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I  have a 2009 997.2 PDK Carrera 2 and am getting a loss of power and this error code:

2510: Fuel high-pressure control - adaptation. Value below lower limit value
 

I believe this means my HPFP is dead and am looking for the workshop procedure for replacing the high pressure fuel pump HPFP. I have looked far and wide for a DIY tutorial on this, but found nothing. My local stealership will do the work for $900 labor plus parts. I have sourced the pump for $850 and want to do the work myself. The pump looks readily accessible at the back right end of the engine, facing the rear bumper.

I am happy to write this up as a DIY with pics if someone can forward me the workshop manual pages or procedure?

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I have a 2010 997.2 and I noticed before I purchased the car from its first owner, his records indicated there was a Factory Recall on the high pressure pump. Check with your dealer to see if your car was done.

George

 

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Start with a low pressure check, when the pressure and/or flow rate of the regular pump inside the tank is not right, the high pressure pump will not reach the required values and cause an error code as well.   

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For this is a pressure gauge with the appropriate connections required and a measuring glass and timer for the flow. Unfortunately i have no specific values available at this time, it will be available trough the piwis system where pages of the workshop manual will be made available, be subject to payment. Hopefully someone has the values here in the forum yet. 

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Well, I couldn't find any information at all anywhere on replacing this, so I just worked it out for myself. Bought the pump from Porsche for $850 plus $150 core charge, pulled the exhausts off, removed the pump, installed the new pump, refitted the exhausts, took it for a test run. The car is transformed, a lot more power and no fault codes for the fuel pump. Took me 3 hours, Porsche were going to charge 4 hours.

 

However, I now have brand new fault codes of :

    
Siemens Digital Motor Electronics SDI3

Current Fault Codes    2310: Bar ignition module, cylinder 4 - Upper limit value exceeded

      
Transmission - PDK

Current Fault Codes    C418: U0418 - CAN fault, brake

 

They could have been there before though, my Durametric always hung when reading the codes, but now I have replaced the pump it scans this car properly without hanging.

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  • 2 months later...

Hey, I seem to have a HPFP problem with my car. When it starts, it idles rough and then check engine light and reduced power comes on... I am getting a p1026 code which googling it...has come up with the HPFP problem for other people.

I know where the pump is and would be tempted to change it myself but there seems to be a pipe or bar right behind my pump, I was wondering can you get the pump out as easy as you say or do you need to remove other parts? Is it really a matter of unscrewing and screwing the new one in? If it is this easy I may do it myself otherwise I will just send it to Porsche.

Any steps or tips would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks!

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That pipe is a coolant pipe. I managed to replace mine without disconnecting it, but it would be easier to replace if you did. There is a small drive gear in the engine that turns the pump, and the pump has a small tang that engages into the drive. It was a little tricky getting those to engage correctly when the coolant pipe was in the way.

 

It is not a difficult DIY. Unless your dealer is going to do the labor for less than $200, I would do it myself. My dealer wanted almost $2k to replace mine.

 

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Yeah I was thinking that would be tricky to put in place. I managed to get an image online of the pump...so I was looking at that. I guess it will not fit in place unless it's in the right position, right? I wouldn't want to put it in, think it was OK then start engine and break internal engine parts :-( :-)

 

To replace by Porsche is way cheaper here than US... around £300pounds for labour, but my problem is, they are 60miles away and I would probably need my car transported to them etc..probably another 150bucks  and then there's the waiting time and going to pick it up again which is not convenient.

I normally do the general maintenance of my cars. Looking at where this is, I think I could manage it. Just want to make sure there is no wizardry or magical powers required to get it out nor to get it in again.

 

i would want to stay away from draining the coolant system too as I imagine thats a nightmare to bleed afterwards.

 

I also have a grease pit that might enable me to do it without stripping the back down... thus saving an hour....but must look and see if it's possible.

 

Thanks for your help!

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It would be possible to get the pump fitted without the tang in the correct place, but I made very sure that I aligned them correctly before installation. It is pretty easy to do that correctly. The 'gear' in the engine side is like a large brass-coloured ring with a slot in it, and the pump tang fits in that slot. 

 

It's not too difficult to refill the coolant, and you can clamp the rubber hose part to minimize coolant loss. The best way is to buy a $50 AirLift vaccum filler that you hook to your air compressor, but you could also do it just by filling and topping up a few times after running. Like I said, I undid the hose clamps and retainers for that coolant tube and managed to move it enough without stressing the pipe to fit the pump behind it.

 

The largest part of the job for me was undoing the rusted exhaust bolts, but all came off after soaking overnight with penetrant and a bit of heat on a couple of them.

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Thanks. Unless something changes my mind in the next few days I will change this myself. 

The exhaust bolts! I spent many hours changing mine a few months back. Thankfully I am now using nice stainless steel bolts that were copper greased to the moon. So never a problem again removing those bad boys. Although I never expected to be removing it so soon again :-(

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On 3/8/2017 at 4:30 AM, SpawnyWhippet said:

Well, I couldn't find any information at all anywhere on replacing this, so I just worked it out for myself. Bought the pump from Porsche for $850 plus $150 core charge, pulled the exhausts off, removed the pump, installed the new pump, refitted the exhausts, took it for a test run. The car is transformed, a lot more power and no fault codes for the fuel pump. Took me 3 hours, Porsche were going to charge 4 hours.

 

However, I now have brand new fault codes of :

    
Siemens Digital Motor Electronics SDI3

Current Fault Codes    2310: Bar ignition module, cylinder 4 - Upper limit value exceeded

      
Transmission - PDK

Current Fault Codes    C418: U0418 - CAN fault, brake

 

They could have been there before though, my Durametric always hung when reading the codes, but now I have replaced the pump it scans this car properly without hanging.

 

Hello SpawnyWhippet and others...

 

I have exactly the same fault codes than you (2310 and C418:U0418). Did you figure out how to fix those issues?

 

Thanks!

Edited by tomprout
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I have not found a cure for the 2310 code. I cleared it a couple of times after I did the HPFP and then it never came back.

 

I also did not find a cure for C418, everything seems to work and my dealer didn't seem very interested in diagnosing it when I was last down there.

 

Sorry I can't be more help on this one.

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