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As many in the US have experienced this year, the winter has been quite cold, and Iowa City has not been above freezing temperature in a looooong time. I do want to be able to drive my car in the winter but find myself driving my other car to prevent my 997 from getting dirty. This is defeating the point of having a 4WD, winter tire ready car! I have not washed my car this winter yet.

Question: How do people wash their cars during the winter months when temperature doesn't go above 20 degrees Fahrenheit?

Option of 'touchless' car wash that I've used in the past has damaged my rims because of guide rails. Normally I wash it outside using my own house hose and several buckets, mitts, etc per previous post (below) but there obviously is no running water for the hose. Moreover, it's so cold that any water on the car freezes very quickly. I do not have the luxury of having my own temperature controleld indoor car wash like my condo building had in Seattle.

http://www.renntech.org/forums/topic/44341-what-do-you-use-to-wash-your-car/?hl=seahawkeye#entry239214

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As many in the US have experienced this year, the winter has been quite cold, and Iowa City has not been above freezing temperature in a looooong time. I do want to be able to drive my car in the winter but find myself driving my other car to prevent my 997 from getting dirty. This is defeating the point of having a 4WD, winter tire ready car! I have not washed my car this winter yet.

Question: How do people wash their cars during the winter months when temperature doesn't go above 20 degrees Fahrenheit?

Option of 'touchless' car wash that I've used in the past has damaged my rims because of guide rails. Normally I wash it outside using my own house hose and several buckets, mitts, etc per previous post (below) but there obviously is no running water for the hose. Moreover, it's so cold that any water on the car freezes very quickly. I do not have the luxury of having my own temperature controleld indoor car wash like my condo building had in Seattle.

http://www.renntech.org/forums/topic/44341-what-do-you-use-to-wash-your-car/?hl=seahawkeye#entry239214

Realistically, there is no way to do what you want, and even if you could get running water onto the car, you risk freezing the doors and windows in place. If you cannot find a detail shop that will wash and dry the car indoors in a warm environment, you are better off leaving it dirty.

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We get customers that call in after freezing themselves out of their cars asking what to do, we tell them to wait for it to warm up, thaw out, and dry completely before trying to get into the car. Our local Porsche dealer parts guy once told me they sell more replacement door handles during freezing weather than the rest of the year combined..............

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I live in Calgary, Alberta and the temp is well below freezing a majority of the winter. I wash our cars once a week when the car washes are open. (they close win the temp is down to -18c) I am fortunate to have two car washes within 3 km of my house. I washes them and park them in the garage until they dry. The touchless car washes I use have dries at the and and blow most of the water off. I have no issues with doors or handles with this method.

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I have always found that a very light coat of vaseline over the door seals stops them from freezing shut. Just a touch as you don't want it on your clothes or more to the point on SWMBO's :-)

I also lubricate handle mechanisms with graphite which though, not 100% seems to help. Then again, here in the UK we may get feet of rain but not necessarily the temperatures you are talking about for as long.

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As many in the US have experienced this year, the winter has been quite cold, and Iowa City has not been above freezing temperature in a looooong time. I do want to be able to drive my car in the winter but find myself driving my other car to prevent my 997 from getting dirty. This is defeating the point of having a 4WD, winter tire ready car! I have not washed my car this winter yet.

Question: How do people wash their cars during the winter months when temperature doesn't go above 20 degrees Fahrenheit?

Option of 'touchless' car wash that I've used in the past has damaged my rims because of guide rails. Normally I wash it outside using my own house hose and several buckets, mitts, etc per previous post (below) but there obviously is no running water for the hose. Moreover, it's so cold that any water on the car freezes very quickly. I do not have the luxury of having my own temperature controleld indoor car wash like my condo building had in Seattle.

http://www.renntech.org/forums/topic/44341-what-do-you-use-to-wash-your-car/?hl=seahawkeye#entry239214

Realistically, there is no way to do what you want, and even if you could get running water onto the car, you risk freezing the doors and windows in place. If you cannot find a detail shop that will wash and dry the car indoors in a warm environment, you are better off leaving it dirty.

JFP is right. Water expands as it freezes. I have seen it crack tail light lenses! Remember, as temperature drops chemical reactions...like rusting, slow down dramatically. Below freezing rusting essentially stops. So, the best strategy is to wash the car only when the ambient temp is above freezing and will stay that way until the car is dry. Using a leaf blower to blast the water out of all the nooks and crannys is good insurance against freezing water damage.

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