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Showing content with the highest reputation since 07/04/2019 in all areas

  1. 3 points
    First off - thanks to everyone who has been down this road before me for providing tips and suggestions and troubleshooting regarding this common problem. I have been dealing with a key that would stay all the way to the right upon starting meaning that the A/C, heated seats and some other items would not function. My solution had been to simply start the car and then just move the key back one notch to the left and everything worked fine. So if others have that issue, my original solution will work but obviously the problem remains and at some point you may end up stranded if the ignition switch completely fails. I stumbled upon some of the other threads and found that this needed fixing and I opted to replace just the switch as opposed to upgrading to the new complete unit that Porsche has moved to. This procedure is not new to the board, but I thought a step by step with pictures may be useful to those looking for an inexpensive solution. It cost me $12.11 including tax. If your ignition mechanism has been changed to the newer revised unit the ignition switch is a different part number but I assume the steps would be the same. The part for just the switch - no longer available through Porsche since they are only selling the entire $150 unit - is 4A0905849B. The switch alone is available mail order through Pelican for $10, Autohausaz.com was +/- $8.75, Ebay has them all over the map from $15-30. All of these options will work but require shipping charges and delivery time. I was hoping for a local option since I had the time to do it today. Here is what I found in Houston - a local Audi dealer had one in stock for $35, while VW had to order it (for more than $35 believe it or not). Doing a search online at parts stores using my Porsche got me nowhere so I opted to use an older Audi - in my case a 1997 Audi A8 since the part is the same. I found Autozone had one for >$40, OReilly came up blank but I did not call to check, a specialty imports place had one for $27 and then I found it in stock at NAPA for $11.19 + tax. Since NAPA seems to have stores all over the place I suggest looking there first if you don't feel like mail order. The complete part number at NAPA was ATM 4A0905849B using the 1997 Audi A8 as the vehicle. Here is a picture of the NAPA part (left) alongside the original part which I removed from my 996 cab - note the AUDI rings on the old part. Equipment needed: Small flat screwdriver - eyeglass or electronics size Philips screwdriver Torx driver 10mm wrench rubber pry tool Cold beer to celebrate 1) Disconnect the battery - I just undid the negative with a 10mm wrench 2) OPTIONAL but makes the job easier than the shop manual in my opinion. Remove the side air vent by pulling the headlight switch towards you and inserting a small blade screwdriver up from the six o'clock position. You should notice a spring like resistance which will release the knob and allow it to pull towards you. Here is a picture of the back of the knob showing the release mechanism Once the knob is off remove the three torx screws – one in the headlight control recess and two on the side After the screws are out take a rubber pry tool (or be careful with a flat screwdriver) and remove the vent housing - it will pull towards you with a little effort but not much. Once off I pulled it out far enough to gain access but left the headlight control connected because I was lazy and saw no need to unhook it. I forgot to take a picture of this part but it should be self explanatory. You will now see a philips screw directly in the back of the air vent - remove. 3) Crawl under the dash and remove the center piece (A) of the air vent - there is not much room and you will not miss it. The piece can be nudged towards the side to release on one end and then the other. Since you removed the screw from above you should be able to remove the middle and side piece now out the bottom. 4) Unplug switch by pulling directly off the back - do not unhook the purple tabs just pull the entire unit back. Make sure to pull this off BEFORE unscrewing and removing the switch as the screws holding the switch in make this much easier than trying to get a hand in there - believe me I jumped ahead and then resorted to screwing it back in. 5) Unscrew two set screws - one on the bottom on one on the opposite side. The screws are coated with red paint that may need to be chipped through with your screwdriver before you can get the screw to grab. I unscrewed the bottom screw while under the dash and then from the seat I reached under and could view the top screw through the side vent area and unscrewed it. Do not remove the screws just undo them far enough to remove the ignition switch. Bottom screw noted in this picture Top screw as viewed from side vent opening - this can also be done from underneath but the small space and clutch pedal against my head led me to look for easier access 6) Now that the screws are loose you should be able to pull the ignition switch out and replace it with the new one. Screw in the set screws, hook the harness back to it and get ready for a cold beer - not quite but almost 7) Slide out from under the foot well, hook up the battery and see if all is well. You may as well check before reattaching the rest. If the car starts as it should you will notice a nice smooth ignition with the slight spring back to the left just after ignition. Hook up the air vents, screw everything back together and push the headlight knob back in place 😎 Crack open a cold beer and smile - you just saved a lot of money. This is one of the simplest "repair" DIY out there - it took me probably less than 20 minutes including removing the side vent and I took my time since I had never done it before. If I need to replace it again - which is likely - it will be even quicker. You can always replace the entire ignition module with the new and improved unit at around $150 I think - and alot more effort - but for $12 and 20 minutes I am hoping I can get some decent life out of this switch and then just replace it again in a few years if I need to. Like I said before - this is not a new DIY but I am hopeful that these pictures will be helpful. Thanks again to all of those who provided the prior posts.
  2. 2 points
    A couple of days ago my head unit started cycling off and on every minute or so. I found some posts that these things are notorious for failing so I started looking for a place that would repair it. Luckily I found the Becker office in Saddle Brook NJ, called them, and they emailed me instructions how to fix it. Apparently my XM SAT provider caused the problem. It required a reboot as per below: WARNING It was brought to our attention, that the PCM 3.0 and 3.1 units have been rebooting continuously on a number of Porsche vehicles at the moment. It seems that a signal was sent by SiriusXM which has caused this issue. SiriusXM and Porsche are investigating currently and are working on a fix. VERY Important: Please DO NOT replace any parts or hardware on a vehicle, due to this issue. In order to rectify this issue, you will perform a “PCM handover” (also known as a PCM Hard Reset). Instructions are listed below; Press and hold the PCM>>Info button for approximately 10 seconds until the PCM reboots. Immediately select the following from the PCM; CAR>>OPTION>>Set PCM System>>Reset PCM>>Vehicle Handover>>Yes>>Yes These instructions can also be found in the respective Owner’s Manuals for affected vehicles. Hopefully this may prevent Dealership / workshop visits. If your vehicle is already at the workshop, recommend that the technician update it to the latest available software level. **PLEASE NOTE: Performing a PCM Hard Reset will also erase all of the radio presets and Bluetooth connections and these will have to be reentered by you after the reset.** In order to rectify this issue, you will perform a “PCM handover” (also known as a PCM Hard Reset). Instructions are listed below; Press and hold the PCM>>Info button for approximately 10 seconds until the PCM reboots. Immediately select the following from the PCM; CAR>>OPTION>>Set PCM System>>Reset PCM>>Vehicle Handover>>Yes>>Yes WARNING Reboot for PCM 3.1.docx WARNING Reboot for PCM 3.1.pdf
  3. 2 points
    OK, first of all, either twisting wires together and wrapping them with tape, or using wire nuts is totally unacceptable for automotive applications. Both are pathways to shorts and even fires. Wires should be reconnected with crimp connectors at a minimum, with soldering them and then using heat shrink tubing to cover the soldered joints the actual preferred method. Most likely, in the process of doing this swap, you disturbed something, but exactly what is hard to say, particularly as the previous owner used the twisted wire and tape wrap method of connecting things. It is entirely possible that you may have pulled another such "MacGyver" like repair loose that is not related to the radio swap. Probably the best approach at this juncture is to get the vehicle scanned with a Porsche specific scan tool to see what the various communication modules are doing. Good luck with this one.
  4. 2 points
    Hi guys, I bought my 1999 Porsche 911 C4 Tiptronic back in January and I've been doing little projects on it ever since. I used to have a 2016 Dodge Challenger R/T Scat Pack with a 6.4 liter V8 that I traded in last summer, but I was missing the sports car feeling too much so decided to buy the Porsche. One of the things that stood out to me on the test drive was just how sluggish and unresponsive the Tiptronic gearbox felt compared to the one I had in the Dodge. Since the rest of the car was in very good condition (invoices for every oil change & repair going back to 2003, IMS bearing changed, etc.) I decided to buy it anyway, assuming I would get used to having to mash my foot into the carpet everytime I wanted the thing to move. Looking through this forum and others, I heard about the Sprint Booster and how it might help with this problem. For those of you that don't know what this is, it is a small plug that sits between the gas pedal and the cable harness running to the ECU and that changes the signal sent to the car from the position of the gas pedal. The factory set up makes it so that when you push the gas pedal, the revs rise very slowly for the first 50% of pedal travel. I think I read somewhere that halfway down, the pedal will only give you about 25% of the power. This means that in order to get the Tiptronic box to do a downward shift, you really REALLY have to mash the pedal and do it in a quick manner. In general it makes the whole car feel unresponsive and not at all like the free-revving, happy sports car I thought I was getting. The Sprint Booster module (which only works on cars with electronic throttle control or "e-gas" pedal) will take the gas pedal input and modulate it to reflect a more aggressive pedal action. The only thing that changes really is the voltage that is sent to the car's ECU, and how this is calculated in relationship to the position of the gas pedal. The unit comes with a little control gadget where you can set it to one of three basic settings - Factory (simple pass-through, nothing changes from stock), Sport (about a 30% more aggressive response), and Race (about 50% more aggressive). Within both Sport and Race you can then fine tune with an additional setting from 1-9 for each of the two categories. By default the device will put you in "5" or the middle ground. The device costs you about $300 and there is no discount to be had from any of your typical market places. I simply bought mine directly at the manufacturer's website. Since it was my birthday last week, I decided to treat myself and see if it might work. You have a 30-day money back guarantee and the install process is completely reversible, so I figured I'd give it a go. If it actually helps make my tiptronic feel peppy it will have been worth every penny. If not, I'll just return it. For the installation my first problem was figuring out if my particular car had an e-gas or electronic throttle system or not. Looking at the gas pedal I can see a cable running up the bulkhead so I wasn't feeling too optimistic. With the help of others on this forum, I learned that all 996's have e-gas except the 98-99 C2. I also popped the hood and looked at the throttle body itself. To be extra sure, I also asked the vendor to confirm that my particular model would work with the product. The manufacturer's website only shows MY 2000 and beyond as approved for installation, but they came back and confirmed that in fact the -99 C4 does have e-gas and so I could proceed with the purchase. 3-4 days later I get the box in the mail. It is a tiny little thing and doesn't appear to be much for the $300 I paid for it, but whatever. The installation manual shows pictures of the device being plugged into a port located somewhere on the gas pedal assembly itself. It is clearly the most common spot for most manufacturers to link the throttle to the ECU, but that's not the case in a Porsche 996. The gas pedal pulls on a cable and if you follow the cable up from the pedal, you'll see it attaching to a metal box conveniently located under the actual dashboard, and at an impossible angle for any human being to get to. In these cases I like to resort to child labor, so I bribed my 13-year old son to help me. By laying upside down in the driver's seat and sticking his head + one arm under the dashboard, he was able to get the device plugged in correctly in as little as 2 hours. I was basically reduced to cheer leader, and voice of reason to guide his efforts. We made use of my cell phone camera to try and figure out from the pictures how to disconnect the old plug and get the new Sprint Booster in place. The pictures attached to this post will show you how we figured it out: The entire installation process is done by touch and feel as you cannot see any of the components directly. I would recommend our approach of using a camera, talking about what we need to do next, and then use your fingers & imagination to figure out what it is that you are doing. We found it helpful to start with where the cable attaches to the box, then run your fingers over until you hit the little metal flange that sticks out with the white plastic butt underneath it. When you have your hand there you know that the plug itself is just above it. After the initial installation we immediately took the vehicle out for a ride. The gas pedal felt weird, and we had intermittent revving and a noticeable delay when pressing the pedal. I figured it was simply down to the device having to calibrate itself so we went for a ride. 20 minutes in we get a check engine light come on so we headed back to the garage. Ever the optimist, I simply disconnected the battery to reset the CEL and then went out for another drive. This second time it worked beautifully! The car felt like a different animal all together, and the gas response was crisp and immediate. Problem solved, or so I thought, and we called it a day. The second day I went for a drive and got not only a CEL but also the PSM and ABS warning lights. At this time I was ready to call it a day and send the device back since I don't want to have to deal with buggy electronics or stuff that I can't trust. Called up the son again to have him pull everything out and that's when he noticed that the OEM male connector at the end came lose by simply touching it. Turns out we hadn't been able to plug it in all the way until it latched onto the Sprint Booster module. I guess it is not manufactured to the same tight spec as the OEM stuff, and by a fraction of a millimeter the plug can't go in far enough to secure it with the latches. Using force and patience, we eventually managed to push it all the way in until we heard the very satisfying "click" of the plug latching onto the module. If I have to take it off again because it comes loose, I will certainly use a file to remove a bit of material on each latch and ensure that they lock into place without having to push too hard. Since this point I have driven the car 4-5 times and about 50 miles, driving it as I usually do and without holding back in any way. No CEL or other warning lights and the thing runs really well. Having tried the different settings, I have decided to leave it in Sport-5 which I think is a happy medium for a sporty feel without compromising the ability to drive smoothly when you want to. Race mode makes it more binary, and it is like mashing the pedal at every stop light. It might be fun on a track, but for everyday driving it is just too aggressive. In Sport-5 it'll pull away softly in 2nd gear like it did with the factory settings, but if you simply give the pedal a little shove it'll immediately downshift to 1st gear and take off with gusto. All in all I have to say that this was very much worth it. The car feels different - more sporty and responsive, just like you'd want a Porsche to feel like. I know this doesn't add any power to the engine but just by having the Tiptronic gearbox work more like a modern sports car it really changes everything. I'm now planning on driving it for the full 30-day money back period, and if I run into any issue I will post an update to this forum. Cheers, Magnus Update - April 22nd, 2020: I've now driven with the Sprint Booster for 6 weeks and I can honestly say that this was the best bang for the buck modification that I've done to my Porsche. I would rate my Alpine head unit & speaker system upgrade as the mod that I most appreciate, but that was $2,400 and this was only $300. Just be careful with the installation and count on it being a PITA...
  5. 2 points
    Welcome to RennTech On cabriolets, the number 2 relay panel is mounted to the rear of the roll over protection frame. You need to put the top in the "service" position to gain access to it.
  6. 2 points
    This DIY tutorial covers how to remove the intake manifold on the 3.6L V6 Cayenne. Removing the intake manifold gives you access to several parts of the engine that you may need to service. Disclaimer: Perform at your own risk. This is for reference only, I am not responsible for any damage/injuries that may occur from this procedure. Please do not attempt if you are not comfortable with doing work on your car or working around the fuel system. Work in a well ventilated area as you will be releasing a small amount of gas and fumes. Difficulty: 5/10 Estimated Time: ~2 hours If you’re getting a Durametric error code P0674, you likely have a bad PCV valve that needs to be replaced. An easy way to test a bad PCV valve is to unscrew the oil fill cap on the engine while it is idling. If you feel suction on the cap and/or the idle fluctuates once the cap is removed then your PCV valve is bad. The PCV valve is built into the valve cover so your options are to buy a whole new valve cover assembly (95510513500- ~$347) or buy just the PCV membrane (aftermarket $20-25) and replace it in your existing valve cover. To get access to the valve cover, you will need to follow this DIY article to remove the intake manifold first. Other reasons to remove the intake manifold are to service your fuel injectors or to make it much easier to replace the thermostat. The thermostat can be changed without removing the intake manifold (I did it twice), however you basically need to be a contortionist to reach the bolts to remove housing and you will scrape some knuckles along the way. Tools Needed: -Flathead screwdriver -Assortment of torx bits (T20, T25, T30, 6” long T30) -Pliers -Torque Wrench -3/8” ratchet set with various extensions and a universal joint -1 1/16” Deep socket -10mm Triple Square Spline Bit -Crescent Wrench -9/16” Open End Wrench -Dental pick Parts Needed: -Brake Booster Vacuum Hose- 95535557941 (your existing hose is probably brittle and will likely crack from removing it, I recommend getting a new one) -Lower Fuel Injector Seal Kit (3X) - 95511091000 (existing seals may be brittle and once you have removed the intake manifold, they may not seal properly upon reinstallation, I recommend getting new ones, need 3 sets) Procedure: First start by removing the plastic covers surrounding the engine. Using a flathead screwdriver, remove the quarter turn plastic trim fasteners. Rotate them in either direction by 90 degrees and pop them out. Be ready to catch them as sometimes they like to jump out. Next you will need to remove the 2 torx screws on either side of the engine cover with a T25 bit and the screw under the windshield washer reservoir cap with a T20 bit. Remove the oil fill cap and front engine cover by pulling straight up. They are held on by friction rings around a stud so pulling straight up will release it. Now that you have the covers removed, it’s time to remove the intake filter box and intake piping. Using your T25 torx bit, rotate the 2 screws until the dot on the screwhead lines up with the lower indication on the filter cover. Now gently use your pliers to pull them straight out. With your flathead screwdriver, pop up the two clips to release the filter housing. Pivot the filter house towards the passenger side of the car and remove it. Remove the engine air filter as well. Next, remove the wiring harness from the MAF sensor located in the middle of the intake piping. Loosen the clamp around the intake piping on the throttle body and gently work the intake piping back and forth until it releases from the throttle body. Remove the top bolt on the engine lift bracket and loosen the lower bolt with your M10 triple square bit. Then pivot the bracket towards the front of the car. Remove the bolt next to the throttle body with your M10 triple square bit. Then unplug the wire harness from the throttle body. Remove the top bolt from the bracket on the passenger side of the engine with your M10 triple square bit. Remove the vacuum lines from the intake manifold on the passenger side of the engine. One hose requires pliers to open the hose clamp, the other can be removed by hand if you squeeze the lock ring around the hose to release it. Next, from the passenger side, reach your hand around to the back side of the engine. There is a vacuum line that goes from the bottom surface of the intake manifold to the brake booster. You will need to pull the vacuum line fitting straight down to pop it out of the intake manifold. I don't have a good picture of it so here is a diagram of it. Pull down on the elbow fitting, not the hose. Also on the back side of the engine just behind the vacuum line you removed there is a bolt that needs to be removed using your M10 triple square bit. You are working blindly so locate the bolt first by feel and guide your bit to the bolt. Remove the 3 screws holding the actuator with a T25 torx bit. Slowly pull it straight out towards the front of the car. There is an actuator arm that attaches to a shaft on the passenger side of the part. Once you have enough clearance to reach your finger in there, you need to slide the arm off the shaft as you pull the entire actuator off. Then disconnect the vacuum hose from the actuator. Now pull the coolant hoses out of their holder in the intake manifold and push it towards the driver side of the car. There is a T25 torx screw that attaches this water hose bracket near the back of the intake manifold. The screw is facing up, so you need to use your T25 torx bit and get creative with removing that screw. I used a crescent wrench to turn the torx bit while holding the torx bit in place with my other hand. With the water hose bracket free, slide the water hose bracket towards the front of the car to release it from the intake manifold. This bracket has a keyhole slot that will release once it's slid forward. Remove the oil dipstick tube bracket with a T25 torx bit. Just push it out of the way once you remove the screw. With your long T30 torx bit, remove the bolt on the intake manifold that was under the actuator. Next, there are 3 blind holes on the driver side of the intake manifold. You need to use your long T30 torx bit to loosen the screws inside those holes. Those 3 screws are captive screws so they will not come out. There are 3 bolts below the intake runners. They need to be removed with your M10 triple square bit. This is where your universal joint will come in handy. The bolt near the rear of the engine required me to use my u-joint with various entensions to acess. At this point, you will hear gas leaking out. Since you have released the pressure from the lower fuel rail to the lower fuel injectors, the pressurized gas in the rail will leak out. Make sure you are working in a well ventilated area. From the driver side of the car, reach behind the engine to remove the wire harness from the fuel pressure sensor. Using your 1 1/16” deep socket, unscrew and remove the fuel pressure sensor. Using your 9/16” open wrench, unscrew the nut that connects the metal fuel line running from the lower fuel rail. The slimmer your wrench the better. My crescent wrench did not fit here. Now that the intake manifold is completely unbolted, you can start to wiggle it free. You will need to lift the manifold up from the passenger side and pivot it up towards the driver side. You will need to wiggle the lower fuel rail loose to release the metal fuel line you just unscrewed the nut from. It is a flare fitting that pushes into the upper fuel rail assembly. Be gentle here as you don’t want to bend the fuel rail. Once the metal fuel line is free from the upper assembly, you can remove the intake manifold as described above by lifting up from the passenger side first to pivot it off. At this point, you have access to the fuel injectors if you need to service them, the thermostat housing and the valve cover. Unbolting the valve cover is straight forward from here if you need to replace the PCV valve, etc. The fuel injector seal kit comes with a rubber o-ring, Teflon o-ring, Teflon sleeve and metal clip. At the bare minimum you should replace the rubber o-ring and Teflon o-ring. Use a dental pick to remove the old o-rings. These 2 parts are the wear surface when you remove/reinstall the intake manifold and are prone to fail if you re-use them. Trust me, I learned the hard way. To install the intake manifold, reverse the steps above. Take care in sliding the lower fuel rail back onto the lower fuel injectors and lining up the metal fuel line back into the flare fitting. I found it was easier to pull the lower fuel line out of the manifold to line the flare fitting up first, then pushing it into place in the intake manifold. You want to apply even pressure on the surface as you tighten all 7 of the bolts down on the driver side. Torque the 3 triple square bolts evenly to 6 ft lbs, torque angle 90 degrees, then a final torque of 22 ft lbs. The bolts holding the engine lift bracket are 17 ft lbs, the other triple square bolts holding the manifold on the head are 15 ft lbs. Once you get it all back together, turn the key to the ON then START position without your foot on the brake. This will run the fuel pumps to build pressure back up in the fuel rail. I removed the key and repeated 2-3 times to get the fuel pressure up. The first time you restart, it may take a couple seconds to fire up due to the fuel pressure needing to build back up. If you replaced your PCV valve, it may idle rough as the ECU needs to remap since it adapted to a leaking PCV valve over time. If you did not replace the fuel injector seals and smell gas/hear it leaking after shutting off the engine, then your seals failed and you need to repeat the procedure and replace those seals.
  7. 2 points
    Are you sure you don't have fuses mixed up? I'm currently on 1 pump in my CS with fuse 14 pulled and can hear the right side pump running/whinning when the car is on. I think Fuse #14 is for the driver side pump and #13 is the right pass side pump, but feel free to correct me If I'm wrong USA
  8. 2 points
    Ok guys, you've been waiting for this, and as promised, here is my brief, but descriptive walkthrough. this is what you will need as the following: Porsche Panel wedge tool Screw Driver w/ T-20 bit and Flat head bit Turbo Instrument Cluster strong fingers! Ok with that cleared away, here is the first step. Remove the black plastic gauge cover above the gauges. Use the wedge tool or , in this case I used my fingers! (don't use the fingers, i highly recomend not to , it hurts hahahah). Remember , you will need to apply gentle but enough pressure to detach the tabs off from the top cover of the dash that is over the cluster As you can see, the reason why i say "gentle" is because you have the tabs, take them off or apply too much pressure, and those bad boys can break, if anyone had experience with plastic and heat, they can easily become brittle. Just make sure you use precaution. Next, there are 5 screws to detach the dash cluster cover. 4 screws are attached to the top of the gauge cluster, while one (in back) inside the housing is there to hold the cover in place on the main dash. Remember, these are t-20 screws. two are parallel on each side , symmetrical to each other The rear screw, is located in the center back of the gauge cluster cover. as illustrated here. Once all screws are removed, just like the black pastic gauge cover, remove the upper gauge cover off gentley. They are tabbed in place, so apply the righ pressure. Note: when you remove the cover, be sure you have the washer for the 5th screw. This holds and aligns the cover of the cluster in place. as shown here Once the top is off, you will need to gain access to the bottom half. this is where most of the work will be done. here are the major things you will need to do - Remove trip pieces - unscrew support holding ignition/key - remove driver left AC vent Lets begin with taking off the side cover where the fuse housing is and the AC vent. Use the wedge tool to open the side panel and to take the ac unit out. the AC unit pops out as an entire pice, though the trim may seperate, this is normal, but becareful , damaging the trim will result in a loose fit. The reason for this to come out is there is a screw that holds the lower portion in place, which later will be necessary to access the bottom part of the instrument cluster Next take off the trim. There are three screws, t-20's , that are behing them. use the wedge tool again, gentley take the trim off. Again use precaution when taking them out. the outer ignition/key cover is part of the trim. so make extra effort to be careful Once the trim is removed, and the screws , make sure you remove the support ring , which holds the ignition key in place by way of screwing around the threads of the ignition. there is a special tool for this, but i used a flat head screwdriver to pussh along some tabs gentley till it was unscrewed. Repeat for the trim on the right near the windshield wiper control arm on the steering will. there should be two screws to take off. Also note, the screw inside the AC vent on the left driver side, it should be on the upper corner. Next, once all screws have been removed, gentley remove the tabs off , again, use precaustion, these are tabs, and need to be taken off with extreme care avoiding damage to them, and causing not to fit properly Once the bottom is removed, go ahead and take out the remaining two bottom screws that hold/support of the cluster. Again,these are t-20 screws Once remove, it's self explanetory from there, there are a green and blue connector, with purple latches. unlatch both, and remove the old cluster. Put in the turbo cluster, and presto, turn your car on, and test the cluster b4 putting it back together. your cluster should then boot up and you will see what awaits! Further notes - When you hook up your gauge cluster, you will hear a weird buzzing noise, that's ok, it's just the cluster responding to its connection. You will also notice that your milage should be at 0.0 for new clusters or whoever's previous milage was on it, if you bought it used. So be forwarned, My friend who knows vw/audi's said clusters like these have a tendancy to carry over their last cars info on milage over to whichever car they are being installed. So note to yourself, to write down your actual mileage. Once done, and pre programed, go ahead and put everything back together, and yours should look like this Alright now! I hope everyone is successful as I was, and hope all you skeptics out there can take it easy and rest knowing someone already done this for you! hahahah Enjoy! if you have any other questions or comments, just PM or reply! I'll be more than happy to help! I will also be posting a turbo bumper upgrade too for those who are interested later once i get my spare headlight washer parts in! til then good reading folks :D :P
  9. 2 points
    Note: Part numbers sometimes change without notice. Always double check with your supplier that you have the latest part numbers. (Edit - July 25, 2006 - Updated the clutch bleeding procedure to the latest procedure as outlined in supplement 98 of the Carrera Service Manual - Loren) Parts you will need: 1 liter (minimum) 000 043 203 66 Porsche DOT 4 Brake Fluid or equal (ATE Gold or ATE Super Blue) Tools you will need: Jack 19 mm socket for wheel bolts Motive Power Bleeder (or equal) image Needle Nose Pliers 11 mm wrench for brakes; 9 mm for clutch slave (sizes vary from car to car but they are usually 9 mm or 11 mm) Plastic tubing and waste container (at least 1 liter) Jack up the vehicle at the lift points provided and remove the rear wheel (you will need to do this for each wheel). Remove the cap on the master cylinder reservoir. Remove the plastic screen using a pair of needle nose pliers. This can be a little bit challenging but it will pop off (be careful with the brake fluid.. it eats paint!) Use a syringe (or turkey baster... just don't reuse it) and suck out as much of the old fluid as possible. Fill the master cylinder reservoir with new fluid. Put the rest in the power bleeder. Screw the cap that came with the power bleeder onto the master cylinder reservoir. Put the pressure cap with the pump handle on the power bleeder and pump it up to just under 20 psi - do not go over 20 psi! Bleed order - Right rear, Left rear, Right front, Left front. Place your drain tube over the outside bleed nipple and in the bottle (remember it will need to hold a liter when you are done). Bleed the outer bleeder valve first. Open each bleeder valve until clear, bubble free brake fluid emerges. Take care to bleed at each brake caliper and at both bleeder valves. Carefully tighten the bleed screw. Wipe off the area and replace the rubber protective cap over the bleed screw. Repeat steps 8-10 for the interior bleed screw. Then reinstall the wheel and move on to the next wheel. Note: It makes sense to check the pressure and amount of fluid in the tank between wheels. Running out of fluid means starting over and getting air out. Optional Clutch Bleeding This is best done when you are bleeding the left (driver's side) rear wheel as the clutch bleed valve is mounted high above the axle on the transmission. Push the clutch pedal in by hand (very slowly) and use a long piece of wood to hold the pedal down. I wedged the other end (of the wood) between the seat and door frame -- with plenty of soft padding to avoid scratches. A second option is to have a 2nd person sit in the car and keep the clutch pedal FULLY depressed. Open the clutch bleeder valve until clear, bubble free brake fluid emerges (at least 30 seconds according to Porsche). Remove the wood. Then, pump the pedal again very slowly by hand for a further 60 seconds. After pressing the pedal down fully about 10 to 15 times, leave the pedal in its normal position. After allowing a fill time of 90 seconds, check that no more air bubbles appear at the bleeder valve (use a collecting bottle with a transparent hose). Then close the bleeder valve. Wipe off the area and replace the rubber protective cap over the bleed screw. You may notice that the clutch pedal does not return... so carefully pull it up (slowly) to it's normal position. Then depress it (slowly) a few (at least 5) times. In a few cycles the feel should return. [*]Torque the wheels bolts to 96 ftlb. (130 Nm). [*]Do a final check on the brake fluid level and top up if needed.
  10. 1 point
    I'm not sure. I've heard it's best to stick with a Porsche branded pump (rather than even the OEM Pierburg).
  11. 1 point
    PET shows that up to 06-11-2016 the LEDs weren't handed, as PET shows one part number for both sides (7PP 919 238) which is now superceded to 7PP 919 238B. £6.06 GBP incl. VAT. I suspect the Touran part I listed is the same, as it just has a different number prefix.
  12. 1 point
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  14. 1 point
  15. 1 point
    Likely a bad pump or leaking lines.
  16. 1 point
    This is great. I was just looking at mine today and thinking that I should design one up and print. You already did the hard work. Thanks
  17. 1 point
  18. 1 point
  19. 1 point
    Your correct, MB23 is an important Ground for all those systems.
  20. 1 point
    Clear Marker Lenses - Full proceedure with pictures All - Thought I would contribute to the board with an easy starter project that has been detailed before in text but no real picture instructions. Unfortunately, i could not upload the larger resolution images do to board constraints. NOTE - lens were ordered from bumperplugs.com > good communication and fast shipping. (Sorry for spelling errors ) Enjoy! Author roxboxxx Category Cayenne (9PA, 9PA1) - Accessories Submitted 10/08/2008 06:11 PM  
  21. 1 point
  22. 1 point
    Interesting, that product is a direct rip off of the LN IMS Solution, which is patented to Jake Raby. Stand by for this to be shut down in a lawsuit...…..
  23. 1 point
  24. 1 point
    When the car came up to temp the DME relay would over heat and fail and the fuel pump would stop running . Installed new DME relay and it runs like a top now.
  25. 1 point
    P1666 Overrun Recirculating Air Valve - Signal Implausible Possible cause of fault - Overrun recirculating air valve stuck in closed position at times (due to ice) - Overrun recirculating air valve faulty
  26. 1 point
  27. 1 point
    996 Ignition Switch replace (just the switch) with pictures First off - thanks to everyone who has been down this road before me for providing tips and suggestions and troubleshooting regarding this common problem. I have been dealing with a key that would stay all the way to the right upon starting meaning that the A/C, heated seats and some other items would not function. My solution had been to simply start the car and then just move the key back one notch to the left and everything worked fine. So if others have that issue, my original solution Author scb71 Category Carrera (996) - Common Fixes and Repairs Submitted 09/16/2009 01:31 PM Updated 03/13/2017 05:24 AM  
  28. 1 point
    In order to see the outside air temp, the car has to have the on board computer option.
  29. 1 point
    You had a hydraulic not mechanical clutch. Does the ticking speed increase if you touch the accelerator lightly? Is it there at any time while driving? Johan
  30. 1 point
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  36. 1 point
    Your part number is correct except for the M14 at the end, which tells me it is a Pelican number. Don't buy it from them, they a known for swapping out non OEM for the real thing. Get it from board sponsor Sunset Porsche.
  37. 1 point
    I now have it in for diagnosis at a reputable Porsche shop.
  38. 1 point
  39. 1 point
    Item 16 is 3 nuts per side that the muffler (mounting bracket on the muffler) to the mounting bracket on the car. Item 19 is 2 bolts per side that hold the mounting bracket to the chassis. When I remove the mufflers I just remove the 3 (per side) nuts 16. I have never seen any damage on these.
  40. 1 point
    Porsche has gone rather stiff necked about adding options post delivery. If memory serves, you have to have the clock, and pay Porsche to recode the car as having both. Most dealers seem to charge the exact amount you would have laid out to have it as a factory option. Not a pretty situation, but then you are dealing with Porsche...…...
  41. 1 point
    To my knowledge, Porsche did not use that measurement as spec on these engines. Instead, they had specs for overall valve length from tip to tip as 110.1 +/- 0.1MM on the intakes and 109+/- 0.1MM on the exhausts, and installed valve spring heights on valves that passed the overall spec at 36.7 +/- 0.3MM intakes and 35.7 +/- 0.3MM exhausts as measured from the spring seat to the bottom of the spring retainer.
  42. 1 point
    You can drain some oil by simply dropping the oil filter and draining the canister. A lot better than trying to control the flow from the drain plug. And yes ^^^ these cars are very sensitive to over fill. Maybe contact the "Porsche shop" that overfilled your oil and ask them to do it.
  43. 1 point
    Have your friend look into Michelin Super Sports (I have these on my 991S) or the newer PS4s. Both great tires, and some are becoming "N" rated, though that's not exactly required.
  44. 1 point
    For any student of Porsche Variocam diagnoses ,this was an interesting contribution to the Forum wisdom on the subject.Thanks for the time taken to document all this for us. Fortunately the O.P. was adept at both the electrical and mechanical tasks required for both diagnosis and repair. A superficial diagnosis would have indicated a defective solenoid from the Durametric Actual Values ,the 13 ohm Resistance test,the click test with a 9v battery Fortunately the P.O. also identified the fundamental cause of the problem to be a defective solder joint in the DME. He concluded that was causing an over-current to one solenoid. If he had simply replaced a defective (very expensive)solenoid , his repair success would not have lasted long. And how many times would the repair cycle have been repeated before the root cause was identified ? Opening the DME as part of Variocam Solenoid diagnosis seems like a good idea ! Carefully pry of the cover from the disconnected DME and smell it+ look for small burn areas.For those who do not have the skills to repair solder joints on the DME board, the only repair resource I have seen on the Forums is Specialized ECU Repair. They charge almost $700 for a replacement ECU .So those soldering skills were very valuable to the O.P. ! Unfortunately the Solenoid windings were beyond repair. Thanks Talkenrain and may your Variocam System be eternally perfect.
  45. 1 point
    Removing and installing drive belt - Cayenne Turbo Removal 1. Remove the front engine compartment cover. 2. Pull the cover of the throttle body vertically upwards. 3. Pull off the electrical plugs on the throttle adjuster 1 and unclip the cable. Then pull off the plug on the boost pressure sensor 2. Twist the two fastening bolts 3 through approx. ca. 45° in an counter-clockwise direction and pull out the bolts. 4. Loosen the hose clamps to the left and right on the bellows and pull off the bellows. 5. Pull off the Y pipe from the throttle body and pull off the hose on the Y pipe. To do this, press the button and pull off the hose. 6. Unclip lines underneath the Y pipe and remove the middle section. 7.Undo intake manifold on the air cleaner cover. To do this, turn the two fastening bolts through 180° and pull the bolts out in an upward direction. Then pull out the intake manifolds. 8. Remove the air line on the right air cleaner cover. To do this, unclip the green cap. Insert a screwdriver into the notch of the cap and lever the cap off. 9. Push the snap ring into the flange 1 and then pull it off together with the flange 2. 10. Clip the green cap on again after disassembly. 11. The coolant bleeder hose on the coolant expansion tank should be unclipped from the air cleaner housing cover of the cylinder bank 1 − 4. 12. Remove the air cleaner covers. To do so, loosen each of the two fastening clips on the top side and remove the cover from the engine compartment in an upward direction.<br> 13. Loosen the two fastening screws of the pressure pipes on the lock support. Note: Depending on the routing, the electrical cable belonging to the fans may have to be disconnected on the left side and laid to one side in order to access the fastening screws of the Y pipe. 14. Disconnect the electrical plug of the electric fan. 15. To do so, loosen the hose clamp on the bottom of the left hot film mass air flow meter and remove the component from the engine compartment. 16. To do this, loosen the two hexagon socket head bolts (a/f 5) of the pressure pipes. 17. Remove the two pressure pipes from the vehicle. 18. Disconnect the positive crankcase ventilation line 1 and the control lead 2 of the bypass valves on the disconnection point under the left deflection roller. 19. Mark the direction of movement of the drive belt with chalk. 20. Relieve and remove drive belt. To do this, use an open−ended wrench (a/f 30) to turn the belt tensioner clockwise and remove the drive belt from the tensioning roller. Relieve the belt tensioner slowly. 21. Remove the drive belt from all pulleys. Installation Note: The following diagram illustrates the complete belt threading course. The pulleys are numbered according to the sequence of fitting. 1. Make the belt into a loop and place over the crankshaft belt pulley behind the dipstick. 2. Place the top part of the belt loop over the coolant pump pulley 1. 3. Place the lower part of the belt loop around the crankshaft belt pulley at the bottom 2. 4. Guide the belt section from the coolant pump around the deflector wheel 3 on cylinder bank 5 − 8. 5. Then guide the section of the belt around the air conditioning compressor belt pulley 4 at the bottom. 6. Then lay a loop around the power pump 5. 7. Lay the loose end of the drive belt from the coolant pump downwards and around the generator belt pulley 6 and deflector roller 7 of cylinder bank 1 − 4. 8. Gather the belt section between the deflector roller of cylinder bank 1 − 4 and the crankshaft belt pulley to form a loop and guide it upwards to the tensioning roller 8. Use a wrench (a/f 30) to turn the tensioning roller 8 clockwise at the hexagon clockwise and put on the drive belt. Slowly relieve the tensioning roller. Fitting the drive belt 9. Check that the drive belt is positioned correctly on the pulleys. 10. Join the positive crankcase ventilation line 1 and the control lead 2 of the bypass valves on the disconnection point under the left deflection roller. 11. Insert the pressure pipe parts of the Y pipe into the charge air cooler to the left and right and tighten the two fastening screws to 10 Nm (7.5 ftlb.). 12. Install the left hot film mass air flow meter. Position the lower hose clamp and tighten it. Then connect the electrical plug. 13. Press the control lead on the bottom of the tubular pieces into the two fastening clips. 14. Connect the cables for the electric fans and clip into the holders. 15. Tighten the holders of the tubular pieces on the lock support. 16. Install the air cleaner covers. To do this, close the two fastening clips on the top side. 17. The coolant bleeder hose and the coolant overflow hose must be clipped back onto the cylinder bank 1 − 4 on the air cleaner housing. 18. Push the air suspension line onto the right air cleaner cover. 19. Press in the intake manifold on the air cleaner in the air cleaner cover. Then insert the two fastening bolts and turn them through 180°. 20. Press the rubber T-piece into the plastic clip on the underside of the Y pipe. Then fit the hose at the bottom. 21. Attach the line to the underside of the Y pipe. 22. Slide the Y pipe onto the throttle body. Insert the two fastening bolts 3 and turn them clockwise through 45°. Fit the electrical plug for the boost pressure sensor 2 and the electrical plug for the throttle adjuster 3. 23. Slide the bellows onto the tubular pieces to the left and right and tighten the hose clamps. 24. Press the four rubber elements in the cover onto the four ball socket holders. The fastening elements must be felt to engage. 25. Install front engine compartment cover.
  46. 1 point
    Hi I ordered a PIWIS 2 kit a couple of weeks ago. I finally got round today to connecting it to car and having a play around for the first time and familiarising myself with the menus and functions. Ran through all the headings 1. Fault Memory 2. Actual Values input signals 3. Drive Links checks 4. Coding Adaptations 5. Maintenance repairs and 6. Programming. And then I made a mistake, I was about to finish and out of curiosity I on the programming menu I selected Auto programming and ran it. It starting running but then the installation aborted. The cars modules seemed to have decoded itself. The electric rear spoiler retracted and what I can assume is the cooling fans are constantly on when the car ignition or engine is switched on. I’ve rerun the scan but cannot see any modules on the car and I seem to have accidently wiped the modules. I have spent the remainder of today going through every single menu/option on the PIWIS to try and recode but have had not success in recoding/programming the modules back (I don’t even have a working instrument cluster although the car engine starts and drives) Does anyone have any advice on how I rectify this? I have a 2009 997.2
  47. 1 point
  48. 1 point
  49. 1 point
    Ive just done this mod now, took me about 10 mins, i earthed mine to the center console bracket. works a treat and still drops the windows when you unlock the top cant fault it, dont think i would use it anything over crawling speed for fear of damage, but i think like some others, its a bit OTT for the hanndbrake and stopped settings
  50. 1 point
    Now let me say that this job was quite straightfoward, BUT I would suggest that you have a bit of experience in bearing fittting as well as presswork or you may really mess things up in a big way. You also need a ball joint service puller set, and yes you need ALL the tools in the kit. I got mine from OTC/ msc industrial supply cat #78453842. You will also need a way to make some mandrels for pressing the bearings in and out. And a way to heat the carrier to around 150 degrees. Now for the fun 1) jack up car and place on jackstands, remove front wheels 2) remove front plastic underpanel 3) have someone hold the brakes (hard) and remove the front large (1.25") axel nut, this is TIGHT 340 ft.lbs. so get ready for a fight. 4) with a brass or aluminium mandrel and a hammer tap, (ok smack), the drive shaft to dislodge it from the splines of the hub (don't mess up the threads!!!) 5)Remove the brake pads and the brake caliper (hex drive) tie it up in the wheel well out of the way 6)Remove the psm sensor, move it to the side (2 10mm nuts) 7)unbolt lower sway bar link 8)unbolt headlight sensor link 9)Remove the brake rotor 10) Remove tin brake shield (10mm bolts) 11) remove 18mm nut and press apart tie rod link with the tool 12) remove the 18mm nut and carefully use the tool to press apart the lower ball joint 13) Unbolt the clamp on the strut, then while pressing down on the lower arm slide the carrier off the strut and the front axel (gt2 remove axel-bearing retainer) and take to the bench 14) Now from the rear side carefully press the center hub out of the bearing, It will come apart with 1/2 the bearing attached to the center hub, it is TIGHT and will take a bit of force to remove it. Be careful NOT to hurt the carrier as it is $$$ if you break it 15) With a puller remove the center race(the part that was left on the shaft) from the hub, set aside 16) take off the 4- 13mm bolts and remove the bearing retainer plate from the carrier 17) HEAT (and DO NOT skip this step) the carrier to 100 deg,F and with a mandrel press/drive out the bearing from the carrier, again BE CAREFUL when suporting the carrier!!!! 18) Clean all parts. 19) Now the bearing is about a .0035 PRESS fit in the carrier, you CANNOT just press it in cold, you MUST heat the carrier to get it in, there are 2 methods to do this a) heat carrier to 100 deg F and using a mandrell that touches only the outer part of the bearing press in the new bearing B) set a inside micrometer to .004 over the bearing size, then heat the carrier to around 150 deg F, at this point check size with the mike to make SURE the carrier is over the size of the bearing and drop the bearing into the carrier, it will slip right in with no force at all, HOWEVER if you goof up and it sticks 1/2 way you are screwed. 20) Replace the bearing retainer plate with the 4 bolts, if yours has it the small notch goes to the bottom, its a water drain, torque the bolts, 27 ft lbs 21) Very carefully suporting the inner bearing race only,press in the wheel hub to the stop, be careful not to hurt your new bearing. WATCH what you press on!!!!! 22) assemble in reverse order, center 1.25 nut torques to 340 ft,lbs. 23) make sure to torque all bolts/nut to the correct values and double check all bolts.nuts before driving As you can see this bearing was SHOT, 26,000 miles and sounded like road noise, it did not respond to any tests like a bad bearing at all, so check your bearings!!! Thanks to Jeremy at Imagine Auto for the quick service and the tips, you guys are great !! Good luck !! Do this repair at your own risk, this diy is just provided as a general guide.
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