987.1). Clears front lid without touching. Takes up some of the space but I prefer spare and regular tires as opposed to run flat tires.
    1 point
  34. I was lucky enough to get a hold of 2 944's for $300. 1985 turbo which is my project. And a 1987 which is my parts car. Sent from my SM-N920T using Tapatalk
    1 point
  35. I bought these off eBay about a month or two ago. I was impressed by the quality, fit, and price. FOR PORSCHE 911 996 SPEEDO GAUGE RINGS SURROUNDS SET OF 5 Brushed Matt Aluminium ROVER.EBAY.COM PORSCHE 911 996 SERIES (1998-2005) only - all models with the dashboard like shown on the photos only. Box contains: 5x ALUMINIUM DIAL GAUGE RINGS / SURROUNDS Sample Fitting Instructions. Material finish: Brushed Aluminium. Good luck!
    1 point
  36. My experience: dido@didotuning.pl e-mail and www.didotuning.pl for the website. They take Paypal and write decent English. My order, shipped, was 185 zloty’s or $50. Got a set from them a year ago. Takes 20 minutes to put them on and they look great.
    1 point
  37. Also, i think you must be very carefull about alignment of the subframe back into the original position. Before removal, make some marks on the existing position.
    1 point
  38. All ignition system component's age with use, and as compression ratios go up, and obviously even more so in turbo or supercharged engines where the cylinder peak pressures escalate even more quickly, the more quickly the ignition components become unable to "light the fire", sometimes on just an intermittent level. So what you are seeing is not at all unusual or unexpected, and it is also why full race engines resort to multi spark and really high voltage ignition systems. The penance you have to pay for higher HP output on the street is more frequent maintenance and often higher quality ignition components.
    1 point
  39. Sorry, my mistake - your car is a 987. Yes it is on the drivers side but access is through the front trunk. You will need to remove the luggage compartment lining to get to the upper plug. and remover the two torx head screws. Then remove the inner wheel well lining and disconnect the canister fittings there (underneath the canister as you lift).
    1 point
  40. Sunset Imports is NOT a Rennlist sponsor -- they ARE a RennTech.org sponsor ;)
    1 point
  41. 1. Pull engine cover vertically upwards and off. 2. Separate the six ignition coils from the wiring harness. Refer to the following note for more information. It is very difficult to access the ignition module plugs to unlock them. Therefore, use a suitable tool (e.g. a bent piece of wire) for unlocking. Press the plugs against the ignition module to facilitate unlocking. Otherwise, the plug locks may break. 3. Press plugs down slightly, unlock with a suitable tool (e.g. bent piece of wire) and remove. 4. Pull out ignition coil and lay it aside. 5. Remove the spark plugs. 6. Check electrode gap. The electrode gap for the spark plug must be 1.1 mm. 7. Tighten spark plugs using special tool (spark plug wrench 3122B ). New spark plugs are tightened to 20 Nm (15.0 ftlb.) when first tightened. 8. Install the plug coils. When doing so, make sure that the straight surface is pointing to the intake pipes. 9. Reconnect the ignition coil. The connectors must engage audibly. 10. Clip on engine cover and check that it is seated correctly.
    1 point
  42. I would add the following to help others attempting this ... please read the above and the below completely BEFORE starting your work. You'll thank yourself ! Getting the tank out I'd remove the air pump instead of tying it to the side as above. Its very simply and takes 30-40 seconds. It gives you room you REALLY need. Plus you won't break the air hose by bending it too much. NOTE: There are two screws that hold the air pump in place - at the bottom. In my case I found out that the nut thse screws go into had fallen off during removal. The nuts are 'suspended' in a rubber tube and age/temperature had made the rubber brittle and the nut had just fallen when I took the screw out. I simply got new speed nuts (2x : part number: 999.500.078.00 : $2) and used them to fit the air pump back again. Its worth taking the air pump off even if you now need to buy $2 more of nuts when ordering your tank - it gives you a lot of room you need ! To remove the coolant reservoir easily out of its harness, slide it towards the engine (i.e. move right) by around 1/2 to 1 inch. Then move it DOWN and out of its rail/holder. There is no need to slide it COMPLETELY (3-4") towards the engine completely as it first appears. The railings have tabs and gaps to facilitate such removal/installation. You probably won't even have that much room to slide it out completely ! When draining the coolant from below the car, you'll need a bucket to keep most of the coolant and may need to empty the tray below into the bucket. Use 2 trays so you can empty one when the other is below the car. The coolant drains fast, so you can't use just one without making a mess. Also, there is a lot of coolant, almost a bucketfull. Coolant is a corrosive liquid - keep it off the paint. If you drop some on the paint, don't panic, just wipe it off with water and a cloth. Use gloves if possible. The drain plug for the coolant is close to the rear bumper, don't search too deep inside near the transmission etc ! There is a coolant level sensor at the bottom of the coolant tank. Its deep and tough to see and you may break it manupulating the tank of get it out of the engine compartment. I'd recommend you reach down and remove it as follows. - when reachable, turn the sensor by 1/4 turn from towards you to towards the engine. - pull the sensor out from the bottom (it needs 2" to fall out, its 2.5" tall). - keep it somewhere ! If you do break it (likely), its around 10-18 bucks, so don't panic ! Lastly, be patient in getting the tank out. Its not difficult but simply time consuming. Be careful not to bend/break other hoses while you try getting the coolant tank out. Putting the new tank back in place When installing the new tank, I found it easy to first install the sensor at the bottom and then twist-lock it (1/4 turn). The electrical connection should point towards the right taillight. First try to get the entire tank in the volume reserved for it in the engine compartment. Don't try to directly fit it in. Make sure you don't leave any tubes/connectors behind the tank during installation. The last think after installation is to realise you need to get it out to rescue a forgotten tube. Now you want to get the tank back in its harness. The harness' as well as the tank's railings have gaps to ease removal/installation. What worked good for me was rotate the tank anti-clockwise by 10-20 degrees when inside the cavity/volume of engine compartment position the right most tab of the tank sticking out of the harness while keeping the other two tabs (on the tank's top) positioned to fall in the gaps between the harness' tabs. Try feeling the gaps with your finger to know where the tank's tabs should land. Slide a 1.5" diameter metal tube at the bottom (running front -> back) slightly to the left (or right?) so that the level sensor wouldn't be obstructed upon rotation. It should gently slide out of its holder. Now level the tank (i.e. rotate it clockwise by 10-20 degrees). The tank's tabs should have fallen where the harness' gaps are and the tank will be one tab sticking out (out = towards the engine) Finally move the tank gently away from the engine, in its final installed position [*] Slide the metal pipe back into its clamp [*] Connect everything else just the reverse as removal. After everything is installed Once you have the new tank in place, you will need to refill it with coolant and 'bleed' the coolant system. Fill the coolant tank with existing/new (porsche recommended) coolant to the max level and close the coolant tank lid. I simply filtered my existing coolant with a old (but clean) cotton t-shirt and poured it in using a funnel. Then, to quote Loren, "Lift the bleed valve." "Start the engine and allow it to get to full operating temperature (I also ran the air conditioning to force circulation). The coolant warning light will likely start to flash. Shut the engine off and WAIT until the engine and coolant has cooled enough to remove the coolant tank cap. Then add coolant to the tank and repeat the process. You made need to do this 2-3 times. When the coolant level fails to fall then the system is bled and you can close the bleeder valve." About bleeding the coolant system. Close the bleeder value after about 40 minutes (total) of good driving. You shouldn't ride with it open for more than this (my Porsche tech told me this). You MUST wait for the coolant to cool between your 2-3 tries, else you won't be filling the tank completely (coolant contracts as it cools). I've had to wait for over 3 hours to cool. If you try before this then the coolant will spill off when you open the cap. You may get a coolant light even with the bleeder valve closed after a few days. This is ok and doesn't mean you cracked your tank or something again. Basically there was some air trapped and the car "burped" it into the coolant reservoir, triggering off the coolant light. Wait for 4 hours for the car to cool and then top off with coolant+water (replacing a lot) or just water (replacing just a little). If even after 3-4 top offs/"burps" you need to keep adding coolant, have it checked for other leaks in the coolant system. In the end, once you've done it, please pat yourself on the back !! Great job :thumbup: !! Even my service tech. at the local dealership said its not a simple job. Its worth doing it on your own if you suspect you're losing coolant. :cheers: Sid
    1 point
  43. The Tiptronic transmission has a special tool for fluid. First you have to purchase the tool (expensive) or make one (inexpensive). The tool is the V.A.G.1924, runs about $300. You need the following tools and parts to start: 1. ATF fill tool 2. 7 (US) Quarts of Pennzoil Multi-Vehicle ATF 3. Torque wrench for 60 ft lbs 4. Torque wrench for 7.5 ft lbs (90 in lbs) 5. 17 mm allen bit 6. 8 mm allen bit 7. Torx 27 bit 8. Temperature meter with probe. I used an Oregon Scientific with a probe that has a 10 ft cord. 9. Porsche part 986 397 016 00 Paper gasket (Call Sunset Porsche, great guys) 10. Porsche part 986 307 403 00 ATF filter 11. Porsche part 986 397 016 00 rubber ring for fill plug 12. Kitty liter, you will spill 13. Socket set 14. Plenty of rags 15. Oil catch pan 16. Safety goggles First we assemble the filling tool out of parts you can find in Lowes or Home Depot type of homestores: 1. Hudson 1 gallon tank ($9.95) 2. Barbed fittings and 8 ft of tygon 3/8 clear hose. 3. 1/4 inch shut off valve - brass 4. 12 inch of flexible copper tube, 1/4" 5. Assemble as shown below and bend the tube per the picture. The steps are easy to follow: 1. Lift car off the ground and on jack stands. I need 16 inches on the stands to be comfortable. 2. Slide oil catch pan under fluid pan and remove drain plug with 8 mm allen bit 3. Remove the cross arm that traverses the fluid pan. Loosen only one bolt, remove the other. It will be easier for the next step and you can prop the arm to help catch the pan when the bolts are removed. 4. When the fluid has drained, secure drain plug back in and torque to 30 ft lbs. 5. Using the Torx 27 bit, remove all the screws crosswise. Move the cross arm out of the way as needed, but put back in a place where the pan will not fall. THE PAN STILL HAS FLUID in it, be careful 6. Remove pan carefully. The green gasket should still be attached to it. 7. Remove the two screws that hold the filter in place. Make sure the oil catch pan is underneath, the filter will have fluid as well. Remove filter. 8. Thinly coat some petroleum jelly on the suction collar of the ATF filter and install filter 9. Install new filter and screw the two screws to a torque of 4.5 ft lbs. 10. Empty the filter pan into the oil catch pan with all the waste oil. Place the filter pan on a flat surface and remove the gasket. 11. Set the plastic guard cap so the two windows are facing sideways. The holes will be used later for the fill tube and for the temperature probe. Notice how large they are. 12. Use the rags to clean the pan and the magnets in the pan. Set the magnets back to their original location. Here is a nice clean pan and magnets. 13. Place the new gasket on the pan. I used petroleum jelly thin coat on a few places to hold it in place. 14. Fit ATF pan back into transmission, tighten the screws crosswise to 7.5 ft lbs. It may be convenient to use the cross arm as a resting place while you re-attach the pan. 15. Remove the fill plug with the 17 mm allen key. Replace the ring gasket with the new one. 16. Fill the pressure tank with ATF fluid, make sure the valve is closed. Pump the tank to provide the pressure to move the fluid. The clear hose will show the red fluid filling it, and also you will see it running later. 17. Insert the "hook" end of the copper tube into the fill hole, and hook it into one of the holes mentioned before. Insert the temperature probe into the other hole, make sure it is secured. 18. Open the valve and let the ATF fluid begin to flow. You will have to add more fluid to the tank and keep it pumped. When the fluid begins to escape through the hole. It will drip, so close the valve. 19. Start the car. Open the valve to let more fluid into the ATF pan. Keep it pumped. Look at the temperature display on your probe. The temperature should not exceed 45 C. It begins at room temperature, so you got a few minutes. 20. Move the selector to position "P" and let idle for a a few seconds. When the fluid begins to emerge again from the filler tube, close the filling valve. 21. The engine should still be idling, keep an eye on the temp probe. With the brake pedal on, change the transmission through each position, holding the position for 10 seconds. 22. Open fill valve again until ATF fluid escapes from the hole. Make sure the temperature is higher than 30 C, and should be around 40C by now. Remove temperature probe and filler tube. 23. Replace the filler plug and torque to 59 ft lbs. 24. Turn engine off, and take car out for a test. :drive: 25. You are done, check for leaks, clean the spills (cat litter), and enjoy some smooth shifting.
    1 point
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