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How to replace my clutch


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Anyone know of a step by step guide of how to replace the clutch on a 996? Preferably with pictures?

I've been searching the web and can't find anything. In my head it's quite straightforward but I just want to double check before I dive in.

I'm also planning on replacing the RMS and have found this helpful guide, but it doesn't cover much on the actual pressure plate and throw out bearing replacement or torques for any of the clutch related parts.

http://www.c-speedracing.com/howto/996rms/rms1.php

Thanks,

Scott

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That RMS DIY has 99% of what you need - here are a few more tips...

Flywheel

Initial torque: 19 ftlb.

Final torque: 120 degree turn

Pressure plate

In order to avoid deformation of the thrust plate housing, always loosen pressure plate screws in several stages and in diametrically opposite sequence.

Use a disc alignment tool to make sure the new disc is properly centered.

When installing the new pressure plate do the same sequence as loosening - alternating sides and in several stages.

Initial torque: 19 ftlb.

Final torque: 90 degree turn

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  • 2 weeks later...

I agree with Loren that the RMS DIY provides nearly all the instruction you'll need. He also gives excellent torque recommendations - follow them. I just completed a clutch/throw-out bearing replacement on a '99 996 C2. Unfortunately, I didn't photograph every step. It wasn't that difficult IMHO, but I have many years of auto mechanics experience. I did it with the car on floor jacks, only 14" of clearance, in 5 degree MN weather and no fancy equipment. BUT, one big word of caution...be very, very patient. If this is your daily driver...forget it. You'll never get it done in a weekend if this is your first 911 clutch replacement.

Some of the bolts are extremely difficult to remove. Especially, the top bolt of the flywheel housing. The clearances are extremely tight unless you drop the engine/tranny. I had to cut a box end wrench in half to tackle the job. Also, I recommend shorty ratchets (about 3") to finish the job. Once you get the bolts off an average physically fit guy can manhandle the tranny out of it's tight cradle. At this point removing the clutch is super simple...provided you have the right tools. Check out the old clutch vs new...after 80k miles it was very worn. If you've gone this far you might as well change the rear main seal too. Again, it's not difficult if you're patient.

Since you have the tranny out this is the perfect time to change the fluid. Just do it! I found installing the tranny was a bit more difficult than removing it. After all, you're fighting the forces of gravity. But, I did it myself with just a good floor jack. Once installed reconnect the shift linkages, electrical connections, etc. I noticed quite a few posts about bleeding the hydraulic clutch. Again, it's no biggie IF you get the right tools. I use a 3 ft tall super sucker vacuum pump. Had no problems at all.

In summary, this isn't that difficult of a job if you have above average mechanical skills. Make sure you have all the right tools, especially a good torque wrench and tight space ratchets/box end wrenches. Good luck!

post-55365-126896175719_thumb.jpg

post-55365-126896184632_thumb.jpg

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  • 1 month later...

What were the symptoms you were experiencing with that much clutch wear.

I'm trying to figure out if I need to do my clutch at some time - but I've only had the car a year and I can't tell if its me or the car that are the problem!

I experience "kangerooing" on takeoff from time to time when the car is cold - seemingly regardless of how carefully I drop the clutch.

TIA

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I agree with Loren that the RMS DIY provides nearly all the instruction you'll need. He also gives excellent torque recommendations - follow them. I just completed a clutch/throw-out bearing replacement on a '99 996 C2. Unfortunately, I didn't photograph every step. It wasn't that difficult IMHO, but I have many years of auto mechanics experience. I did it with the car on floor jacks, only 14" of clearance, in 5 degree MN weather and no fancy equipment. BUT, one big word of caution...be very, very patient. If this is your daily driver...forget it. You'll never get it done in a weekend if this is your first 911 clutch replacement.

Some of the bolts are extremely difficult to remove. Especially, the top bolt of the flywheel housing. The clearances are extremely tight unless you drop the engine/tranny. I had to cut a box end wrench in half to tackle the job. Also, I recommend shorty ratchets (about 3") to finish the job. Once you get the bolts off an average physically fit guy can manhandle the tranny out of it's tight cradle. At this point removing the clutch is super simple...provided you have the right tools. Check out the old clutch vs new...after 80k miles it was very worn. If you've gone this far you might as well change the rear main seal too. Again, it's not difficult if you're patient.

Since you have the tranny out this is the perfect time to change the fluid. Just do it! I found installing the tranny was a bit more difficult than removing it. After all, you're fighting the forces of gravity. But, I did it myself with just a good floor jack. Once installed reconnect the shift linkages, electrical connections, etc. I noticed quite a few posts about bleeding the hydraulic clutch. Again, it's no biggie IF you get the right tools. I use a 3 ft tall super sucker vacuum pump. Had no problems at all.

In summary, this isn't that difficult of a job if you have above average mechanical skills. Make sure you have all the right tools, especially a good torque wrench and tight space ratchets/box end wrenches. Good luck!

I did one a few months ago and my buddy Marco brought a bunch of extensions to go in from the top to get to that nasty top bolt. Another recommendation; Keep track of the sequence when you take out the bell housing bolts so you don't have to guess which one goes where when you put everything back together.

A tranny jack also makes the manhandling a little less excruciating.

JP

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 4 weeks later...
  • 1 month later...

Anyone know of a step by step guide of how to replace the clutch on a 996? Preferably with pictures?

I've been searching the web and can't find anything. In my head it's quite straightforward but I just want to double check before I dive in.

I'm also planning on replacing the RMS and have found this helpful guide, but it doesn't cover much on the actual pressure plate and throw out bearing replacement or torques for any of the clutch related parts.

http://www.c-speedracing.com/howto/996rms/rms1.php

Thanks,

Scott

The last two months of Excellence Magazine has had very good detailed articles on the RMS and IMS replacement topics

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  • 2 weeks later...

Does anyone have any thoughts on replacing motor or transmission mounts at the same time as the clutch?

My '02 996 Cab has a clutch which is on it's way out - at the least there is probably a warped flywheel. The car is quite drivable, the only real symptom is that if I'm gentle from a start and keep the revs low, there is a strong judder - especially when the car is colder or I'm in reverse. The judder can be quite forceful though, occasionally it almost feels as if the engine is about to bounce out of the car :-(

Do you think that my not getting round to fixing this for over a year now may have damaged one or more of the mounts? Is there a reliable way to test them? Should I fix the clutch and see if everything is then good, or does it make more sense to replace the mounts at the same time? Come to that, which mounts - engine, transmission, both?

Sorry for all the questions - thought I'd get everything out at once :-)

Graham

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