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OK, proof is in the pudding:

I just filled up with DT40, cranked for 10-15secs with the fuel pump fuse out to start building oil pressure, then took the car out for a run. When I first started logging the cam deviation values, the deviation was at the same prior -9.27 value. My first thought was that it was a lot of work for nothing.

Of course all sorts of things started going through my mind as to what else it could be. Then I turned around and looked at the laptop, and the value had dropped to -7.56 and then to -7.53. I noticed that every time I sat at a light idling, the value kept dropping. At the end of a 20 minute run, it dropped down to -6.19, then -6.13 as I sat in the driveway. I supposed it will continue to drop the more miles I put on it.

Although it is at the upper spec, at least I am in the "normal" range. The engine seems much quieter and smoother now at idle too. I'll put some miles on it and probably change the 4-6 cam pads this summer, then consider the IMS bearing.

What you are seeing is the hydraulic tensioners slowly pump up and clean out over time. Run the car for a bit (take it for a 15-20 min. drive so it is fully warmed up) and then recheck the deviation values when you get back.

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Here are some updated pictures of the old cam pads with only 41,000 miles on them.

5E495629-4CA6-4188-A7D7-25A15AB08DA9.jpg

E776F3B8-B131-4DE7-8527-2C03913DB87E.jpg

A6668237-D2A6-455D-8E88-13C14BFF8C01.jpg

That is exactly why Porsche moved away from the more stable five chain in favor of the three chain design.

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JFP, Have you had to replace the newer version cam pads too? In other words are the replacements any better than the originals?

Somewhat, but not earth-shattering better; these should be considered a "maintenance item" that needs to be checked and replaced as needed, like the water pumps.

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After a day of driving, the bank 1 cam deviation has settled around -6.13. I pulled the cam plug after locking to TDC cyl#1 and verified that the cam is ever so slightly off angle counterclockwise with respect to the line the cam cover and cylinder head make. The LN locking tool fits so it is not that far off. I suppose this is due to lack of experience timing one of these engines.

For the moment, I plan to put some miles on the car and enjoy being back on the road. Thanks to everyone that chimed in.

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  • 4 weeks later...

After a day of driving, the bank 1 cam deviation has settled around -6.13. I pulled the cam plug after locking to TDC cyl#1 and verified that the cam is ever so slightly off angle counterclockwise with respect to the line the cam cover and cylinder head make. The LN locking tool fits so it is not that far off. I suppose this is due to lack of experience timing one of these engines.

For the moment, I plan to put some miles on the car and enjoy being back on the road. Thanks to everyone that chimed in.

Xmac - good to hear of your success. I am near finishing mine. I forgot to order the intake to head gasket so I'm in a holding pattern until they get here; they will be here Tuesday. I replaced all the coolant lines, fuel filter and cleaned the heck out of the external engine, components and transmission. The good news is that I was able to set the correct timing on banks 1 & 2, but since the engine is partially back together I'll have to wait a few more days to turn the key. I'm pushing to have it roaring and back on the road by Weds. I'm very curious what the new camshaft deviation readings will be, but more interested in not hearing the 'ticking' noise.

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+1 on the experience setting the timing. It took me a little bit of trial and error, but once I figured it out, setting the timing became pretty easy on the other bank.

I was set at TDC, but one thing I failed to do initially when the cams were out was to set the tick marks on the camshaft to the silver-like color link on the chains. Once this was done and the cams were back in place the timing was lined up, but like yourself, not perfect. I locked the timing tool into the cam, but I wasn't able to get the other end of the timing tool into the other cam hole. I dig some digging around in the Porsche technical manuals and it said to remove the four 10mm bolts holding the cam sprocket. Once I did this, I was able to use a rubber mallet and gently tap the part of the timing tool that wasn't lining up into the hole and then push it into the hole to lock it into place. I put the four bolts back into the sprocket and torque them down to specs and removed the cam timing tool. And sure enough, everything was aligned and 'timed' correctly.

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A few things to point out here.

1. In one of the early pictures you were using the short cam locking tool that only fits into the notch on the exhaust cam. This tool is for the 3.6 VarioCamPlus 3 chain engine. The method for setting the timing on 3.6 cars is very different. For your engine you need to use the long locking tool that fits into the notches on the exhaust cam and the port for the intake cam.

2. Visually setting the cams is hard to do. I am the one with the 12 degree deviation that you mentioned. I used the visual method as when I set the cam timing several years ago I did not have either the long locking tool or the OEM style tool. I used a straight edge to visually align the slots but was still off . 12 degrees at the crank is only 6 degrees at the cam and is really hard to see.

3. There is a notch on the sprocket end of the intake cam. You use these slots to determine if the engine is at TDC for each bank. Of cylinders. For the 1-3 bank the notch will be toward the outside/away from the crank when this bank is at TDC. For the 4-6 bank the notch on its intake will be toward the crank when the. 4-6 side is at TDC.

4. For the simple cam locking tool the proper method to set the cam timing is to put the engine close to TDC, just close enough so the the tool fits into the notches on the exhaust cam and into the port of the intake cam. This may be slightly off TDC. Then loosen the bolts on the sprocket on the exhaust cam and move the engine to TDC. This should not take more than a few degrees of rotation. Don't try to rotate the crank 360 degrees or you will have valves hitting pistons. The tool is not meant to be used to rotate the cam. This tools should be able to be used with the engine in the car which is helpful.

5. If you have OEM style timing tool, which really won't fit with the engine in the car, the method to set the timing is different. You set the engine at TDC, then install the tool. The piece that fits into the notches in the exhaust cam rotates on an arm so if the cam is off it is possible to insert the tool into the notches. Then you loosen the bolts on the sprocket and rotate the arm of the tool until the other end fits into the port of the intake cam. Then you tighten the bolts to lock in the timing. I can post pictures of this if you would like but I don't have them with me now.

I just used the OEM style tool to reset the timing of my cams over the weekend. Both side looked to be very close but. 1-3 had been. Showing a12 degree deviation and 4-6 a 3 degree deviation. When I used the tool the deviations were apparent. I don't have the engine back in the car yet as I am doing ceramic IMS bearing, the Direct Oil Feed. IMS flange, the latest RMS seal and a few other items. I hope to finish things up and have the engine back in by the weekend and. I am anxious to see if my deviations are gone.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I just used the OEM style tool to reset the timing of my cams over the weekend. Both side looked to be very close but. 1-3 had been. Showing a12 degree deviation and 4-6 a 3 degree deviation. When I used the tool the deviations were apparent. I don't have the engine back in the car yet as I am doing ceramic IMS bearing, the Direct Oil Feed. IMS flange, the latest RMS seal and a few other items. I hope to finish things up and have the engine back in by the weekend and. I am anxious to see if my deviations are gone.

Any update?

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Engine is back in the car but I have a leak in the cooling system, it won't maintain vacuum with my airlift. New hose is supposed to be here today. Hopefully I will start it up this weekend. I have been a little distracted as I became a grandfather yesterday!

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Engine is back in the car but I have a leak in the cooling system, it won't maintain vacuum with my airlift. New hose is supposed to be here today. Hopefully I will start it up this weekend. I have been a little distracted as I became a grandfather yesterday!

Congratulations on grandfather status! :cheers:

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Engine is back in the car but I have a leak in the cooling system, it won't maintain vacuum with my airlift. New hose is supposed to be here today. Hopefully I will start it up this weekend. I have been a little distracted as I became a grandfather yesterday!

Congratulations on the new family addition! :thumbup:

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